51

I've got multiple classes (including TPT) in my project. Each POCO has a BaseClass, which has a GUID (called GlobalKey) as primary key.

First I used DataAnnotations to create correct foreign keys. But then I've got problems synchronizing the corresponding GUID with the object itself.

Now I want to have only one virtual navigation property so that the GUID field in the database is created by NamingConvention. But the field name always adds an underscore followed by the word GlobalKey (which is right). When I want to remove the underscore, I don't want to go thru all my POCOs in the fluent API to do this:

// Remove underscore from Navigation-Field     
modelBuilder.Entity<Person>()
            .HasOptional(x => x.Address)
            .WithMany()
            .Map(a => a.MapKey("AddressGlobalKey"));

Any ideas to do this for all POCOS by overwriting a convention?

Thanks in advance.

Andreas

5
  • You cannot do this - yet. There's a customizable conventions for code-first development feature being worked on for EF 6.0 but for now - you'll have to handle this yourself, manually... – marc_s Mar 28 '13 at 15:02
  • I am actually working with EF6 alpha 2. Is it possible, to use it in this way? – Andreas Geier Mar 28 '13 at 15:08
  • Check out this blog post - this fellow seems to be doing something similar to what you want. – marc_s Mar 28 '13 at 17:03
  • Thank you marc. That nearly fits my requirements, but I can use this, when I have the NavigationProperties coded and dont want to add a [ForeignKey]-DataAnnotation. But I dont have coded any Id or Guid Property. My only navigationproperty is the object itself. So EF creates an additional Property named i.E. Address_GlobalKey. This name is, what i want to manipulate in the convention. I could not find a blog how to do this. – Andreas Geier Apr 2 '13 at 6:08
  • Please mark the best answer. – crimbo Jan 8 '14 at 21:54
68

I finally found an answer for this, by writing a custom convention. This convention works in EF 6.0 RC1 (code from last week), so I think it's likely to continue to work after EF 6.0 is released.

With this approach, the standard EF conventions identify the independent associations (IAs), and then create the EdmProperty for the foreign key field. Then this convention comes along and renames the foreign key fields.

/// <summary>
/// Provides a convention for fixing the independent association (IA) foreign key column names.
/// </summary>
public class ForeignKeyNamingConvention : IStoreModelConvention<AssociationType>
{

    public void Apply(AssociationType association, DbModel model)
    {
        // Identify a ForeignKey properties (including IAs)
        if (association.IsForeignKey)
        {
            // rename FK columns
            var constraint = association.Constraint;
            if (DoPropertiesHaveDefaultNames(constraint.FromProperties, constraint.ToRole.Name, constraint.ToProperties))
            {
                NormalizeForeignKeyProperties(constraint.FromProperties);
            }
            if (DoPropertiesHaveDefaultNames(constraint.ToProperties, constraint.FromRole.Name, constraint.FromProperties))
            {
                NormalizeForeignKeyProperties(constraint.ToProperties);
            }
        }
    }

    private bool DoPropertiesHaveDefaultNames(ReadOnlyMetadataCollection<EdmProperty> properties, string roleName, ReadOnlyMetadataCollection<EdmProperty> otherEndProperties)
    {
        if (properties.Count != otherEndProperties.Count)
        {
            return false;
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < properties.Count; ++i)
        {
            if (!properties[i].Name.EndsWith("_" + otherEndProperties[i].Name))
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    }

    private void NormalizeForeignKeyProperties(ReadOnlyMetadataCollection<EdmProperty> properties)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < properties.Count; ++i)
        {
            string defaultPropertyName = properties[i].Name;
            int ichUnderscore = defaultPropertyName.IndexOf('_');
            if (ichUnderscore <= 0)
            {
                continue;
            }
            string navigationPropertyName = defaultPropertyName.Substring(0, ichUnderscore);
            string targetKey = defaultPropertyName.Substring(ichUnderscore + 1);

            string newPropertyName;
            if (targetKey.StartsWith(navigationPropertyName))
            {
                newPropertyName = targetKey;
            }
            else
            {
                newPropertyName = navigationPropertyName + targetKey;
            }
            properties[i].Name = newPropertyName;
        }
    }

}

Note that the Convention is added to your DbContext in your DbContext.OnModelCreating override, using:

modelBuilder.Conventions.Add(new ForeignKeyNamingConvention());
9
  • 9
    Instead of adding convention at last, you can add it before ForeignKeyIndexConvention to apply naming convention to foreign key index names --- modelBuilder.Conventions.AddBefore<System.Data.Entity.ModelConfiguration.Conventions.ForeignKeyIndexConvention>(new ForeignKeyNamingConvention()); – Kedar Vaidya Jul 9 '14 at 8:27
  • This code didn't quite work for me because this test was always false: if (!properties[i].Name.EndsWith("_" + otherEndProperties[i].Name)) In fact, the Name itself already contained the underscore. So I skipped that whole test and just always call NormalizeForeignKeyProperties. – Rob Kent Jul 15 '14 at 11:34
  • 4
    Hey look! Microsoft "borrowed" my answer for MSDN: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/data/dn469439.aspx#example2 Since they've been so awesome about open-sourcing projects like EF and ASP.NET, I'm happy to let it slide... – crimbo Oct 23 '14 at 2:51
  • 1
    I might be late here, but I have created a gist to improve upon @crimbo's answer: gist.github.com/rexcfnghk/3a6becedb3e09819a4e0 – rexcfnghk May 18 '15 at 9:18
  • 1
    I just stumbled upon this and also found that it wasn't working as expected. The check if (!properties[i].Name.EndsWith("_" + otherEndProperties[i].Name)) in my case is comparing the from end (e.g. "Project_Id") to the to end (e.g. "ProjectId") which returns false and therefore doesn't fix the from end. This appears to be due to the fact that I also have a PrimaryKeyConvention which removes underscores from the names. So it would seem that the check to make sure it doesn't conflict with other conventions is actually causing it to conflict with other conventions. – Derek Greer Sep 20 '16 at 15:25
5

You can do one of two things:

  1. Follow EF conventions in naming of foreign keys, i.e. if you have virtual Address, define your key property as AddressId

  2. Tell EF explicitly what to use. One way to do this is with Fluent API, as you are currently doing. You can also use data annotations, though:

    [ForeignKey("Address")]
    public int? AddressGlobalKey { get; set; }
    
    public virtual Address Address { get; set; }
    

That's your only choices.

4
  • I've done this before, but I got Problems on sync. So I'm searching for a way to do it in EF6. – Andreas Geier Mar 28 '13 at 17:30
  • What error(s) did you get? This is pretty basic functionality and should still work in EF6 (unless, something's broken, which is of course a possibility with prerelease software). – Chris Pratt Mar 28 '13 at 18:48
  • I got PK-Constraint errors, when tried to call SaveChanges(). i.e. In the situation, when the Address object, which was created ans saved before I tried to save the Person-Object, which contained a reference to the Address-Object. The Navigation-Property was correct, while the corresponding Guid-Property was not (null or Guid.Empty) which is normally no problem. (continued ...) – Andreas Geier Mar 28 '13 at 23:34
  • The State of the Address-Object in that situation was Added (should have been Attached) but I could not change it, because I was using a static Generic Method in a different Class for saving the enties. Now when I removed the additional AddressGlobalKey-Property, everything worked fine. The only thing is the name of the column in the Database. – Andreas Geier Mar 28 '13 at 23:34
5

I know this is a bit old, but here is a sample how I specify mapping columns through my fluent config (OnModelCreating):

modelBuilder.Entity<Application>()
            .HasOptional(c => c.Account)
                .WithMany()
                .Map(c => c.MapKey("AccountId"));

Hope this helps,

1
  • 1
    @ProfK I didn't vote but I'm guessing because the OP wanted a convention that will be applied across the board. – Casey Apr 1 '16 at 15:13
1

I have also seen the same problem when the type of the field is off. Double check the type of the field Ex:

public string StateId {get;set;}

pointing to a domain object with int as the State.Id type. Make sure that your types are same.

0

I found that key column customizations were not being caught by the ForeignKeyNamingConvention. Made this change to catch them.

private bool DoPropertiesHaveDefaultNames(ReadOnlyMetadataCollection<EdmProperty> properties, string roleName, ReadOnlyMetadataCollection<EdmProperty> otherEndProperties)
{
    if (properties.Count == otherEndProperties.Count)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < properties.Count; ++i)
        {
            if (properties[i].Name.EndsWith("_" + otherEndProperties[i].Name))
            {
                return true;
            }
            else
            {
                var preferredNameProperty =
                    otherEndProperties[i]
                        .MetadataProperties
                        .SingleOrDefault(x => x.Name.Equals("PreferredName"));

                if (null != preferredNameProperty)
                {
                    if (properties[i].Name.EndsWith("_" + preferredNameProperty.Value))
                    {
                        return true;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return false;
}
1
  • I think you've introduced a bug if you have more than one column in the properties collection since you return true on the first success – Paul Hatcher Jun 13 '15 at 14:17
0

I had issues when combining it with an id naming convention of EntityNameId.

When using the following convention to ensure the Customer table has CustomerId rather than simply Id.

modelBuilder.Properties()
                        .Where(p => p.Name == "Id")
                        .Configure(p => p.IsKey().HasColumnName(p.ClrPropertyInfo.ReflectedType == null ? "Id" : p.ClrPropertyInfo.ReflectedType.Name +"Id"));

The foreign key naming convention needs to be changed to the following.

 /// <summary>
    /// Provides a convention for fixing the independent association (IA) foreign key column names.
    /// </summary>
    public class ForeignKeyNamingConvention : IStoreModelConvention<AssociationType>
    { 
        public void Apply(AssociationType association, DbModel model) 
        { 
            // Identify ForeignKey properties (including IAs)  
            if (!association.IsForeignKey) return;

            // rename FK columns  
            var constraint = association.Constraint; 
            if (DoPropertiesHaveDefaultNames(constraint.FromProperties, constraint.ToProperties)) 
            { 
                NormalizeForeignKeyProperties(constraint.FromProperties); 
            } 

            if (DoPropertiesHaveDefaultNames(constraint.ToProperties, constraint.FromProperties)) 
            { 
                NormalizeForeignKeyProperties(constraint.ToProperties); 
            }
        } 

        private static bool DoPropertiesHaveDefaultNames(IReadOnlyList<EdmProperty> properties, IReadOnlyList<EdmProperty> otherEndProperties) 
        { 
            if (properties.Count != otherEndProperties.Count) 
            { 
                return false; 
            } 

            for (var i = 0; i < properties.Count; ++i)
            {
                if (properties[i].Name.Replace("_", "") != otherEndProperties[i].Name) 
                { 
                    return false; 
                } 
            } 

            return true; 
        } 

        private void NormalizeForeignKeyProperties(ReadOnlyMetadataCollection<EdmProperty> properties) 
        { 
            for (var i = 0; i < properties.Count; ++i) 
            { 
                var underscoreIndex = properties[i].Name.IndexOf('_'); 
                if (underscoreIndex > 0) 
                { 
                    properties[i].Name = properties[i].Name.Remove(underscoreIndex, 1); 
                }                 
            } 
        } 
    }
0

Most of these answers have to do with Independent Assocations (where the "MyOtherTable" navigation property is defined, but not the "int MyOtherTableId") instead of Foreign Key Assocations (where both are defined).

That is fine since the question is about IA (it uses MapKey), but I came across this question when searching for a solution to the same problem with FKAs. Since other people may come here for the same reason, I thought I would share my solution that uses a ForeignKeyDiscoveryConvention.

https://stackoverflow.com/a/43809004/799936

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