233

I have a C# application that has users login to it, and because the hashing algorithm is expensive, it takes a little while to do. How can I display the Wait/Busy Cursor (usually the hourglass) to the user to let them know the program is doing something?

The project is in C#.

10 Answers 10

409

You can use Cursor.Current.

// Set cursor as hourglass
Cursor.Current = Cursors.WaitCursor;

// Execute your time-intensive hashing code here...

// Set cursor as default arrow
Cursor.Current = Cursors.Default;

However, if the hashing operation is really lengthy (MSDN defines this as more than 2-7 seconds), you should probably use a visual feedback indicator other than the cursor to notify the user of the progress. For a more in-depth set of guidelines, see this article.

Edit:
As @Am pointed out, you may need to call Application.DoEvents(); after Cursor.Current = Cursors.WaitCursor; to ensure that the hourglass is actually displayed.

  • 23
    this won't necessary change the cursor - if the message loop won't be called during the time-intensive code. to enable it you need to add Application.DoEvents(); after the first cursor set. – Amirshk Oct 14 '09 at 19:54
  • 15
    You probably want a try..finally block after setting Current, too (insuring that Current gets reset to Default). – TrueWill Dec 23 '09 at 17:50
  • 7
    FYI, i couldnt get the above to work, but by changing it to this.cursor = cursors.waitcursor; it worked. – Hans Rudel Jul 1 '12 at 16:01
  • 4
    Hourglass was not displayed if I used Application.DoEvents() after Cursor.Current = Cursors.WaitCursor However, it did worked without Application.DoEvents() . Not sure Why – Vbp Nov 5 '13 at 13:58
  • 14
    It is better to use Application.UseWaitCursor = true and Application.UseWaitCursor = false – Gianpiero Caretti Aug 24 '16 at 17:45
161

Actually,

Cursor.Current = Cursors.WaitCursor;

temporarily sets the Wait cursor, but doesn’t ensure that the Wait cursor shows until the end of your operation. Other programs or controls within your program can easily reset the cursor back to the default arrow as in fact happens when you move mouse while operation is still running.

A much better way to show the Wait cursor is to set the UseWaitCursor property in a form to true:

form.UseWaitCursor = true;

This will display wait cursor for all controls on the form until you set this property to false. If you want wait cursor to be shown on Application level you should use:

Application.UseWaitCursor = true;
  • Good to know. I was trying to do the same in WPF, and ended up with Cursor = Cursors.Wait and Cursor = Cursors.Arrow. But I couldn't find the Cursor under App – itsho Jul 28 '13 at 11:02
  • 2
    Couldn't find UseWaitCursor under Application ! – Chandra Eskay Jan 26 '15 at 9:12
  • 11
    This works much better than the accepted solution! – JPProgrammer Oct 7 '15 at 3:22
  • I found that, when setting form.UseWaitCursor = false at the end of the operation, it doesn't actually reset the cursor until you move or click the mouse. OTOH, form.Cursor doesn't have this problem. I couldn't get Cursor.Current to work at all. – Stewart Aug 25 '17 at 15:20
30

Building on the previous, my preferred approach (since this is a frequently performed action) is to wrap the wait cursor code in an IDisposable helper class so it can be used with using() (one line of code), take optional parameters, run the code within, then clean up (restore cursor) afterwards.

public class CursorWait : IDisposable
{
    public CursorWait(bool appStarting = false, bool applicationCursor = false)
    {
        // Wait
        Cursor.Current = appStarting ? Cursors.AppStarting : Cursors.WaitCursor;
        if (applicationCursor) Application.UseWaitCursor = true;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        // Reset
        Cursor.Current = Cursors.Default;
        Application.UseWaitCursor = false;
    }
}

Usage:

using (new CursorWait())
{
    // Perform some code that shows cursor
}
26

It is easier to use UseWaitCursor at the Form or Window level. A typical use case can look like below:

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

        try
        {
            this.Enabled = false;//optional, better target a panel or specific controls
            this.UseWaitCursor = true;//from the Form/Window instance
            Application.DoEvents();//messages pumped to update controls
            //execute a lengthy blocking operation here, 
            //bla bla ....
        }
        finally
        {
            this.Enabled = true;//optional
            this.UseWaitCursor = false;
        }
    }

For a better UI experience you should use Asynchrony from a different thread.

  • 1
    This should be the ACCEPTED answer. It is the only one that uses try-finally. – John Henckel May 20 '15 at 15:20
  • 1
    have my upvote, I was missing a try-finally in my implementation – Jack May 22 '16 at 4:21
19

My approach would be to make all the calculations in a background worker.

Then change the cursor like this:

this.Cursor = Cursors.Wait;

And in the thread's finish event restore the cursor:

this.Cursor = Cursors.Default;

Note, this can also be done for specific controls, so the cursor will be the hourglass only when the mouse is above them.

  • They are done in a background thread... – Malfist Oct 14 '09 at 20:00
  • @Malfist: good approach :), then all you need to do is place the restore in the end event, and your done. – Amirshk Oct 14 '09 at 20:09
4

OK so I created a static async method. That disabled the control that launches the action and changes the application cursor. It runs the action as a task and waits for to finish. Control returns to the caller while it waits. So the application remains responsive, even while the busy icon spins.

async public static void LengthyOperation(Control control, Action action)
{
    try
    {
        control.Enabled = false;
        Application.UseWaitCursor = true;
        Task doWork = new Task(() => action(), TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);
        Log.Info("Task Start");
        doWork.Start();
        Log.Info("Before Await");
        await doWork;
        Log.Info("After await");
    }
    finally
    {
        Log.Info("Finally");
        Application.UseWaitCursor = false;
        control.Enabled = true;
    }

Here's the code form the main form

    private void btnSleep_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        var control = sender as Control;
        if (control != null)
        {
            Log.Info("Launching lengthy operation...");
            CursorWait.LengthyOperation(control, () => DummyAction());
            Log.Info("...Lengthy operation launched.");
        }

    }

    private void DummyAction()
    {
        try
        {
            var _log = NLog.LogManager.GetLogger("TmpLogger");
            _log.Info("Action - Sleep");
            TimeSpan sleep = new TimeSpan(0, 0, 16);
            Thread.Sleep(sleep);
            _log.Info("Action - Wakeup");
        }
        finally
        {
        }
    }

I had to use a separate logger for the dummy action (I am using Nlog) and my main logger is writing to the UI (a rich text box). I wasn't able to get the busy cursor show only when over a particular container on the form (but I didn't try very hard.) All controls have a UseWaitCursor property, but it doesn't seem have any effect on the controls I tried (maybe because they weren't on top?)

Here's the main log, which shows things happening in the order we expect:

16:51:33.1064 Launching lengthy operation...
16:51:33.1215 Task Start
16:51:33.1215 Before Await
16:51:33.1215 ...Lengthy operation launched.
16:51:49.1276 After await
16:51:49.1537 Finally
2

Okey,Other people's view are very clear, but I would like to do some added, as follow:

Cursor tempCursor = Cursor.Current;

Cursor.Current = Cursors.WaitCursor;

//do Time-consuming Operations         

Cursor.Current = tempCursor;
2

For Windows Forms applications an optional disabling of a UI-Control can be very useful. So my suggestion looks like this:

public class AppWaitCursor : IDisposable
{
    private readonly Control _eventControl;

    public AppWaitCursor(object eventSender = null)
    {
         _eventControl = eventSender as Control;
        if (_eventControl != null)
            _eventControl.Enabled = false;

        Application.UseWaitCursor = true;
        Application.DoEvents();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (_eventControl != null)
            _eventControl.Enabled = true;

        Cursor.Current = Cursors.Default;
        Application.UseWaitCursor = false;
    }
}

Usage:

private void UiControl_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    using (new AppWaitCursor(sender))
    {
        LongRunningCall();
    }
}
1

With the class below you can make the suggestion of Donut "exception safe".

using (new CursorHandler())
{
    // Execute your time-intensive hashing code here...
}

the class CursorHandler

public class CursorHandler
    : IDisposable
{
    public CursorHandler(Cursor cursor = null)
    {
        _saved = Cursor.Current;
        Cursor.Current = cursor ?? Cursors.WaitCursor;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (_saved != null)
        {
            Cursor.Current = _saved;
            _saved = null;
        }
    }

    private Cursor _saved;
}
0

Use this with WPF:

Cursor = Cursors.Wait;

// Your Heavy work here

Cursor = Cursors.Arrow;

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