pow1 b e  
| (e == 0)  = 1  
| otherwise = b * pow1 b (e-1)

I have exactly that code in a .hs file and when loading I always get the same parse error. I don't think it actually contains any mistakes - so my current thought is that the "|" sign isn't the one haskell wants, but it's the standard one on my Macbook Keyboard (using Mac OS). Is it possible, and if so how do I go around it? I'm currently using TextEdit to write the code, with the plain text setting on.

  • 2
    I highly recommend using a good editor for Haskell (Vim, Emacs, Sublime Text 2) rather than TextEdit. – user142019 Mar 30 '13 at 0:25

Be sure to indent the guards; Haskell has significant whitespace.

pow1 b e
    | (e == 0)  = 1
    | otherwise = b * pow1 b (e-1)
  • 3
    And to add that: indent with spaces, not tabs. (e.g. make sure your editor converts tabs to spaces.) – huon Mar 30 '13 at 3:45
  • 2
    Haskell has significant whitespace, unless you want to write your code with brackets everywhere – amindfv Mar 30 '13 at 22:08

All you need to do is to add spaces in front of the guards and the code will work fine.

pow1 b e  
    | (e == 0)  = 1  
    | otherwise = b * pow1 b (e-1)

(user142019 already stated this solution, however I felt a explanation is needed to understand the solution)

Explanation:

Haskell uses space-indentations to control the structure and scope of it's code. Other programming languages (like Java for instance) rely on curly brackets to do this, Haskell has indentations instead.

Your code does not work because Haskell expects function body to be on a deeper indentation level than the function definition, and other function definitions on the same level. Any new line on the same indentation level would be attempted to be interpreted as a new function definition, who are not allowed to start with a guard | hence the parse error you get.

There is nothing wrong with you Mac character key nor with your Text editor.

On the topic of indentations: tabs will not work. So you will have to enter spaces manually or change the tab settings of your editor to insert 4 spaces (I'd recomend) instead of a tab character. (Notepad++ allows this for example, it's my prefered choice for use with Haskell).

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