10

I am iterating through a list. An element could be added to this list during an iteration. So the problem is that the loop only iterates through the original length of this list.

My code:

    i = 1
    for p in srcPts[1:]:  # skip the first item.
        pt1 = srcPts[i - 1]["Point"]
        pt2 = p["Point"]

        d = MathUtils.distance(pt1, pt2)
        if (D + d) >= I:
            qx = pt1.X + ((I - D) / d) * (pt2.X - pt1.X)
            qy = pt1.Y + ((I - D) / d) * (pt2.Y - pt1.Y)
            q  = Point(float(qx), float(qy))
            # Append new point q.
            dstPts.append(q)
            # Insert 'q' at position i in points s.t. 'q' will be the next i.
            srcPts.insert(i, {"Point": q})
            D = 0.0
        else:
            D += d
        i += 1

I've tried using for i in range(1, len(srcPts)): but again the range stays the same even after more items have been added to the list.

3 Answers 3

10

You need to use a while loop instead in this case:

i = 1
while i < len(srcPts):
    # ...
    i += 1

A for loop creates an iterator for your list, once. And once created that iterator does not know that you altered the list in the loop. The while variant shown here recalculates the length each time instead.

4
  • 1
    Well, that's not true. Python allows you to change list you're iterating over. In fact, when you append to a list it will scan through this added element; the same for inserting elements. To make a copy of your list for iterating over it you can write for i in lst[:]: or do other tricks. More on this here. Mar 1, 2014 at 16:30
  • @SergeyIvanov: I didn't say Python doesn't allow you to, I said the for loop doesn't know the list was altered. Note that the OP already used slicing here. He is looping over a partial copy (all but the 1st element).
    – Martijn Pieters
    Mar 1, 2014 at 16:31
  • @SergeyIvanov: And that is the point here; the OP wants the loop to include the added elements, inserted in the loop body.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Mar 1, 2014 at 16:32
  • I see. I point out that for loop knows that you changed iterator/list when you don't create a copy and thus can iterate over those new added elements. When you do slicing however, you create a copy and cannot iterate over new elements. Mar 1, 2014 at 16:41
7

The problem is that len(srcPts) is only computed once, when you pass it as an argument to the range generator. So you need to have a terminating condition that repeatedly evaluates the current length of srcPts during each iteration. There's many ways to do this, such as :

while i < len(srcPts):


  ....
1
  • Thanks, I'm such a Python noob.
    – icanc
    Mar 31, 2013 at 1:48
2

In the line:

for p in srcPts[1:]:  # skip the first item.

slicing makes a new copy of scrPtrs, so it is fixed size.

Disclaimer: It feels wrong to modify a list being iterator over, yet this works...

Create an iterator over the list prevents the copy and still allows items to be added and inserted:

L = [1,2,2,3,4,5,2,2,6]
it = iter(L)
next(it) # skip the first item
for i,p in enumerate(it,1):
    if p == 2:
        L.insert(i+1,7) # insert a 7 as the next item after each 2
    print(p)

Output:

2
7
2
7
3
4
5
2
7
2
7
6

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