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I've been a little curious about this. Math.random() gives a value in the range [0.0,1.0). So what might the largest value it can give be? In other words, what is the closest double value to 1.0 that is less than 1.0?

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Java uses 64-bit IEEE-754 representation, so the closest number smaller than one is theoretically 3FEFFFFFFFFFFFFF in hexadecimal representation, which is 0 for sign, -1 for the exponent, and 1.9999999999999997 for the 52-bit significand. This equals to roughly 0.9999999999999998.

References: IEEE-754 Calculator.

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  • 1
    What about 0.9999999999999999? it has the same number of digits, but has a 9 instead of an 8 on the end. When I System.out.println(0.9999999999999999 - 0.9999999999999998), I get: 1.1102230246251565E-16
    – Justin
    Apr 1 '13 at 2:44
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    @gangqinlaohu The last digit is not precise. I truncated the number that I got from the IEEE-754 calculator (see the link in the answer) to get the number. The next digit after 8 is also 8, so if you apply rounding, the result becomes 0.9999999999999999. Apr 1 '13 at 2:49
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    Oh, so 0.9999999999999999 is closer than 0.9999999999999998, because 0.9999999999999998 is truncated, so the Double closest to 1 is 0.9999999999999999.
    – Justin
    Apr 1 '13 at 2:54
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The number that you want is returned by Math.nextAfter(1.0, -1.0).

The name of the function is somewhat of a misnomer. Math.nextAfter(a, 1.0) returns the least double value that is greater than a (i.e., the next value after a), and Math.nextAfter(a, -1.0) returns the greatest value that is less than a (i.e., the value before a).

Note: Another poster said, 1.0-Double.MIN_NORMAL. That's wrong. 1.0-Double.MIN_NORMAL is exactly equal to 1.0.

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  • 1
    Even better: Math.nextDown(1.0) - it's clearer, and possibly faster.
    – Martijn
    May 15 '18 at 11:28
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The smallest positive value of a double is Double.MIN_NORMAL. So, the largest number less than 1.0 is 1.0-Double.MIN_NORMAL.

Double.MIN_NORMAL is equal to 2-1022, so the answer is still extremely close to 1.0. You'd have to print the value of 1.0-Double.MIN_NORMAL to 308 decimal places before you could see anything but a 9.

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    Odd, when I encase 1.0 - Double.MIN_NORMAL == 1.0 in a System.out.println, I get true. But when I encase 0.9999999999999999 in the System.out.println, I get false. So does that mean that 0.9999999999999999 is the closest double to one?
    – Justin
    Apr 1 '13 at 2:41
  • Hum... Not, so, MIN_NORMAL applies to the value closest to zero It is of sorts the smallest error possible on IEEE-754 values. But since you moved towards 1, some of the precision gets lost!
    – mjv
    Apr 1 '13 at 2:43
  • System.out.println(Double.MinNormal) gives 2.2250738585072014E-308. Pretty small.
    – Justin
    Apr 1 '13 at 2:46
  • Interesting. @dasblinkenlight is correct above and I'm wrong. Intuitively, this answer is wrong because you're "spending" your precision too low to be captured in the difference between 1.0 and Double.MIN_NORMAL, and so the difference is "lost." Just goes to show how confusing floating-point arithmetic is. Leaving the answer and this (non-technical) explanation for posterity.
    – sigpwned
    Apr 1 '13 at 2:51
  • Seems to me that 0.9999999999999999 is the closest number. (found it via trial and error). When I take 0.99999999999999991 - 0.9999999999999999, I get 0.0. I'm guessing that's where the digits afterwards are left off.
    – Justin
    Apr 1 '13 at 2:51

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