4

Meaning that I simply want to strip the enclosing braces. I can match "{ this kind of stuff }" with:

"{stuff}".match(/{([^}]*)}/)[1]

Am I asking too much here?

Another example, I've got this javascript code as string:

{
    var foo = {
        bar: 1    
    };

    var foo2 = {
        bar: 2    
    };
}

I want to strip only the outside braces:

var foo = {
    bar: 1
};

var foo2 = {
    bar: 2
}
  • 1
    Match opening braces, closing braces, and anything else as three different tokens. Then iterate them to find the closing brace to your opening brace. – Gumbo Mar 30 '13 at 10:32
1

I agree with Lucero that Regexes are not made for that, but to answer your question:

The problem is that you match everything except }. But since the inside data you want to match contains itself a }, the content of the outer braces is not matched.

{
    var foo = {
        bar: 1
==> };

    var foo2 = {
        bar: 2    
==> };
}

You can use this regex:

{([\S\s]*)}

To explain:

{                   match opening {
    (               group
        [\S\s]      match everything, workaround for the missing s option in JS
              *     greedy, makes it match as much as possible
    )               end group
}                   match closing }
  • Escape the curly braces! \{([\S\s]*)\} – MikeM Mar 30 '13 at 12:14
  • Excellent! With that and @MikeM's help, it works beautifully. E.g., this gives me exactly what I was looking for: "{ Please enter your {field} here: }".match(/\{([\S\s]*)\}/)[1]. Thanks guys! – DonVaughn Mar 30 '13 at 13:02
  • Escaping the curly braces is not necessary here. JavaScript does not mistake it for a quantity specification because (a) there is no preceding character and (b) the content does not match a quantity specification. Many regular expressions are hard to understand already so I would avoid cluttering them up with unnecessary escape characters. – David Mar 30 '13 at 13:26
  • Fair enough, David, the escaping isn't required here. But (a) is incorrect, and your suggestion that the escaping makes the regex harder to understand is dubious at best. – MikeM Mar 30 '13 at 18:42
  • {([\S\s]*)} looks cleaner to me than \{([\S\s]*)\}. Also, according to ECMA 262 RegExp syntax definition (page 180-182), a quantifier can only exist after an atom. That and the syntax of a qualifier proves (a) and (b) to be correct. – David Mar 30 '13 at 19:53
8

Try this (I based my code on this answer). It also knows to ignore brackets in strings and comments (single-line and multi-line) - as noted in the comment section of that answer:

var block = /* code block */
    startIndex = /* index of first bracket */,
    currPos = startIndex,
    openBrackets = 0,
    stillSearching = true,
    waitForChar = false;

while (stillSearching && currPos <= block.length) {
  var currChar = block.charAt(currPos);

  if (!waitForChar) {
    switch (currChar) {
      case '{':
        openBrackets++; 
        break;
      case '}':
        openBrackets--;
        break;
      case '"':
      case "'":
        waitForChar = currChar;
        break;
      case '/':
        var nextChar = block.charAt(currPos + 1);
        if (nextChar === '/') {
          waitForChar = '\n';
        } else if (nextChar === '*') {
          waitForChar = '*/';
        }
    }
  } else {
    if (currChar === waitForChar) {
      if (waitForChar === '"' || waitForChar === "'") {
        block.charAt(currPos - 1) !== '\\' && (waitForChar = false);
      } else {
        waitForChar = false;
      }
    } else if (currChar === '*') {
      block.charAt(currPos + 1) === '/' && (waitForChar = false);
    }
  }

  currPos++ 
  if (openBrackets === 0) { stillSearching = false; } 
}

console.log(block.substring(startIndex , currPos)); // contents of the outermost brackets incl. everything inside
  • Small note: this doesn't handle escaped quotes inside quotes. Eg: {" \" "} – nevada_scout Jan 12 '17 at 17:31
2

Regexes are not made for that, and only a few dialects (PCRE and .NET Regex) can cope with recursive structures - JS regex cannot.

So yes, you're asking for too much. Use a JSON parser instead.

  • Lucero, as I showed in the update, it's not only JSON compliant stuff I'm doing. I appreciate the input, tho. I guess I'll need to find another way. – DonVaughn Mar 30 '13 at 10:48
  • Not sure why I got downvoted twice, I'd be grateful to get feedback as comment. – Lucero May 11 '15 at 16:51

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