1

In PySide, I want to emit a signal with the class that defines the signal as a parameter. E.g.:

class MyWidget(QtGui.QWidget):

    signal_widget_closed = QtCore.Signal(MyWidget)

    def close(self):
        super(MyWidget, self).close()
        self.signal_widget_closed.emit(self)

However, the second line gives a NameError because MyWidget doesn't exist yet at that point. For now I work around the issue by emitting a QWidget like this

    signal_widget_closed = QtCore.Signal(QtGui.QWidget)

but I would prefer a solution with MyWidget as type. Any ideas?

1

You just don't need this parameter.
Use QObject::sender inside a slot to find out which object emitted the signal.

  • This wouldn't work if I then call the slot as a normal procedure (or I would have to implement functionality for both cases separately). The page you linked to warns for this and says: "This function violates the object-oriented principle of modularity." Still, it's good to know about this option. Thanks for mentioning it. – titusjan Mar 30 '13 at 11:45
  • @titusjan The only solution seems to be using metaclasses, and I can say that's not worth it. Maybe try to rethink the architecture of your application. – Oleh Prypin Mar 30 '13 at 12:01
  • Basically you need to reference the class inside itself. But the solution to just add the signal after the class definition will not work because PySide seems to use metaclasses to read those signals just after the class is defined... – Oleh Prypin Mar 30 '13 at 12:12
1

It is possible to define a signal after the class definition.

Your code would look like:

class MyWidget(QtGui.QWidget):
    def close(self):
        super(MyWidget, self).close()
        self.signal_widget_closed.emit(self)
MyWidget.signal_widget_closed = QtCore.Signal(MyWidget)

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