214

So I have the following, which seems incredibly hacky, and I've been thinking to myself that Go has better designed libraries than this, but I can't find an example of Go handling a POST request of JSON data. They are all form POSTs.

Here is an example request: curl -X POST -d "{\"test\": \"that\"}" http://localhost:8082/test

And here is the code, with the logs embedded:

package main

import (
    "encoding/json"
    "log"
    "net/http"
)

type test_struct struct {
    Test string
}

func test(rw http.ResponseWriter, req *http.Request) {
    req.ParseForm()
    log.Println(req.Form)
    //LOG: map[{"test": "that"}:[]]
    var t test_struct
    for key, _ := range req.Form {
        log.Println(key)
        //LOG: {"test": "that"}
        err := json.Unmarshal([]byte(key), &t)
        if err != nil {
            log.Println(err.Error())
        }
    }
    log.Println(t.Test)
    //LOG: that
}

func main() {
    http.HandleFunc("/test", test)
    log.Fatal(http.ListenAndServe(":8082", nil))
}

There's got to be a better way, right? I'm just stumped in finding what the best practice could be.

(Go is also known as Golang to the search engines, and mentioned here so others can find it.)

  • 3
    if you use curl -X POST -H 'Content-Type: application/json' -d "{\"test\": \"that\"}", then req.Form["test"] should return "that" – Vinicius Dec 5 '15 at 23:42
  • @Vinicius are there any proofs of this? – diraria Dec 15 '17 at 21:41
338

Please use json.Decoder instead of json.Unmarshal.

func test(rw http.ResponseWriter, req *http.Request) {
    decoder := json.NewDecoder(req.Body)
    var t test_struct
    err := decoder.Decode(&t)
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
    log.Println(t.Test)
}
  • 61
    Could you please explain why? – Ryan Bigg Jul 29 '13 at 2:41
  • 72
    For start, it looks like this can handle a stream rather than needing you to load it all into a buffer yourself. (I'm a different Joe BTW) – Joe Sep 5 '13 at 15:14
  • 5
    I wonder how proper error handling would look like in this case. I don't think it's a good idea to panic on an invalid json. – codepushr Nov 25 '14 at 18:52
  • 13
    I don't think you need to defer req.Body.Close() From the docs: "The Server will close the request body. The ServeHTTP Handler does not need to." Also to answer @thisisnotabus, from the docs: "For server requests the Request Body is always non-nil but will return EOF immediately when no body is present" golang.org/pkg/net/http/#Request – Drew LeSueur Mar 7 '17 at 22:25
  • 12
    I would suggest not using json.Decoder. It is intended for streams of JSON objects, not a single object. It is not more efficient for a single JSON object since it reads the entire object into memory. It has a downside that if garbage is included after the object it will not complain. Depending on a few factors, json.Decoder may not fully read the body and the connection will be ineligible for reuse. – Kale B May 21 '17 at 20:58
73

You need to read from req.Body. The ParseForm method is reading from the req.Body and then parsing it in standard HTTP encoded format. What you want is to read the body and parse it in JSON format.

Here's your code updated.

package main

import (
    "encoding/json"
    "log"
    "net/http"
    "io/ioutil"
)

type test_struct struct {
    Test string
}

func test(rw http.ResponseWriter, req *http.Request) {
    body, err := ioutil.ReadAll(req.Body)
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
    log.Println(string(body))
    var t test_struct
    err = json.Unmarshal(body, &t)
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
    log.Println(t.Test)
}

func main() {
    http.HandleFunc("/test", test)
    log.Fatal(http.ListenAndServe(":8082", nil))
}
  • Thanks! I see where I was going wrong now. If you call req.ParseForm(), which I was doing in earlier attempts of trying to solve this problem, before you try and read the req.Body, it seems to clear the body out and unexpected end of JSON input is thrown when you go to Unmarshal (at least in 1.0.2) – TomJ Mar 28 '13 at 1:46
  • 1
    @Daniel: When I do curl -X POST -d "{\"tes\": \"that\"}" localhost:8082/test, log.Println(t.Test) returns empty. Why ? Or for that matter if post any other JSON, it returns empty – Somesh Oct 30 '14 at 12:46
  • Your POST request is wrong. tes != test. Appreciate that was 5 years ago :/ – Rambatino Feb 8 at 4:19
40

I was driving myself crazy with this exact problem. My JSON Marshaller and Unmarshaller were not populating my Go struct. Then I found the solution at https://eager.io/blog/go-and-json:

"As with all structs in Go, it’s important to remember that only fields with a capital first letter are visible to external programs like the JSON Marshaller."

After that, my Marshaller and Unmarshaller worked perfectly!

  • You are officially my hero. I fought with this for 2 weeks trying to figure out why it was not working. – Richard Varno Apr 11 at 3:28
16

I found the following example from the docs really helpful (source here).

package main

import (
    "encoding/json"
    "fmt"
    "io"
    "log"
    "strings"
)

func main() {
    const jsonStream = `
        {"Name": "Ed", "Text": "Knock knock."}
        {"Name": "Sam", "Text": "Who's there?"}
        {"Name": "Ed", "Text": "Go fmt."}
        {"Name": "Sam", "Text": "Go fmt who?"}
        {"Name": "Ed", "Text": "Go fmt yourself!"}
    `
    type Message struct {
        Name, Text string
    }
    dec := json.NewDecoder(strings.NewReader(jsonStream))
    for {
        var m Message
        if err := dec.Decode(&m); err == io.EOF {
            break
        } else if err != nil {
            log.Fatal(err)
        }
        fmt.Printf("%s: %s\n", m.Name, m.Text)
    }
}

The key here being that the OP was looking to decode

type test_struct struct {
    Test string
}

...in which case we would drop the const jsonStream, and replace the Message struct with the test_struct:

func test(rw http.ResponseWriter, req *http.Request) {
    dec := json.NewDecoder(req.Body)
    for {
        var t test_struct
        if err := dec.Decode(&t); err == io.EOF {
            break
        } else if err != nil {
            log.Fatal(err)
        }
        log.Printf("%s\n", t.Test)
    }
}

Update: I would also add that this post provides some great data about responding with JSON as well. The author explains struct tags, which I was not aware of.

Since JSON does not normally look like {"Test": "test", "SomeKey": "SomeVal"}, but rather {"test": "test", "somekey": "some value"}, you can restructure your struct like this:

type test_struct struct {
    Test string `json:"test"`
    SomeKey string `json:"some-key"`
}

...and now your handler will parse JSON using "some-key" as opposed to "SomeKey" (which you will be using internally).

12

There are two reasons why json.Decoder should be preferred over json.Unmarshal - that are not addressed in the most popular answer from 2013:

  1. February 2018, go 1.10 introduced a new method json.Decoder.DisallowUnknownFields() which addresses the concern of detecting unwanted JSON-input
  2. req.Body is already an io.Reader. Reading its entire contents and then performing json.Unmarshal wastes resources if the stream was, say a 10MB block of invalid JSON. Parsing the request body, with json.Decoder, as it streams in would trigger an early parse error if invalid JSON was encountered. Processing I/O streams in realtime is the preferred go-way.

Addressing some of the user comments about detecting bad user input:

To enforce mandatory fields, and other sanitation checks, try:

d := json.NewDecoder(req.Body)
d.DisallowUnknownFields() // catch unwanted fields

// anonymous struct type: handy for one-time use
t := struct {
    Test *string `json:"test"` // pointer so we can test for field absence
}{}

err := d.Decode(&t)
if err != nil {
    // bad JSON or unrecognized json field
    http.Error(rw, err.Error(), http.StatusBadRequest)
    return
}

if t.Test == nil {
    http.Error(rw, "missing field 'test' from JSON object", http.StatusBadRequest)
    return
}

// optional extra check
if d.More() {
    http.Error(rw, "extraneous data after JSON object", http.StatusBadRequest)
    return
}

// got the input we expected: no more, no less
log.Println(*t.Test)

Playground

Typical output:

$ curl -X POST -d "{}" http://localhost:8082/strict_test

expected json field 'test'

$ curl -X POST -d "{\"Test\":\"maybe?\",\"Unwanted\":\"1\"}" http://localhost:8082/strict_test

json: unknown field "Unwanted"

$ curl -X POST -d "{\"Test\":\"oops\"}g4rB4g3@#$%^&*" http://localhost:8082/strict_test

extraneous data after JSON

$ curl -X POST -d "{\"Test\":\"Works\"}" http://localhost:8082/strict_test 

log: 2019/03/07 16:03:13 Works

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