130

Some users are reporting, if they use the quick action in the notification bar, they are getting a force close.

I show a quick action in the notification who calls the "TestDialog" class. In the TestDialog class after pressing the button "snooze", I will show the SnoozeDialog.

private View.OnClickListener btnSnoozeOnClick() {
    return new View.OnClickListener() {

        public void onClick(View v) {
            showSnoozeDialog();
        }
    };
}

private void showSnoozeDialog() {
    FragmentManager fm = getSupportFragmentManager();
    SnoozeDialog snoozeDialog = new SnoozeDialog();
    snoozeDialog.show(fm, "snooze_dialog");
}

The error is *IllegalStateException: Can not perform this action after onSaveInstanceState*.

The code line where the IllegarStateException gets fired is:

snoozeDialog.show(fm, "snooze_dialog");

The class is extending "FragmentActivity" and the "SnoozeDialog" class is extending "DialogFragment".

Here is the complete stack trace of the error:

java.lang.IllegalStateException: Can not perform this action after onSaveInstanceState
at android.support.v4.app.FragmentManagerImpl.checkStateLoss(FragmentManager.java:1327)
at android.support.v4.app.FragmentManagerImpl.enqueueAction(FragmentManager.java:1338)
at android.support.v4.app.BackStackRecord.commitInternal(BackStackRecord.java:595)
at android.support.v4.app.BackStackRecord.commit(BackStackRecord.java:574)
at android.support.v4.app.DialogFragment.show(DialogFragment.java:127)
at com.test.testing.TestDialog.f(TestDialog.java:538)
at com.test.testing.TestDialog.e(TestDialog.java:524)
at com.test.testing.TestDialog.d(TestDialog.java:519)
at com.test.testing.g.onClick(TestDialog.java:648)
at android.view.View.performClick(View.java:3620)
at android.view.View$PerformClick.run(View.java:14292)
at android.os.Handler.handleCallback(Handler.java:605)
at android.os.Handler.dispatchMessage(Handler.java:92)
at android.os.Looper.loop(Looper.java:137)
at android.app.ActivityThread.main(ActivityThread.java:4507)
at java.lang.reflect.Method.invokeNative(Native Method)
at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:511)
at com.android.internal.os.ZygoteInit$MethodAndArgsCaller.run(ZygoteInit.java:790)
at com.android.internal.os.ZygoteInit.main(ZygoteInit.java:557)
at dalvik.system.NativeStart.main(Native Method)

I can't reproduce this error, but I am getting a lot of error reports.

Can anybody help that how can I fix this error?

8
  • 2
    Did you found a solution? I have the same problem as you. I've asked here: stackoverflow.com/questions/15730878/… Please check my question and see the possible solution which is not working for my case. Maybe it will work for you. – rootpanthera Apr 1 '13 at 15:19
  • No solution yet :-( And your suggestion is already added to my class. – chrisonline Apr 2 '13 at 11:20
  • Check the accepted answer from here. This solved my issue: stackoverflow.com/questions/14177781/… – bogdan Jul 16 '13 at 11:45
  • 4
    Is your Activity visible when this dialog is triggered? It sounds like this may be caused by your app trying to display a dialog attached to an Activity that has been paused/stopped. – Kai Sep 6 '14 at 6:27
  • 1
    I solve my same problem by changing some design to use childFragmentManager instead of supportFragmentManager. This error was occurring after orientation change when I try to show dialog. – Rahul Dec 28 '20 at 3:16

17 Answers 17

70

This is common issue. We solved this issue by overriding show() and handling exception in DialogFragment extended class

public class CustomDialogFragment extends DialogFragment {

    @Override
    public void show(FragmentManager manager, String tag) {
        try {
            FragmentTransaction ft = manager.beginTransaction();
            ft.add(this, tag);
            ft.commit();
        } catch (IllegalStateException e) {
            Log.d("ABSDIALOGFRAG", "Exception", e);
        }
    }
}

Note that applying this method will not alter the internal fields of the DialogFragment.class:

boolean mDismissed;
boolean mShownByMe;

This may lead to unexpected results in some cases. Better use commitAllowingStateLoss() instead of commit()

7
  • 3
    But why does this issue occur? Is it ok to ignore the error? What happens when you do? After all, when clicking, it means that the activity is live and well... Anyway, I've reported about this here because I consider this a bug: code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=207269 – android developer Apr 19 '16 at 9:39
  • 1
    Can you please star and/or comment there, then? – android developer Apr 19 '16 at 21:35
  • 3
    it's better to call super.show(manager, tag) inside try-catch clause. The flags owned by DialogFragment can stay safe this way – Shayan_Aryan Jan 16 '17 at 10:33
  • 23
    At this point you can call commitAllowingStateLoss() instead of commit(). The Exception would not be raised. – ARLabs Jan 30 '17 at 17:58
  • 4
    You just added a try-catch block, that's not a solution for the problem, you're just covering a mistake. – Dimas Mendes Oct 18 '18 at 23:21
28

That mean you commit() (show() in case of DialogFragment) fragment after onSaveInstanceState().

Android will save your fragment state at onSaveInstanceState(). So, if you commit() fragment after onSaveInstanceState() fragment state will be lost.

As a result, if Activity get killed and recreate later the fragment will not add to activity which is bad user experience. That's why Android does not allow state loss at all costs.

The easy solution is to check whether state already saved.

boolean mIsStateAlreadySaved = false;
boolean mPendingShowDialog = false;

@Override
public void onResumeFragments(){
    super.onResumeFragments();
    mIsStateAlreadySaved = false;
    if(mPendingShowDialog){
        mPendingShowDialog = false;
        showSnoozeDialog();
    }
}

@Override
public void onPause() {
    super.onPause();
    mIsStateAlreadySaved = true;
}

private void showSnoozeDialog() {
    if(mIsStateAlreadySaved){
        mPendingShowDialog = true;
    }else{
        FragmentManager fm = getSupportFragmentManager();
        SnoozeDialog snoozeDialog = new SnoozeDialog();
        snoozeDialog.show(fm, "snooze_dialog");
    }
}

Note: onResumeFragments() will call when fragments resumed.

22
  • 1
    What if I want to show the DialogFragment within another fragment? – android developer May 6 '15 at 10:38
  • Our solution is create activity and fragment base class and delegate onResumeFragments to fragment (we create onResumeFragments in fragment base class). It is not nice solution but it does work. If you have any better solution please let me know :) – Pongpat May 6 '15 at 12:32
  • Well, I thought that showing the dialog in the "onStart" should work fine, since the fragment is surely being shown, but I still see some crash reports about it. I was instructed to try to put it on the "onResume" instead. About alternatives, I saw this: twigstechtips.blogspot.co.il/2014/01/… , but it's quite weird. – android developer May 6 '15 at 13:28
  • I think the reason that twigstechtips.blogspot.co.il/2014/01/… work because it start new thread and hence all the lifecycle code i.e. onStart, onResume, etc. called before code runOnUiThread ever run. That mean the state already restore before runOnUiThread called. – Pongpat May 6 '15 at 14:48
  • 2
    I use single call to post(runnable). Regarding getFragmentManager, it depends. If you want to share that dialog with another activity you should use getFragmentManager, however, if that dialog only exist with fragment getChildFragmentManager seem a better choice. – Pongpat May 7 '15 at 11:12
21
private void showSnoozeDialog() {
    FragmentManager fm = getSupportFragmentManager();
    SnoozeDialog snoozeDialog = new SnoozeDialog();
    // snoozeDialog.show(fm, "snooze_dialog");
    FragmentTransaction ft = getSupportFragmentManager().beginTransaction();
    ft.add(snoozeDialog, "snooze_dialog");
    ft.commitAllowingStateLoss();
}

ref: link

17

Using the new lifecycle scopes of Activity-KTX its as simple as the following code sample:

lifecycleScope.launchWhenResumed {
   showErrorDialog(...)
}

This method can directly be called after onStop() and will successfully show the dialog once onResume() has been called upon returning.

1
16

After few days I want share my solution how I've fixed it, to show DialogFragment you should to override show() method of it and call commitAllowingStateLoss() on Transaction object. Here is example in Kotlin:

override fun show(manager: FragmentManager?, tag: String?) {
        try {
            val ft = manager?.beginTransaction()
            ft?.add(this, tag)
            ft?.commitAllowingStateLoss()
        } catch (ignored: IllegalStateException) {

        }

    }
1
  • 3
    So that developers don't have to inherit from DialogFragment you could change this to be a Kotlin extension function with the following signature: fun DialogFragment.showAllowingStateLoss(fragmentManager: FragmentManager, tag: String). Also, the try-catch is not necessary since you're calling the commitAllowingStateLoss() method and not the commit() method. – Adil Hussain Aug 2 '19 at 18:23
10

If the dialog is not really important (it is okay to not-show it when the app closed/is no longer in view), use:

boolean running = false;

@Override
public void onStart() {
    running = true;
    super.onStart();
}

@Override
public void onStop() {
    running = false;
    super.onStop();
}

And open your dialog(fragment) only when we're running:

if (running) {
    yourDialog.show(...);
}

EDIT, PROBABLY BETTER SOLUTION:

Where onSaveInstanceState is called in the lifecycle is unpredictable, I think a better solution is to check on isSavedInstanceStateDone() like this:

/**
 * True if SavedInstanceState was done, and activity was not restarted or resumed yet.
 */
private boolean savedInstanceStateDone;

@Override
protected void onResume() {
    super.onResume();

    savedInstanceStateDone = false;
}

@Override
protected void onStart() {
    super.onStart();

    savedInstanceStateDone = false;
}

protected void onSaveInstanceState(Bundle outState) {
    super.onSaveInstanceState(outState);
    savedInstanceStateDone = true;
}


/**
 * Returns true if SavedInstanceState was done, and activity was not restarted or resumed yet.
 */
public boolean isSavedInstanceStateDone() {
    return savedInstanceStateDone;
}
2
  • This doesn't seem to work, as I get this exception on the "onStart" method call (trying to show the DialogFragment there). – android developer May 6 '15 at 10:38
  • You saved my day. Thank you Frank. – Cüneyt Feb 29 '16 at 13:57
10

I have run in to this problem for years.
The Internets are littered with scores (hundreds? thousands?) of discussions about this, and confusion and disinformation in them seems aplenty.
To make the situation worse, and in the spirit of the xkcd "14 standards" comic, I am throwing in my answer in to the ring.
xkcd 14 standards

The cancelPendingInputEvents(), commitAllowingStateLoss(), catch (IllegalStateException e), and similar solutions all seem atrocious.

Hopefully the following easily shows how to reproduce and fix the problem:

private static final Handler sHandler = new Handler();
private boolean mIsAfterOnSaveInstanceState = true;

@Override
protected void onSaveInstanceState(Bundle outState)
{
    super.onSaveInstanceState(outState);
    mIsAfterOnSaveInstanceState = true; // <- To repro, comment out this line
}

@Override
protected void onPostResume()
{
    super.onPostResume();
    mIsAfterOnSaveInstanceState = false;
}

@Override
protected void onResume()
{
    super.onResume();
    sHandler.removeCallbacks(test);
}

@Override
protected void onPause()
{
    super.onPause();
    sHandler.postDelayed(test, 5000);
}

Runnable test = new Runnable()
{
    @Override
    public void run()
    {
        if (mIsAfterOnSaveInstanceState)
        {
            // TODO: Consider saving state so that during or after onPostResume a dialog can be shown with the latest text
            return;
        }

        FragmentManager fm = getSupportFragmentManager();
        DialogFragment dialogFragment = (DialogFragment) fm.findFragmentByTag("foo");
        if (dialogFragment != null)
        {
            dialogFragment.dismiss();
        }

        dialogFragment = GenericPromptSingleButtonDialogFragment.newInstance("title", "message", "button");
        dialogFragment.show(fm, "foo");

        sHandler.postDelayed(test, 5000);
    }
};
4
  • 3
    I love people that down vote with no explanation. Instead of just down voting, maybe it would be better if they explain how my solution is flawed? Can I down vote a down voter's down vote? – swooby Jun 22 '18 at 21:40
  • 1
    Yes, it's a problem of SO, I write this problem every time in suggestions, but they don't want to solve. – CoolMind Feb 1 '19 at 8:00
  • 3
    I think downvotes may be a result of the embedded XKCD, answers really aren't the place for social comments, (no matter how funny and/or true). – RestingRobot Mar 21 '19 at 19:03
  • Should this be on a BaseFragment(BaseActivity) or CustomDialogFragment or myFragment which is extends BaseFragment ? – fatihberatcan Mar 9 at 11:06
6

please try to use FragmentTransaction instead of FragmentManager. I think the below code will solve your problem. If not, Please let me know.

FragmentTransaction ft = getSupportFragmentManager().beginTransaction();
SnoozeDialog snoozeDialog = new SnoozeDialog();
snoozeDialog.show(ft, "snooze_dialog");

EDIT:

Fragment Transaction

Please check this link. I think it will solve you queries.

4
  • 4
    Any explanation on why using FragmentTransaction fixes the issue would be great. – Hemanshu Feb 10 '14 at 7:56
  • 4
    Dialog#show(FragmentManager, tag) does the same thing. This is not a solution. – William Dec 6 '14 at 7:29
  • 4
    This answer is not the solution. DialogFragment#show(ft) and show(fm) do the exact same thing. – danijoo Feb 2 '15 at 9:28
  • @danijoo You're right that both of that does the same job. But in few phones, there is some problem similar to this if you are using fragmentmanager instead of fragmenttransaction. So in my case, this solved my issue. – RIJO RV Feb 2 '15 at 10:06
6

Make your dialog fragment object global and call dismissAllowingStateLoss() in onPause() method

@Override
protected void onPause() {
    super.onPause();

    if (dialogFragment != null) {
        dialogFragment.dismissAllowingStateLoss();
    }
}

Don't forget to assign value in fragment and call show() on button click or where ever.

3

Many views post high-level events such as click handlers to the event queue to run deferred. So the problem is that "onSaveInstanceState" has already been called for the Activity but the event queue contains deferred "click event". Hence when this event is dispatched to your handler

at android.os.Handler.handleCallback(Handler.java:605)
at android.os.Handler.dispatchMessage(Handler.java:92)
at android.os.Looper.loop(Looper.java:137)

and your code does show the IllegalStateException is thrown.

The simplest solution is to clean event queue, in onSaveInstanceState

protected void onSaveInstanceState(Bundle outState) {
        super.onSaveInstanceState(outState);
        // ..... do some work
        if (Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= Build.VERSION_CODES.KITKAT) {
            findViewById(android.R.id.content).cancelPendingInputEvents();
        }
}
3
  • Have you actually confirmed that this solves the problem? – mhsmith Aug 31 '19 at 22:06
  • Google has added this to the next release of the androidx libraries, currently in beta (activity and fragment). – mhsmith Aug 31 '19 at 23:55
  • 1
    @mhsmith I do remember that this solution solved problem in my code with IllegalStateException – sim Sep 2 '19 at 5:09
3

use this code

FragmentTransaction ft = fm.beginTransaction();
        ft.add(yourFragment, "fragment_tag");
        ft.commitAllowingStateLoss();

instead of

yourFragment.show(fm, "fragment_tag");
2

I have found an elegant solution for this problem by using reflection. Problem of all above solutions is that fields mDismissed and mShownByMe do not change their state.

Just override method "show" in your own custom bottom sheet dialog fragment like sample below (Kotlin)

override fun show(manager: FragmentManager, tag: String?) {
        val mDismissedField = DialogFragment::class.java.getDeclaredField("mDismissed")
        mDismissedField.isAccessible = true
        mDismissedField.setBoolean(this, false)

        val mShownByMeField = DialogFragment::class.java.getDeclaredField("mShownByMe")
        mShownByMeField.isAccessible = true
        mShownByMeField.setBoolean(this, true)

        manager.beginTransaction()
                .add(this, tag)
                .commitAllowingStateLoss()
    }
3
  • 5
    "I have found an elegant solution for this problem by using reflection." how is it elegant? – Mark Buikema Feb 10 '20 at 8:32
  • elegant, stylish, chic, smart, nice, graceful – Рома Богдан Feb 10 '20 at 15:09
  • 2
    it is the only solution that worked for me. I think it is elegant – MBH Jul 15 '20 at 7:12
2

If you override show() function, DON'T DO THIS:

override fun show(manager: FragmentManager, tag: String?) {
    // mDismissed = false; is removed -> lead to wrong state
    // mShownByMe = true; is removed -> lead to wrong state
    val ft = manager.beginTransaction()
    ft.add(this, tag)
    ft.commitAllowingStateLoss()
}

It maybe lead to wrong state of dialog

Just do:

override fun show(manager: FragmentManager, tag: String?) {
    try {
        super.show(manager, tag)
    } catch (e: Exception) {
        val ft = manager.beginTransaction()
        ft.add(this, tag)
        ft.commitAllowingStateLoss()
    }
}
1
  • I just use fragmentTransaction in any case ;) – Ben-J Nov 27 '20 at 9:25
1

Though it's not officially mentioned anywhere but I faced this problem couple of times. In my experience there is something wrong in compatibility library supporting fragments on older platforms which causes this problem. You use test this by using normal fragment manager API. If nothing works then you can use the normal dialog instead of dialog fragment.

1
  1. Add this class to your project: (must be in android.support.v4.app package)
package android.support.v4.app;


/**
 * Created by Gil on 8/16/2017.
 */

public class StatelessDialogFragment extends DialogFragment {
    /**
     * Display the dialog, adding the fragment using an existing transaction and then committing the
     * transaction whilst allowing state loss.
* * I would recommend you use {@link #show(FragmentTransaction, String)} most of the time but * this is for dialogs you reallly don't care about. (Debug/Tracking/Adverts etc.) * * @param transaction * An existing transaction in which to add the fragment. * @param tag * The tag for this fragment, as per * {@link FragmentTransaction#add(Fragment, String) FragmentTransaction.add}. * @return Returns the identifier of the committed transaction, as per * {@link FragmentTransaction#commit() FragmentTransaction.commit()}. * @see StatelessDialogFragment#showAllowingStateLoss(FragmentManager, String) */ public int showAllowingStateLoss(FragmentTransaction transaction, String tag) { mDismissed = false; mShownByMe = true; transaction.add(this, tag); mViewDestroyed = false; mBackStackId = transaction.commitAllowingStateLoss(); return mBackStackId; } /** * Display the dialog, adding the fragment to the given FragmentManager. This is a convenience * for explicitly creating a transaction, adding the fragment to it with the given tag, and * committing it without careing about state. This does not add the transaction to the * back stack. When the fragment is dismissed, a new transaction will be executed to remove it * from the activity.
* * I would recommend you use {@link #show(FragmentManager, String)} most of the time but this is * for dialogs you reallly don't care about. (Debug/Tracking/Adverts etc.) * * * @param manager * The FragmentManager this fragment will be added to. * @param tag * The tag for this fragment, as per * {@link FragmentTransaction#add(Fragment, String) FragmentTransaction.add}. * @see StatelessDialogFragment#showAllowingStateLoss(FragmentTransaction, String) */ public void showAllowingStateLoss(FragmentManager manager, String tag) { mDismissed = false; mShownByMe = true; FragmentTransaction ft = manager.beginTransaction(); ft.add(this, tag); ft.commitAllowingStateLoss(); } }
  1. Extend StatelessDialogFragment instead of DialogFragment
  2. Use the method showAllowingStateLoss instead of show

  3. Enjoy ;)

3
  • What is these all boolean fields for?Why aren't they declared as class members? – undefined Sep 6 '17 at 7:21
  • 1
    The boolean fields are protected members of DialogFragment, their names obviously suggest what they are for and we need to update them in order to not interfere with the logic of DialogFragment. Note that in the original DialogFragment class, this functions exist but without public access – Gil SH Sep 7 '17 at 6:47
  • Ough these members are not protected, they are internal.I was getting compile errors as I put StatelessDialogFragment inside one of my packages.Thanks dude.I'll test it in production soon. – undefined Sep 7 '17 at 14:39
0

The following implementation can be used to solve the problem of performing safely state changes during the Activity lifecycle, in particular for showing dialogs: if the instance state has already been saved (e.g. due to a configuration change), it postpones them until the resumed state has been performed.

public abstract class XAppCompatActivity extends AppCompatActivity {

    private String TAG = this.getClass().getSimpleName();

    /** The retained fragment for this activity */
    private ActivityRetainFragment retainFragment;

    /** If true the instance state has been saved and we are going to die... */
    private boolean instanceStateSaved;

    @Override
    protected void onPostCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onPostCreate(savedInstanceState);

        // get hold of retain Fragment we'll be using
        retainFragment = ActivityRetainFragment.get(this, "Fragment-" + this.getClass().getName());
    }

    @Override
    protected void onPostResume() {
        super.onPostResume();

        // reset instance saved state
        instanceStateSaved = false;

        // execute all the posted tasks
        for (ActivityTask task : retainFragment.tasks) task.exec(this);
        retainFragment.tasks.clear();
    }

    @Override
    protected void onSaveInstanceState(Bundle outState) {
        super.onSaveInstanceState(outState);
        instanceStateSaved = true;
    }

    /**
     * Checks if the activity state has been already saved.
     * After that event we are no longer allowed to commit fragment transactions.
     * @return true if the instance state has been saved
     */
    public boolean isInstanceStateSaved() {
        return instanceStateSaved;
    }

    /**
     * Posts a task to be executed when the activity state has not yet been saved
     * @param task The task to be executed
     * @return true if the task executed immediately, false if it has been queued
     */
    public final boolean post(ActivityTask task)
    {
        // execute it immediately if we have not been saved
        if (!isInstanceStateSaved()) {
            task.exec(this);
            return true;
        }

        // save it for better times
        retainFragment.tasks.add(task);
        return false;
    }

    /** Fragment used to retain activity data among re-instantiations */
    public static class ActivityRetainFragment extends Fragment {

        /**
         * Returns the single instance of this fragment, creating it if necessary
         * @param activity The Activity performing the request
         * @param name The name to be given to the Fragment
         * @return The Fragment
         */
        public static ActivityRetainFragment get(XAppCompatActivity activity, String name) {

            // find the retained fragment on activity restarts
            FragmentManager fm = activity.getSupportFragmentManager();
            ActivityRetainFragment fragment = (ActivityRetainFragment) fm.findFragmentByTag(name);

            // create the fragment and data the first time
            if (fragment == null) {
                // add the fragment
                fragment = new ActivityRetainFragment();
                fm.beginTransaction().add(fragment, name).commit();
            }

            return fragment;
        }

        /** The queued tasks */
        private LinkedList<ActivityTask> tasks = new LinkedList<>();

        @Override
        public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState)
        {
            super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

            // retain this fragment
            setRetainInstance(true);
        }

    }

    /** A task which needs to be performed by the activity when it is "fully operational" */
    public interface ActivityTask {

        /**
         * Executed this task on the specified activity
         * @param activity The activity
         */
        void exec(XAppCompatActivity activity);
    }
}

Then using a class like this:

/** AppCompatDialogFragment implementing additional compatibility checks */
public abstract class XAppCompatDialogFragment extends AppCompatDialogFragment {

    /**
     * Shows this dialog as soon as possible
     * @param activity The activity to which this dialog belongs to
     * @param tag The dialog fragment tag
     * @return true if the dialog has been shown immediately, false if the activity state has been saved
     *         and it is not possible to show it immediately
     */
    public boolean showRequest(XAppCompatActivity activity, final String tag) {
        return showRequest(activity, tag, null);
    }

    /**
     * Shows this dialog as soon as possible
     * @param activity The activity to which this dialog belongs to
     * @param tag The dialog fragment tag
     * @param args The dialog arguments
     * @return true if the dialog has been shown immediately, false if the activity state has been saved
     *         and it is not possible to show it immediately
     */
    public boolean showRequest(XAppCompatActivity activity, final String tag, final Bundle args)
    {
        return activity.post(new XAppCompatActivity.ActivityTask() {
            @Override
            public void exec(XAppCompatActivity activity) {
                if (args!= null) setArguments(args);
                show(activity.getSupportFragmentManager(), tag);
            }
        });
    }

    /**
     * Dismiss this dialog as soon as possible
     * @return true if the dialog has been dismissed immediately, false if the activity state has been saved
     *         and it is not possible to dismissed it immediately
     */
    public boolean dismissRequest()
    {
        return dismissRequest(null);
    }

    /**
     * Dismiss this dialog as soon as possible
     * @param runnable Actions to be performed before dialog dismissal
     * @return true if the dialog has been dismissed immediately, false if the activity state has been saved
     *         and it is not possible to dismissed it immediately
     */
    public boolean dismissRequest(final Runnable runnable)
    {
        // workaround as in rare cases the activity could be null
        XAppCompatActivity activity = (XAppCompatActivity)getActivity();
        if (activity == null) return false;

        // post the dialog dismissal
        return activity.post(new XAppCompatActivity.ActivityTask() {
            @Override
            public void exec(XAppCompatActivity activity) {
                if (runnable != null) runnable.run();
                dismiss();
            }
        });
    }
}

You can safely show dialogs without worrying about the app state:

public class TestDialog extends XAppCompatDialogFragment {

    private final static String TEST_DIALOG = "TEST_DIALOG";

    public static void show(XAppCompatActivity activity) {
        new TestDialog().showRequest(activity, TEST_DIALOG);
    }

    public TestDialog() {}

    @NonNull
    @Override
    public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState)
    {
        return new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity(), R.style.DialogFragmentTheme /* or null as you prefer */)
                .setTitle(R.string.title)
                // set all the other parameters you need, e.g. Message, Icon, etc.
                ).create();
    }
}

and then call TestDialog.show(this) from within your XAppCompatActivity.

If you want to create a more generic dialog class with parameters, you can save them in a Bundle with the arguments in the show() method and retrieve them with getArguments() in onCreateDialog().

The whole approach could seem a bit complex, but once you have created the two base classes for activities and dialogs, it is quite easy to use and is perfectly working. It can be used for other Fragment based operations which could be affected by the same problem.

0

This error appears to be occurring because input events (such as key down or onclick events) are getting delivered after onSaveInstanceState is called.

The solution is to override onSaveInstanceState in your Activity and cancel any pending events.

@Override
protected void onSaveInstanceState(Bundle outState) {
    super.onSaveInstanceState(outState);
    if (Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= Build.VERSION_CODES.KITKAT) {
        final View rootView = findViewById(android.R.id.content);
        if (rootView != null) {
            rootView.cancelPendingInputEvents();
        }
    }
}
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