17

I have a text file named foo.txt, and its contents are as below:

this

is

text

How would I print this exact file to the screen in Java 7?

  • 1
    It sounds like you need to read text from a file. I can assure you that there is plenty of information on the web regarding reading from files in Java... – Oliver Charlesworth Mar 29 '13 at 1:30
  • 1
    I'm telling you! I can't find this anywhere! And yes, I use Google. – user2151887 Mar 29 '13 at 1:32
  • 1
    This past question has just the details you're looking for: stackoverflow.com/questions/2788080/reading-a-text-file-in-java. – RouteMapper Mar 29 '13 at 1:33
  • 1
    @user2151887: So you didn't try this? google.co.uk/search?q=java+read+file – Oliver Charlesworth Mar 29 '13 at 1:33
  • 2
    I'm telling you! I can't find this anywhere! And yes, I use Google. I find this hard to believe. Any textbook I've ever seen or general tutorial always has a section on File I/O. Did you even look at the links provided to you on the right hand side of this page? I would think the one titled "Readig a Text File in Java" would be a good place to start. – camickr Mar 29 '13 at 2:46
35

Before Java 7:

 BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("foo.txt"));
 String line = null;
 while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {
   System.out.println(line);
 }
  • add exception handling
  • add closing the stream

Since Java 7, there is no need to close the stream, because it implements autocloseable

try (BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("foo.txt"))) {
   String line = null;
   while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {
       System.out.println(line);
   }
}
10

Why hasn't anyone thought it was worth mentioning Scanner?

Scanner input = new Scanner(new File("foo.txt"));

while (input.hasNextLine())
{
   System.out.println(input.nextLine());
}
  • ...because the question is about Java, which means the code should be overly verbose and hard on the eyes (you asked!). If you haven't tried Groovy (Java-syntax-compatible runs on JVM), I bet you'd like it. – Dem Pilafian Aug 5 '18 at 21:03
2

With Java 7's try-with-resources Jiri's answer can be improved upon:

try (BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("foo.txt"))) {
   String line = null;
   while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {
       System.out.println(line);
   }
}

Add exception handling at the place of your choice, either in this try or elsewhere.

2

For those new to Java and wondering why Jiri's answer doesn't work, make sure you do what he says and handle the exception or else it won't compile. Here's the bare minimum:

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.FileReader;
import java.io.IOException;

public class ReadFile {

    public static void main(String args[]) throws IOException {
        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("test.txt"));
        for (String line; (line = br.readLine()) != null;) {
            System.out.print(line);
        }
        br.close()
    }
}
1

Every example here shows a solution using the FileReader. It is convenient if you do not need to care about a file encoding. If you use some other languages than english, encoding is quite important. Imagine you have file with this text

Příliš žluťoučký kůň
úpěl ďábelské ódy

and the file uses windows-1250 format. If you use FileReader you will get this result:

P��li� �lu�ou�k� k��
�p�l ��belsk� �dy

So in this case you would need to specify encoding as Cp1250 (Windows Eastern European) but the FileReader doesn't allow you to do so. In this case you should use InputStreamReader on a FileInputStream.

Example:

String encoding = "Cp1250";
File file = new File("foo.txt");

if (file.exists()) {
    try (BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream(file), encoding))) {
        String line = null;
        while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {
            System.out.println(line);
        }
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}
else {
    System.out.println("file doesn't exist");
}

In case you want to read the file character after character do not use BufferedReader.

try (InputStreamReader isr = new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream(file), encoding)) {
    int data = isr.read();
    while (data != -1) {
        System.out.print((char) data);
        data = isr.read();
    }
} catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

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