17

I am using ASP.NET Web API. And I do like the ability to add attributes to specify levels of access to the API controllers like this:

[Authorize]
public IEnumerable<Activity> Get()

So far so good, but when I use roles the concept breaks apart.

[Authorize(Roles = "Manager")]
public IEnumerable<Activity> Get()

My user may have logged on to the system a while back, and then at some point they hit a resource that is "forbidden" to them. There is no sense in the user attempting to log on again. Since their rightful account does not have access to that URL. But currently they get a 401 (unauthorized) instead of a 403 (forbidden) as if they had logged on with the wrong account. But the user only has one account, and it is not intended that users ask for an account that belongs to someone else.

Has anyone else dealt with this problem? Does anyone know how to fix this? I am more than willing to write the code to fix this, but I am currently at a loss on where to start.

34

Reading Parv's suggestion, I created the following custom filter called [WebApiAuthorize].

The key is the HandleUnauthorizedRequest() method. When code is executing inside this method, it is because the user is unauthorized "for some reason".... so now we just determine out "why".... and then either:

  1. Call base method for default behavior (return 401).... or....
  2. Return our own response with a 403.

As you can see, it returns 403 when appropriate (authenticated, but not authorized).

public class WebApiAuthorizeAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    protected override void HandleUnauthorizedRequest(HttpActionContext ctx)
    {
        if (!ctx.RequestContext.Principal.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
            base.HandleUnauthorizedRequest(ctx);
        else
        {
            // Authenticated, but not AUTHORIZED.  Return 403 instead!
            ctx.Response = new HttpResponseMessage(System.Net.HttpStatusCode.Forbidden);
        }
    }
}

To use, just throw the custom filter on a controller or action like this.....

[WebApiAuthorize(Roles = "YourRoleA,YourRoleB")]
public class AdminController : ApiController
{
    public List<Admin> GetAdmins()
    {
        ...
    }
} 
1
  • 1
    small improvement. You should check if Principal or Identity is null otherwise you could get a NullReferenceException when no credentials are provided by request.protected bool IsAuthenticated(HttpActionContext ctx) { var principal = ctx.RequestContext.Principal; return principal != null && principal.Identity != null && principal.Identity.IsAuthenticated; } – Jehof May 19 '17 at 10:39
2

I did a bit of research and I coded a solution for me. I found two different Authorize attributes one on System.Web.Mvc and a second one in System.Web.Http. The first one applies to a regular MVC4 app and the second one to the WebAPI portion of MVC4 used for web services including RESTful interfaces. So I used the second one.

I decided to look at the Authorize Attribute Source code at codeplex. And I found this:

    protected virtual bool IsAuthorized(HttpActionContext actionContext)
    {
        if (actionContext == null)
        {
            throw Error.ArgumentNull("actionContext");
        }

        IPrincipal user = Thread.CurrentPrincipal;
        if (user == null || !user.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
        {
            return false;
        }

        if (_usersSplit.Length > 0 && !_usersSplit.Contains(user.Identity.Name, StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
        {
            return false;
        }

        if (_rolesSplit.Length > 0 && !_rolesSplit.Any(user.IsInRole))
        {
            return false;
        }

        return true;
    }

It is easy to see how authentication and access are conflated by the fact that they both have the same effect of returning false.

Here is a new AuthorizeAttribute I wrote that returns 403 when the user or roles don't match. That way you avoid getting a native log on window. It includes the following code.

        if (!IsAuthorized(actionContext))
        {
            HandleUnauthorizedRequest(actionContext);
        }

        if (!IsAllowed(actionContext))
        {
            HandleForbiddenRequest(actionContext);
        }
1
  • Upvoted reluctantly; you should quote the code for HandleUnathorizedRequest() and/or HandleForbiddenRequest() here so we don't have to follow the link to your gist. – Marc L. May 12 at 19:33
0

what you can do is make a custom Authorize attribute and then handle the AuthorizeCore and OnAuthorizationFailed in the latter one you can send whatever response you preffer

have a look here

4
  • Modifying the AuthorizeAttribue was the answer. That particular example is modifying System.Web.Mvc instead of System.Web.Http since I am using the WebAPI. – Arturo Hernandez Apr 2 '13 at 15:25
  • I thought you wanna make a custom attribute to send back Http Status codes you like – Parv Sharma Apr 2 '13 at 16:29
  • And that is what I did, I inherited from System.Web.Http.AuthorizeAtribute. Not from System.Web.Mvc.AuthorizeAtribute which is what the article you pointed refers to. – Arturo Hernandez Apr 3 '13 at 19:21
  • alternatively you can inherit from AutorizeFilterAttribute if you want to handle the custom code that are being sent after the request fails authorization – Parv Sharma Apr 4 '13 at 7:02

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