104

I have a vector x, that I would like to sort based on the order of values in vector y. The two vectors are not of the same length.

x <- c(2, 2, 3, 4, 1, 4, 4, 3, 3)
y <- c(4, 2, 1, 3)

The expected result would be:

[1] 4 4 4 2 2 1 3 3 3
71

Here is a one liner...

y[sort(order(y)[x])]

[edit:] This breaks down as follows:

order(y)             #We want to sort by y, so order() gives us the sorting order
order(y)[x]          #looks up the sorting order for each x
sort(order(y)[x])    #sorts by that order
y[sort(order(y)[x])] #converts orders back to numbers from orders
  • 1
    That is very succinct, but I'm having a hard time figuring out what's going on there. Could you elaborate a bit? – Matt Parker Oct 14 '09 at 22:14
  • 3
    This is pretty and shows a good understanding of R's built-ins. +1 – Godeke Oct 15 '09 at 15:21
  • 5
    In general one may want to do this even if y is not a permutation of 1:length(y). In that case this solution doesn't work, but gd047's solution below, x[order(match(x,y))], does. – Rahul Savani Feb 3 '12 at 11:56
  • 4
    I'm actually baffled as to why this has 40 upvotes. It fails for so many simple variations on x and y. x <- c(1,4,2); y <- c(1,2,4) for instance. – thelatemail Sep 10 '15 at 1:24
  • 1
    @thelatemail I agree. Stop the insanity and downvote this answer! – Ian Fellows Sep 17 '15 at 20:32
158

what about this one

x[order(match(x,y))]
  • 24
    This is very nice, better than the accepted answer IMHO as it is more general. – fmark May 21 '12 at 10:15
  • 2
    I would go as far as to say this should be in base GNU-R. – catastrophic-failure Oct 17 '16 at 17:00
4

You could convert x into an ordered factor:

x.factor <- factor(x, levels = y, ordered=TRUE)
sort(x)
sort(x.factor)

Obviously, changing your numbers into factors can radically change the way code downstream reacts to x. But since you didn't give us any context about what happens next, I thought I would suggest this as an option.

  • 1
    this should be the best answer since it would work for non integer cases; or also work when there are values in x not in the sorting vector y with slight change: x <- c(2, 2, 3, 4, 1, 4, 4, 3, 3, 6); y <- c(4, 2, 1, 3); as.numeric(as.character(sort(factor(x, unique(c(y, x)))))) – rawr Apr 11 '17 at 23:52
2

How about?:

rep(y,table(x)[as.character(y)])

(Ian's is probably still better)

2

In case you need to get order on "y" no matter if it's numbers or characters:

x[order(ordered(x, levels = y))]
4 4 4 2 2 1 3 3 3

By steps:

a <- ordered(x, levels = y) # Create ordered factor from "x" upon order in "y".
[1] 2 2 3 4 1 4 4 3 3
Levels: 4 < 2 < 1 < 3

b <- order(a) # Define "x" order that match to order in "y".
[1] 4 6 7 1 2 5 3 8 9

x[b] # Reorder "x" according to order in "y".
[1] 4 4 4 2 2 1 3 3 3
1

[Edit: Clearly Ian has the right approach, but I will leave this in for posterity.]

You can do this without loops by indexing on your y vector. Add an incrementing numeric value to y and merge them:

y <- data.frame(index=1:length(y), x=y)
x <- data.frame(x=x)
x <- merge(x,y)
x <- x[order(x$index),"x"]
x
[1] 4 4 4 2 2 1 3 3 3
0
x <- c(2, 2, 3, 4, 1, 4, 4, 3, 3)
y <- c(4, 2, 1, 3)
for(i in y) { z <- c(z, rep(i, sum(x==i))) }

The result in z: 4 4 4 2 2 1 3 3 3

The important steps:

  1. for(i in y) -- Loops over the elements of interest.

  2. z <- c(z, ...) -- Concatenates each subexpression in turn

  3. rep(i, sum(x==i)) -- Repeats i (the current element of interest) sum(x==i) times (the number of times we found i in x).

0

Also you can use sqldf and do it by a join function in sql likes the following:

library(sqldf)
x <- data.frame(x = c(2, 2, 3, 4, 1, 4, 4, 3, 3))
y <- data.frame(y = c(4, 2, 1, 3))

result <- sqldf("SELECT x.x FROM y JOIN x on y.y = x.x")
ordered_x <- result[[1]]

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