47

I am doing some tests measuring the performance of standard containers under various conditions, and I came across something odd. When I am inserting many items into the middle of a std::vector, if I first call reserve with the exact number of elements that I will be adding, I see essentially no performance difference in most circumstances compared with not calling reserve, which is surprising. More surprising, however, is that if I call reserve with the exact number of elements I need + 1, then I get a significant performance improvement. This is a sample table of results that I just got (all time are in seconds):

+---------------+--------+-------------------+-----------------------+
| # of elements | vector | vector (reserved) | vector (reserved + 1) |
+---------------+--------+-------------------+-----------------------+
|         10000 | 0.04   | 0.04              | 0.03                  |
|         20000 | 0.14   | 0.14              | 0.11                  |
|         30000 | 0.32   | 0.32              | 0.25                  |
|         40000 | 0.55   | 0.55              | 0.44                  |
|         50000 | 0.87   | 0.85              | 0.66                  |
|         60000 | 1.24   | 1.24              | 0.96                  |
|         70000 | 1.69   | 1.68              | 1.31                  |
|         80000 | 2.17   | 2.21              | 1.71                  |
|         90000 | 2.78   | 2.75              | 2.16                  |
|        100000 | 3.43   | 3.44              | 2.68                  |
|        110000 | 4.13   | 4.15              | 3.23                  |
|        120000 | 4.88   | 4.89              | 3.86                  |
|        130000 | 5.79   | 5.8               | 4.51                  |
|        140000 | 6.71   | 6.71              | 5.24                  |
|        150000 | 7.7    | 7.7               | 6.02                  |
|        160000 | 8.76   | 8.67              | 6.86                  |
|        170000 | 9.9    | 9.91              | 7.74                  |
|        180000 | 11.07  | 10.98             | 8.64                  |
|        190000 | 12.34  | 12.35             | 9.64                  |
|        200000 | 13.64  | 13.56             | 10.72                 |
|        210000 | 15.1   | 15.04             | 11.67                 |
|        220000 | 16.59  | 16.41             | 12.89                 |
|        230000 | 18.05  | 18.06             | 14.13                 |
|        240000 | 19.64  | 19.74             | 15.36                 |
|        250000 | 21.34  | 21.17             | 16.66                 |
|        260000 | 23.08  | 23.06             | 18.02                 |
|        270000 | 24.87  | 24.89             | 19.42                 |
|        280000 | 26.5   | 26.58             | 20.9                  |
|        290000 | 28.51  | 28.69             | 22.4                  |
|        300000 | 30.69  | 30.74             | 23.97                 |
|        310000 | 32.73  | 32.81             | 25.57                 |
|        320000 | 34.63  | 34.99             | 27.28                 |
|        330000 | 37.12  | 37.17             | 28.99                 |
|        340000 | 39.36  | 39.43             | 30.83                 |
|        350000 | 41.7   | 41.48             | 32.45                 |
|        360000 | 44.11  | 44.22             | 34.55                 |
|        370000 | 46.62  | 46.71             | 36.22                 |
|        380000 | 49.09  | 48.91             | 38.46                 |
|        390000 | 51.71  | 51.98             | 40.22                 |
|        400000 | 54.45  | 54.56             | 43.03                 |
|        410000 | 57.23  | 57.29             | 44.84                 |
|        420000 | 60     | 59.73             | 46.67                 |
|        430000 | 62.9   | 63.03             | 49.3                  |
+---------------+--------+-------------------+-----------------------+

I checked the implementation, and it doesn't appear to have an off-by-one error. I then further tested by printing the size and the capacity immediately after calling reserve, and then I printed them again after filling up the vector, and everything looks good.

before:
    size: 0
    capacity: 10000
after:
    size: 10000
    capacity: 10000

before:
    size: 0
    capacity: 20000
after:
    size: 20000
    capacity: 20000

...

Compiler is gcc 4.7.2 on Fedora Linux x86_64. Compiler options are -std=c++11 -Ofast -march=native -funsafe-loop-optimizations -flto=4 - fwhole-program

The code is below.

#include <algorithm>
#include <array>
#include <cstdint>
#include <vector>
#include <random>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

#include <boost/timer.hpp>

namespace {
constexpr size_t array_size = 1;

unsigned number() {
        static std::random_device rd;
        static std::mt19937 random_engine(rd());
        static std::uniform_int_distribution<uint32_t> distribution(0, std::numeric_limits<uint32_t>::max());
        return distribution(random_engine);
}

class Class {
        public:
                Class() {
                        x[0] = number();
                }
                std::string to_string() const {
                        return std::to_string(x[0]);
                }
                inline friend bool operator<=(Class const & lhs, Class const & rhs) {
                        return lhs.x[0] <= rhs.x[0];
                }
        private:
                std::array<uint32_t, array_size> x;
};

template<typename Container>
void add(Container & container, Class const & value) {
        auto const it = std::find_if(std::begin(container), std::end(container), [&](Class const & c) {
                return value <= c;
        });
        container.emplace(it, value);
}

// Do something with the result
template<typename Container>
void insert_to_file(Container const & container) {
        std::fstream file("file.txt");
        for (auto const & value : container) {
                file << value.to_string() << '\n';
        }
}

template<typename Container>
void f(std::vector<Class> const & values) {
        Container container;
        container.reserve(values.size());
        for (auto const & value : values) {
                add(container, value);
        }
        insert_to_file(container);
}

}

int main(int argc, char ** argv) {
        std::size_t const size = (argc == 1) ? 1 : std::stoul(argv[1]);
        // Default constructor of Class fills in values here
        std::vector<Class> const values_to_be_copied(size);
        typedef std::vector<Class> Container;
        boost::timer timer;
        f<Container>(values_to_be_copied);
        std::cerr << "Finished in " << timer.elapsed() << " seconds.\n";
}

I created a C++03 version to try and help other people reproduce it, but I cannot reproduce it in this version, despite trying to make it show the problem by making it as direct of a translation as possible:

#include <algorithm>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <fstream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

#include <boost/array.hpp>
#include <boost/cstdint.hpp>
#include <boost/lexical_cast.hpp>
#include <boost/random/mersenne_twister.hpp>
#include <boost/random/uniform_int_distribution.hpp>
#include <boost/timer.hpp>

namespace {
unsigned number() {
        static boost::random::mt19937 random_engine;
        static boost::random::uniform_int_distribution<boost::uint32_t> distribution(0, std::numeric_limits<boost::uint32_t>::max());
        return distribution(random_engine);
}

class Class {
        public:
                Class() {
                        x[0] = number();
                }
                inline friend bool operator<=(Class const & lhs, Class const & rhs) {
                        return lhs.x[0] <= rhs.x[0];
                }
                std::string to_string() const {
                        return boost::lexical_cast<std::string>(x[0]);
                }
        private:
                boost::array<boost::uint32_t, 1> x;
};

class Less {
public:
        Less(Class const & c):
                value(c) {
        }
        bool operator()(Class const & c) const {
                return value <= c;
        }
private:
        Class value;
};

void add(std::vector<Class> & container, Class const & value) {
        std::vector<Class>::iterator it = std::find_if(container.begin(), container.end(), Less(value));
        container.insert(it, value);
}

// Do something with the result
void insert_to_file(std::vector<Class> const & container) {
        std::fstream file("file.txt");
        for (std::vector<Class>::const_iterator it = container.begin(); it != container.end(); ++it) {
                file << it->to_string() << '\n';
        }
}

void f(std::vector<Class> const & values) {
        std::vector<Class> container;
        container.reserve(values.size() + 1);
        for (std::vector<Class>::const_iterator it = values.begin(); it != values.end(); ++it) {
                add(container, *it);
        }
        insert_to_file(container);
}

}

int main(int argc, char ** argv) {
        std::size_t const size = (argc == 1) ? 1 : boost::lexical_cast<std::size_t>(argv[1]);
        // Default constructor of Class fills in values here
        std::vector<Class> const values_to_be_copied(size);
        boost::timer timer;
        f(values_to_be_copied);
        std::cerr << "Finished in " << timer.elapsed() << " seconds.\n";
}

The line that currently calls reserve was changed to include a + 1 or was completely removed, depending on which test I was running. The entire thing was run from a shell script that started at 10000 elements and increased up to 430000 elements, going one version at a time.

My processor is an Intel i5 4-core processor, and I have 4 GiB of memory. I will try and simplify the C++11 version of the code as much as possible to see if I can isolate the problem.

Does anyone know why reserving one more element than I need is causing this increase in speed?

  • 1
    Unfortunately, cannot reproduce using gcc 4.7.2 on OSX x86_64 (same compiler options except that I had to remove -march=native). – NPE Mar 29 '13 at 16:54
  • 4
    Have you tried some other sizes other than those round numbers? – Mysticial Mar 29 '13 at 16:55
  • 2
    I find it stranger that reserving the correct size has no statistical effect on performance. – Drew Dormann Mar 29 '13 at 16:59
  • 2
    Reproduced, FC18, g++ (GCC) 4.7.2 20121109 (Red Hat 4.7.2-8), AMD Phenom II 1100T, so it's not a CPU thing. – TC1 Mar 29 '13 at 18:50
  • 3
    And the problem disappears (reserve() becomes as fast as reserve(+1)) if I drop the LTO flag. Might be a GCC bug, but I really don't know enough about LTO to investigate. – TC1 Mar 29 '13 at 19:03
16

I made the following modification to the program:

size_t a = getenv("A") ? 1 : 0;

void f(std::vector<Class> const & values) {
    ...
    container.reserve(values.size() + a);
    ...
}

Now the performance is same (fast) regardless if a is 0 or 1. The conclusion must be that the reservation of an extra item has no performance impact (which was assumed in the question). Also other small changes to the source code or compiler flags toggles the performance between fast and slow, so it looks like the code optimizer just has better luck in some cases than in others.

The following implementation of f() triggers the opposite behaviour with same compiler flags, thus it is fast when exact size is reserved and slow when an extra item is reserved:

template<typename Container>
void f(std::vector<Class> const & values) {
    Container container;
    container.reserve(values.size());
    for (auto it = values.begin(); it != values.end(); ++it) {
        add(container, *it);
    }
    insert_to_file(container);
}
  • -1, this doesn't answer the question or even contribute toward a reasonable explanation. – TC1 Apr 1 '13 at 13:15
  • 7
    It rules out the previous explanations. (a) The observed behaviour is not dependent on the actual reserved size. (b) It is not dependent on LTO being used or not. – smossen Apr 1 '13 at 14:21
  • Looks like a mismatching cost model for intel processors. Compile with -march=corei7 and the reserve +1 version will run faster, but only when run on core2. But both binaries will run with same performance on AMD. Compile with -march=k8 and it will be even faster when run on corei7 and not dependent on details such as +1 to reserve. – smossen Apr 2 '13 at 20:46
  • 4
    This is actually an ingenious proof and it does answer the question: The one addition element does nothing. This answer is under-appreciated by far. – usr Apr 2 '13 at 21:37
  • I think this is strong enough evidence to report an optimization bug to the gcc team. Now I just have to figure out why Visual Studio 2012 (with the array_size declared const instead of constexpr so it compiles) gives me the same performance with reserve vs. without, but much worse performance with reserve + 1... Either way, it seems that people don't use reserve often enough for compiler writers to test it thoroughly. – David Stone Apr 7 '13 at 2:32
0

I believe the difference between reserve of exact size vs one extra item in your specific case is absolutely negligible. Moreover, some implementations may truncate the requested size to some number (such as power of 2), hence there'll be no difference at all.

OTOH the performance bottleneck of your program seems to be something else. You perform two expensive array operations:

  • Search for the appropriate place for an element insertion
  • Insert a single element "in the middle"

As you probably noticed, your program depends on random. It's easy to see that in your specific case if random numbers are growing - your program will run faster, OTOH if they shrink - you'll have to perform more "expensive" insertions.

I guess that subtle code changes may trigger different random number generation.

  • 1
    1) The change is far from negligible, it's 15-20%. 2) The problem shows up when you enable LTO, which suggests that GCC messes up in that part. The fact that it's hard to reproduce (seeing as both versions it showed up on were Fedora 18, GCC 4.7.2) might hint toward it being a bug in that particular version / build, however. – TC1 Apr 1 '13 at 13:20
  • 1
    "Ceiling" of requested size may occur, but not truncation, since the implementation must guarantee that no further allocation occurs until the reserved size is reached. – YvesgereY Apr 3 '13 at 17:37

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