8

Does anyone have a snippet of code that doesn't use windows.h to check for a key press within a while loop. Basically this code but without having to use windows.h to do it. I want to use it on Linux and Windows.

#include <windows.h>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    bool exit = false;

    while(exit == false)
    {
        if (GetAsyncKeyState(VK_ESCAPE))
        {
            exit = true;
        }
        std::cout<<"press esc to exit! "<<std::endl;
    }

    std::cout<<"exited: "<<std::endl;

    return 0;
}
  • s/GetAsyncKeyState(VK_ESCAPE)/GetAsyncKeyState(VK_ESCAPE) & 0x8000. – chris Apr 1 '13 at 4:11
  • @chris I'm sorry I don't understand what you mean. – pandoragami Apr 1 '13 at 4:11
  • Do you want a specific key to be pressed or any key? – Aswin Murugesh Apr 1 '13 at 4:12
  • @Aswin Any key is fine. – pandoragami Apr 1 '13 at 4:12
  • It means you should replace the first with the second. It's specified that if the key is down, the MSB is on. Standard C++ doesn't have a portable solution for this that I know of. I suppose a multithreaded cin.get() kind of works, but I'm very iffy with doing that. – chris Apr 1 '13 at 4:13
2

Your best bet is to create a custom "GetAsyncKeyState" function that will use #IFDEF for windows and linux to choose the appropriate GetAsyncKeyState() or equivalent.

No other way exists to achieve the desired result, the cin approach has its problems - such as the application must be in focus.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thats what I thought too. I don't like using #ifdef _WIN32 #endif #ifdef linux #endif but theres no other way I guess. – pandoragami Apr 1 '13 at 4:24
  • 1
    Another solution would be to have the implementation of such a function in two files, implement_linux.cpp and implement_windows.cpp for example, and simply compile and link with one of them depending on the system you're using. No #ifdef needed ! – Nbr44 Apr 1 '13 at 4:26
4
#include <conio.h>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    char c;
    std::cout<<"press esc to exit! "<<std::endl;
    while(true)
    {
        c=getch();
        if (c==27)
          break;
    }

    std::cout<<"exited: "<<std::endl;

    return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • So getch() just returns EOF with no input? Isn't getchar() more portable? – Baldrickk Sep 22 '14 at 13:23
2
char c;
while (cin >> c) {
...
}

ctrl-D terminates the above loop. It will continue so long as a char is entered.

| improve this answer | |
  • I'm on windows XP right now. Tried it and it just hangs. I guess its normal. – pandoragami Apr 1 '13 at 4:17
  • @lost_with_coding, Yes, all input in standard C++ is blocking. I'm not particularly confident in hacks to change that behaviour. – chris Apr 1 '13 at 4:17
  • @chris So there is no way to do this on windows without windows.h? – pandoragami Apr 1 '13 at 4:18
  • @lost_with_coding sorry for the misleading, windows does not have an equivalent key to ctrl-d. – gongzhitaao Apr 1 '13 at 4:19
  • I guess I could do #ifdef _WIN32 #endif #ifdef linux #endif – pandoragami Apr 1 '13 at 4:23
0

//simplest.

    #include <iostream>
    #include <conio.h>

using namespace std;
    int main()
    {

        char ch;
        bool loop=false;

      while(loop==false)
       {
        cout<<"press escape to end loop"<<endl;
        ch=getch();
        if(ch==27)
        loop=true;
       }
        cout<<"loop terminated"<<endl;
        return 0;
    }
| improve this answer | |
-1
//its not the best but it works


#include <vector>
#define WINVER 0x0500
#include <windows.h>
#include <conio.h>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
char c;
std::cout<<"press esc to exit! "<<std::endl;
while(true)
{

std::cout<<"executing code! , if code stops press any key to     continue or esc to stop"<<std::endl;


 INPUT ip;

// Set up a generic keyboard event.aa
ip.type = INPUT_KEYBOARD;
ip.ki.wScan = 0; // hardware scan code for key
ip.ki.time = 0;
ip.ki.dwExtraInfo = 0;

int lol =   65; //a key
    // Press the "A" key
ip.ki.wVk = lol; // virtual-key code for the "a" key
ip.ki.dwFlags = 0; // 0 for key press
SendInput(1, &ip, sizeof(INPUT));

// Release the "A" key
ip.ki.dwFlags = KEYEVENTF_KEYUP; // KEYEVENTF_KEYUP for key release
SendInput(1, &ip, sizeof(INPUT));

    c=getch();
    if (c==27)
      break;
  }

std::cout<<"exited: "<<std::endl;
return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Please do not post the same answer to multiple questions. If the same information really answers both questions, then one question (usually the newer one) should be closed as a duplicate of the other. You can indicate this by voting to close it as a duplicate or, if you don't have enough reputation for that, raise a flag to indicate that it's a duplicate. Otherwise, be sure you tailor your answer to this question and don't just paste the same answer in multiple places. – elixenide Jun 17 '16 at 19:07

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.