64

According to the most programming languages scope rules, I can access variables that defined outside of functions inside them, but why this code doesn't work?

<?php
$data = 'My data';

function menugen(){   
    echo "[".$data."]";
}

menugen();
?>

There is [] in output.

  • 3
    Don't treat it as global, pass it to the function as an argument – Mark Baker Mar 28 '13 at 16:38
  • 1
    Where does the manual say such things? – deceze Mar 28 '13 at 16:39
  • Related reading: PHP global in functions – Jocelyn Mar 28 '13 at 16:42
  • 5
    Who downvoted this? It's a well formed question ... – webnoob Mar 28 '13 at 16:43
  • 2
    @webnoob Questions must not only be well-formed, they must also adhere to the appropriate DTD. Bazinga, an XML joke. – deceze Mar 28 '13 at 16:47
125

It is not working because you have to declare which global variables you'll be accessing:

$data = 'My data';

function menugen() {
    global $data; // <-- add this line

    echo "[".$data."]";
}

menugen();

otherwise you can access it as $GLOBALS['data'], see http://php.net/manual/en/language.variables.scope.php

Even if a little OT, I'd suggest you avoid using globals at all and prefer passing as parameters.

  • Thanks , You are right but they didn't use this line in the second example of manual :php.net/manual/en/language.variables.scope.php – Amin Gholibeigian Mar 28 '13 at 18:46
  • 5
    In fact that second example was there to show the readers what not to do: This script will not produce any output because the echo statement refers to a local version of the $a variable, and it has not been assigned a value within this scope. – Matteo Tassinari Mar 29 '13 at 14:44
  • 1
    Dang! I had to login to upvote this answer just because i creepily forgot php variables scoping. – Milche Patern Dec 3 '15 at 15:32
14

You can do one of the following:

<?php
$data='My data';
function menugen(){
    global $data;
    echo "[".$data."]";
}
menugen();

Or

<?php
$data='My data';
function menugen(){
    echo "[".$GLOBALS['data']."]";
}
menugen();

That being said, overuse of globals can lead to some poor code. It is usually better to pass in what you need. For example instead of referencing a global database object you should pass in a handle to the database and act upon that. This is called Dependency Injection. It makes your life a lot easier when you implement automated testing (which you should).

7

It's a matter of scope. In short, Global variables should be avoided SO:

You either need to pass it as a parameter:

$data = 'My data';

function menugen($data)
{
    echo $data;
}

OR have it in a class and access it

class MyClass
{
    private $data = "";

    function menugen()
    {
        echo this->data;
    }

}

Edit: See @MatteoTassinari answer as well as you can mark it as global to access it but global vars are generally not required so it would be wise to re-think your coding.

  • and another way is to use the keyword global (granted, this is not the best way). – Jocelyn Mar 28 '13 at 16:41
  • Yeah, just edited to add a mention to Matteo's post. – webnoob Mar 28 '13 at 16:42
  • "Should" doesn't answer the question, and this may not be the best approach for every case. For simple scripts, changing parameters around and adding classes is clunky. Much like JavaScript, in PHP not everything needs to be object-oriented and namespaced up the wazoo. – Beejor Aug 21 '16 at 3:44
  • @Beejor Given that the OP has a function called menugen() it implies there is going to be more going than simply generating a menu. For instance, what about extending that menu to add more items from a different source, what about selecting the currently selected page that's in the menu. Having random global vars and logic all over the place screams for OOP design. The fact that PHP / JS doesn't need to be structured is one of the biggest reasons you find lots of messy clunky code. It can be done very well but allows people to have no thought about maintainability going forward. – webnoob Aug 21 '16 at 14:49
  • p.s Down voting the answer is also a bit off. The answer does provide a solution to the OP's problem, just because you don't like it, doesn't make it wrong. – webnoob Aug 21 '16 at 14:51
5

Another way to do it:

<?php

$data = 'My data';

$menugen = function() use ($data) {

    echo "[".$data."]";
};

$menugen();
0

You need to pass the variable into the function:

$data = 'My data';

function menugen($data)
{
    echo $data;
}
0

If you want you can use "define" function but this function create a constants which can't be changed once defined.

<?php
define("GREETING", "Welcome to W3Schools.com!");

function myTest() {
    echo GREETING;
}

myTest();
?>

http://www.w3schools.com/php/php_constants.asp

  • This defines a global constant, not a variable. – Beejor Aug 21 '16 at 3:45
  • What's the different? You can store anythings in it – Mohamad Hamouday Aug 23 '16 at 3:56
  • 3
    Constants can't be changed once defined. – Beejor Aug 26 '16 at 10:00
  • @Beejor Thank you – Mohamad Hamouday Nov 2 '16 at 12:34

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