10

I would like to display the output - numbers 1 to 5, followed by 4-5 infinitely. Is there any way i can pass the value of i(4) instead of the character i in goto1. Or is there any other efficient way of realizing this without illustrating all the options as in switch(i.e case 1: goto1(c1) ,etc..).

The main aim is to jump to a statement whose label is computed within the program.

#define goto1(i) \
goto c##i

int main(){    
    c1 : printf(" num is 1 \n");
    c2 : printf(" num is 2 \n");
    c3 : printf(" num is 3 \n");
    c4 : printf(" num is 4 \n");
    c5 : printf(" num is 5 \n");

    int i=4;
    goto1(i);
}
4
  • 8
    I recommend taking a look at Definitive Book Guide
    – user1944441
    Commented Mar 29, 2013 at 11:30
  • 1
    It would help a lot if you changed the title, something like "Dynamic jump to label in C" or so.
    – Sentry
    Commented Mar 29, 2013 at 11:38
  • are you looking for trouble :) or maybe you are trying to go into the dark age, goto is always bad, even if you can handle it. small apps with goto might seem ok, but big ones will be confusing, and maybe not logical. go to is always ok with assembly of some hardware language, but with good coding godo seemed useless
    – aah134
    Commented Jul 7, 2013 at 6:00
  • Does this answer your question? Is it possible to store the address of a label in a variable and use goto to jump to it?
    – Bergi
    Commented Sep 24, 2023 at 1:10

5 Answers 5

15

If you are ... adventurous (or do I mean silly?), you can use a GCC extension Labels as Values.

6.3 Labels as Values

You can get the address of a label defined in the current function (or a containing function) with the unary operator ‘&&’. The value has type void *. This value is a constant and can be used wherever a constant of that type is valid. For example:

 void *ptr;
 /* ... */
 ptr = &&foo;

To use these values, you need to be able to jump to one. This is done with the computed goto statement1, goto *exp;. For example,

 goto *ptr;

Any expression of type void * is allowed.

One way of using these constants is in initializing a static array that serves as a jump table:

 static void *array[] = { &&foo, &&bar, &&hack };

Then you can select a label with indexing, like this:

 goto *array[i];

Note that this does not check whether the subscript is in bounds—array indexing in C never does that.

Such an array of label values serves a purpose much like that of the switch statement. The switch statement is cleaner, so use that rather than an array unless the problem does not fit a switch statement very well.

Another use of label values is in an interpreter for threaded code. The labels within the interpreter function can be stored in the threaded code for super-fast dispatching.

You may not use this mechanism to jump to code in a different function. If you do that, totally unpredictable things happen. The best way to avoid this is to store the label address only in automatic variables and never pass it as an argument.

An alternate way to write the above example is

 static const int array[] = { &&foo - &&foo, &&bar - &&foo,
                              &&hack - &&foo };
 goto *(&&foo + array[i]);

This is more friendly to code living in shared libraries, as it reduces the number of dynamic relocations that are needed, and by consequence, allows the data to be read-only.

The &&foo expressions for the same label might have different values if the containing function is inlined or cloned. If a program relies on them being always the same, __attribute__((__noinline__, __noclone__)) should be used to prevent inlining and cloning. If &&foo is used in a static variable initializer, inlining and cloning is forbidden.


Footnotes

[1] The analogous feature in Fortran is called an assigned goto, but that name seems inappropriate in C, where one can do more than simply store label addresses in label variables.

Under no circumstances should this be taken as a recommendation to use the feature. The computed goto was eventually removed from Fortran; it is best left in the dustbin of history.

0
6

Are you asking for a jump table? If you are using gcc: It has a jump table mechanism.

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    unsigned char data[] = { 1,2,3,4,5,4,5,0 };
    // data to "iterate" over, must be 0-terminated in this example

    void *jump_table[] = { &&L00, &&L01, &&L02, &&L03, &&L04, &&L05 };
    // you should fill this with all 256 possible values when using bytes as p-code

    unsigned char *p = data;

    begin:
        goto *jump_table[ *p ];

    L00:
        return 0; // end app
    L01:
        printf("num %i\n", (int)*p);
        goto next;
    L02:
        printf("num %i\n", (int)*p);
        goto next;
    L03:
        printf("num %i\n", (int)*p);
        goto next;
    L04:
        printf("num %i\n", (int)*p);
        goto next;
    L05:
        printf("num %i\n", (int)*p);
        goto next;
    L06:
    L07:
    // ...
    LFF:
        goto next;

    next:
        ++p;            // advance the data pointer to the next byte
        goto begin;     // start over

    return 0;
}

The pro about this method is that you spare the large switch statement.

0
3

Since you want to do this the wrong (aka. creative) way, have you considered trampolining?

#include <stdio.h>

typedef void (*generic)(void);
typedef generic (*continuation)(void);

generic first(void);
generic second(void);

int main(void) {
    continuation fubar = first;
    for (;;) {
        fubar = (continuation) fubar();
    }
}

generic first(void) {
    printf(" num is 1 \n"
           " num is 2 \n"
           " num is 3 \n");
    return (generic) second;
}

generic second(void) {
    printf(" num is 4 \n"
           " num is 5 \n");
    return (generic) second;
}

Continuing on from the idea of using function pointers (see what I did there? Giggity!), you could use an array of function pointers:

#include <stdio.h>

typedef size_t (*function)(size_t);

size_t first(size_t);
size_t second(size_t);

int main(void) {
    function function[] = { first, first, first, first, second };
    size_t index = 0;

    for (;;) {
        index = function[index](index);
    }
}

size_t first(size_t index) {
    printf(" num is %d \n", ++index);
    return index;
}

size_t second(size_t index) {
    printf(" num is %d \n", index+1);
    return index-1;
}
2
  • 1
    That's great and all, but I don't think it helps the OP. Commented Mar 29, 2013 at 12:18
  • @OliCharlesworth: Sure it does. Would you like me to demonstrate?
    – autistic
    Commented Mar 29, 2013 at 12:42
3

Wouldn't a switch accomplish the same thing?

int main()
{
    int i = 1;
    while (1)
    {
        switch (i)
        {
            case 1:
                printf(" num is 1 \n");
            case 2:
                printf(" num is 2 \n");
            case 3:
                printf(" num is 3 \n");
            case 4:
                printf(" num is 4 \n");
            case 5:
                printf(" num is 5 \n");
            default:
                break;
        }

        // code to calculate i
        i = 4;
        // end code to calculate i
    }
    return 0;
}
2
  • 1
    A switch is slow. It gets translated to (pseudo-assembly) if(i==0)...else if(i==1)... else ... if(i==10000). A jumptable is faster. Even calling functions from an array like myfunctionarray[i]() would be faster. Still you would have to define the maybe 10000 functions and insert them into the array ;-) Plain old goto serves the task probably best. (Look at tinyscheme, it's a wonderful example of a large, slow switch statement.) Commented Apr 16, 2013 at 21:52
  • @max.haredoom Depending on the cases, a switch statement is frequently implemented as a jump table, or in the case of a sparse set of labels, as a binary search. I strongly encourage you to write some code and look at the emitted assembly before you make such definitive (and incorrect) statements. Commented Sep 24, 2023 at 15:35
2

Why not do it like this?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void)
{
    printf(" num is 1 \n");
    printf(" num is 2 \n");
    printf(" num is 3 \n");

    for (;;){
        printf(" num is 4 \n");
        printf(" num is 5 \n");
    }

    /* Not reachable, but will silence any compiler warnings about main
     * not returning a value. */
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
5
  • am sorry but i wish to do it using goto itself or any other branching statement, if available. The main aim is to jump to a statement whose label is computed within the program.
    – ceedee
    Commented Mar 29, 2013 at 11:35
  • 1
    @ceedee Could you explain why you wish to do it using goto? Why use goto when a for loop will suffice in this case?
    – Alexandros
    Commented Mar 29, 2013 at 11:38
  • The main aim is to jump to a statement whose label is computed within the program. Am open to any other alternative that satisfies my requirement. Thanks..
    – ceedee
    Commented Mar 29, 2013 at 11:41
  • 1
    You're probably looking for a computed goto, which does not exist in the C standard, but gcc has an extension for it: gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-3.2/gcc/Labels-as-Values.html I wouldn't advice using one, however, unless you really know what you're doing.
    – Alexandros
    Commented Mar 29, 2013 at 11:44
  • @ceedee: Goto labels exist only at compile-time. You cannot jump to a label whose name is calculated at runtime (at least not in standard C). You would need to do something like switch (i) { case 1: goto c1; case 2: goto c2; ... }, but that's just silly! Commented Mar 29, 2013 at 11:44

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.