5

I'm looking for and if-in statement like Python has for Ruby.

Essentially, if x in an_array do

This is the code I was working on, where the variable "line" is an array.

def distance(destination, location, line)
  if destination and location in line
    puts "You have #{(n.index(destination) - n.index(location)).abs} stops to go"
  end
end
3
  • 2
    "destination and location in line", this means both destination and location must be in line? that's not how you'd write in python neither.
    – tokland
    Commented Mar 29, 2013 at 21:35
  • 1
    As in "both destination and location are in line" or as in "destination is true, and location is in line"?
    – Linuxios
    Commented Mar 29, 2013 at 21:35
  • As in both destination and location are in an array called line. Commented Mar 31, 2013 at 1:09

5 Answers 5

4
if line.include?(destination) && line.include?(location)

if [destination,location].all?{ |o| line.include?(o) }

if ([destination,location] & line).length == 2

The first is the most clear, but least DRY.

The last is the least clear, but fastest when you have multiple items to check. (It is O(m+n) vs O(m*n).)

I'd personally use the middle one, unless speed was of paramount importance.

1
  • Well, your last method is probably faster so +1.
    – squiguy
    Commented Mar 29, 2013 at 21:44
2

How about using include?

def distance(destination, location, line)
  if line.any? { |x| [destination, location].include?(x) }
    puts "You have #{(n.index(destination) - n.index(location)).abs} stops to go"
  end
end
0
1

You can use Enumerable#include? -which looks a bit ugly- or create your own abstraction so you can write write how you think about the operation:

class Object
  def in?(enumerable)
    enumerable.include?(self)
  end
end


2.in?([1, 2, 3]) #=> true
0

Ruby supports set operations. If you want concise/terse, you can do:

%w[a b c d e f] & ['f']
=> ['f']

Turning that into a boolean is easy:

!(%w[a b c d e f] & ['f']).empty?
=> true
0

If it is that you want to ensure that both destination and location are in line, I'd go with one intersect in preference to two ".include?" checks:

def distance(destination, location, line)
  return if ([destination, location] - line).any? # when you subtract all of the stops from the two you want, if there are any left it would indicate that your two weren't in the original set
  puts "You have #{(line.index(destination) - line.index(location)).abs} stops to go"
end

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