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I have a vector that represents a 7 card poker hand and I want to find the next hand using the following method:

  • values are from 0 to 12 and are sorted (e.g. [0 0 7 11 11 12 12])
  • A valid vector has atmost 4 of one value
  • The first valid vector is [0 0 0 0 1 1 1]
  • If the values at index and index + 1 are different then increment the value at index and set all the values from 0 to index - 1 to zero
  • Repeat the last step until the vector is valid

For example, (next-hand [0 0 0 0 1 1 1]) would return [0 0 0 1 1 1 1] directly. However, (next-hand [0 0 0 1 1 1 1]) would loop through,

[0 0 1 1 1 1 1] (invalid)
[0 1 1 1 1 1 1] (invalid)
[1 1 1 1 1 1 1] (invalid)
[0 0 0 0 0 0 2] (invalid)
[0 0 0 0 0 1 2] (invalid)

and return this valid hand:

[0 0 0 0 1 1 2]

Here is the sudo code I have, but need to convert this to clojure. Note how I'm adding a really large integer to the end of the hand to make the last comparison always true. Thus, in the case of [1 1 1 1 1 1 1 99] the first loop would end at i=6 with 1 < 99 == true.

let hand = [hand 99]
while hand is invalid
  for i in range(0,6)
    if hand[i] < hand[i+1]
      increment hand[i]
      break
  for j in range(0,i-1)
    hand[j] = 0

Edit Friday, Mar 29, 2013: In order for the select solution to work with the poker hand model I added an is-valid function like so:

(defn is-valid [v]
  (let [distinct-ranks (partition-by identity v)
        count-distinct (map count distinct-ranks)
        max-count (apply max count-distinct)]
    (<= max-count 4)))

and updated to (filter #(is-valid %) in next-hand.

  • Sounds like a job for core.logic. – Alex Taggart Mar 29 '13 at 1:18
  • @AlexTaggart: Don't think so, doesn't sounds like relational/constrain problem – Ankur Mar 29 '13 at 5:13
0

One possible solution:

(defn next [v]
  (let [i (->> (map <  v (rest v))
               (map-indexed vector)
               (filter #(% 1))
               first)
        index (if i (i 0) 6)]
    (for [[i x] (map-indexed vector v)]
      (cond (= i index) (inc x)
            (< i index) 0
            :else x))))

(defn next-hand [v]
  (->> (iterate next (next v))
       (filter #(= 4 (apply + %)))
       first
       vec))

(next-hand [0 0 0 1 1 1 1])
  • This is so close. The next function is perfect. However, next-hand doesn't quit evaluate to a valid next hand. I think, and I'll try to post it tomorrow, it needs a valid-hand function to stop. Can you explain how the iterate works with the other parts. What stop the iterate? – Brett Pontarelli Mar 29 '13 at 6:11
  • The filter in next-hand is used to find the valid hand. In this case valid hand is something where sum of vector is 4, may be you meant something else by valid hand. iterate will generate an infintie sequence of hands where next hand is based on prev hand. – Ankur Mar 29 '13 at 6:24

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