63

I would just like to ask if this is a correct way of checking if number is prime or not? because I read that 0 and 1 are NOT a prime number.

int num1;

Console.WriteLine("Accept number:");
num1 = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
if (num1 == 0 || num1 == 1)
{
    Console.WriteLine(num1 + " is not prime number");
    Console.ReadLine();
}
else
{
    for (int a = 2; a <= num1 / 2; a++)
    {
        if (num1 % a == 0)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(num1 + " is not prime number");
            return;
        }

    }
    Console.WriteLine(num1 + " is a prime number");
    Console.ReadLine();
}
7
  • 1
    Yes, a prime number is defined to be greater than one. Apr 1, 2013 at 12:10
  • 3
    would just like to ask if this is a correct way of checking - yes. Maybe you wanted to ask if it is a efficient way of checking? Apr 1, 2013 at 12:10
  • 3
    Nope. Trivially, you can start a at 3 and increment it by 2 instead of 1 (and handle 2 being prime as a special case). But see here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sieve_of_Eratosthenes Apr 1, 2013 at 12:17
  • 2
    @MatthewWatson A sieve is good if one wants to generate all the primes up to some limit, but to check whether one number is prime, it's useless. Apr 1, 2013 at 19:48
  • 2
    @Servy What do you mean with "If it's sufficiently small it's not even going to be inefficient"? If you sieve up to sqrt(n) to get the primes you need for trial division, the sieving is more work than the unnecessary divisions by composites, if you avoid multiples of 2, 3, and maybe 5, if you're enterprisy. If you're sieving to n to look up whether n is prime in the sieve, you have an asymptotically worse algorithm (and the constant factors don't let it win for small numbers either). Apr 1, 2013 at 20:34

31 Answers 31

117
var number;

Console.WriteLine("Accept number:");
number = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());

if (IsPrime(number))
{
    Console.WriteLine("It is prime");
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine("It is not prime");
}       

public static bool IsPrime(int number)
{
    if (number <= 1) return false;
    if (number == 2) return true;
    if (number % 2 == 0) return false;

    var boundary = (int)Math.Floor(Math.Sqrt(number));
          
    for (int i = 3; i <= boundary; i += 2)
        if (number % i == 0)
            return false;
    
    return true;        
}

I changed number / 2 to Math.Sqrt(number) because from in wikipedia, they said:

This routine consists of dividing n by each integer m that is greater than 1 and less than or equal to the square root of n. If the result of any of these divisions is an integer, then n is not a prime, otherwise it is a prime. Indeed, if n = a*b is composite (with a and b ≠

  1. then one of the factors a or b is necessarily at most square root of n
24
  • 9
    Good solution. Note though that you are recalculating the square root every time through the loop. Apr 1, 2013 at 14:49
  • 4
    Consider three cases. If the number is actually prime then it doesn't matter when you stop at the ceiling or the floor; either way you are going to deduce correctly that it is prime. Now suppose that it is composite and a perfect square. Then the ceiling and the floor are equal, so again, it doesn't matter which you choose because they are the same. Now suppose that it is composite and not a perfect square. Then it has a factor that is less than its square root, so the floor is correct. No matter which of these three cases we're in, you can take the floor. Apr 1, 2013 at 15:25
  • 2
    Note that this argument requires that my second claim is true: that for every perfect square, the ceiling and floor of the square root are equal. If Math.Sqrt ever says that the square root of 10000 is 99.9999999999999 instead of 100.0000000000000, my claim is wrong and you should use the ceiling. Are there any cases where my claim is wrong? Apr 1, 2013 at 15:27
  • 5
    So lets think about other ways that your algorithm is inefficient. Suppose you are checking a large prime. You check to see if it is divisible by 2 first. It isn't. Then you check 3. It isn't. Then you check 4. Why are you checking 4? If it is divisible by 4 then it must have already been divisible by 2. You then check 5. Then 6. Again, why check 6? It can only be divisible by 6 if it is divisible by 2 and 3, which you've already checked. Apr 1, 2013 at 15:35
  • 1
    @SonerGönül That depends. If you test one number, finding the primes to the square root is much more work than simply doing trial division omitting even numbers (except 2) and multiples of 3 (except 3 itself). If you test a lot of numbers, getting the primes for the trial divisions absolutely is worth it. Apr 1, 2013 at 20:00
19

Using Soner's routine, but with a slight variation: we will run until i equals Math.Ceiling(Math.Sqrt(number)) that is the trick for the naive solution:

boolean isPrime(int number)
{
    if (number == 1) return false;
    if (number == 2) return true;

    var limit = Math.Ceiling(Math.Sqrt(number)); //hoisting the loop limit

    for (int i = 2; i <= limit; ++i)  
       if (number % i == 0)  
           return false;
    return true;

}
2
  • Calculating square root each time in the loop? Isn't it inefficient?
    – Mangesh
    Feb 11, 2017 at 11:36
  • 2
    What @Mangesh meant is that the for loop recalculates the Sqrt each time around testing each possible divisor - apparently optimization won't hoist the constant expression out since it can't know what Math.Ceiling or Math.Sqrt compute (imagine if it was (new Random()).Next(number)) so you should be hoisting it out.
    – NetMage
    Mar 14, 2017 at 18:21
12

Here's a nice way of doing that.

    static bool IsPrime(int n)
    {
        if (n > 1)
        {
            return Enumerable.Range(1, n).Where(x => n%x == 0)
                             .SequenceEqual(new[] {1, n});
        }

        return false;
    }

And a quick way of writing your program will be:

        for (;;)
        {
            Console.Write("Accept number: ");
            int n = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
            if (IsPrime(n))
            {
                Console.WriteLine("{0} is a prime number",n);
            }
            else
            {
                Console.WriteLine("{0} is not a prime number",n);
            }
        }
6
  • 6
    3 years after, do you still write code like for(;;) ? Jul 22, 2016 at 8:39
  • 3
    After having given that criticism, I will say that I like the succinctness of your solution.
    – Matt Ruwe
    Dec 19, 2016 at 12:44
  • 3
    I disagree with @MattRuwe 's comment about "create a list of all numbers between ...". AFAIK, Range, Where, & SequenceEqual work by streaming the sequence without storing any element except the last read one. Feb 23, 2017 at 8:42
  • 1
    Interesting - I didn't know that about Range, Where and SequenceEqual.
    – Matt Ruwe
    Mar 2, 2017 at 13:36
  • 1
    @Dementic LOL no. May 20, 2020 at 20:28
7

I've implemented a different method to check for primes because:

  • Most of these solutions keep iterating through the same multiple unnecessarily (for example, they check 5, 10, and then 15, something that a single % by 5 will test for).
  • A % by 2 will handle all even numbers (all integers ending in 0, 2, 4, 6, or 8).
  • A % by 5 will handle all multiples of 5 (all integers ending in 5).
  • What's left is to test for even divisions by integers ending in 1, 3, 7, or 9. But the beauty is that we can increment by 10 at a time, instead of going up by 2, and I will demonstrate a solution that is threaded out.
  • The other algorithms are not threaded out, so they don't take advantage of your cores as much as I would have hoped.
  • I also needed support for really large primes, so I needed to use the BigInteger data-type instead of int, long, etc.

Here is my implementation:

public static BigInteger IntegerSquareRoot(BigInteger value)
{
    if (value > 0)
    {
        int bitLength = value.ToByteArray().Length * 8;
        BigInteger root = BigInteger.One << (bitLength / 2);
        while (!IsSquareRoot(value, root))
        {
            root += value / root;
            root /= 2;
        }
        return root;
    }
    else return 0;
}

private static Boolean IsSquareRoot(BigInteger n, BigInteger root)
{
    BigInteger lowerBound = root * root;
    BigInteger upperBound = (root + 1) * (root + 1);
    return (n >= lowerBound && n < upperBound);
}

static bool IsPrime(BigInteger value)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Checking if {0} is a prime number.", value);
    if (value < 3)
    {
        if (value == 2)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0} is a prime number.", value);
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0} is not a prime number because it is below 2.", value);
            return false;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        if (value % 2 == 0)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0} is not a prime number because it is divisible by 2.", value);
            return false;
        }
        else if (value == 5)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0} is a prime number.", value);
            return true;
        }
        else if (value % 5 == 0)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0} is not a prime number because it is divisible by 5.", value);
            return false;
        }
        else
        {
            // The only way this number is a prime number at this point is if it is divisible by numbers ending with 1, 3, 7, and 9.
            AutoResetEvent success = new AutoResetEvent(false);
            AutoResetEvent failure = new AutoResetEvent(false);
            AutoResetEvent onesSucceeded = new AutoResetEvent(false);
            AutoResetEvent threesSucceeded = new AutoResetEvent(false);
            AutoResetEvent sevensSucceeded = new AutoResetEvent(false);
            AutoResetEvent ninesSucceeded = new AutoResetEvent(false);
            BigInteger squareRootedValue = IntegerSquareRoot(value);
            Thread ones = new Thread(() =>
            {
                for (BigInteger i = 11; i <= squareRootedValue; i += 10)
                {
                    if (value % i == 0)
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("{0} is not a prime number because it is divisible by {1}.", value, i);
                        failure.Set();
                    }
                }
                onesSucceeded.Set();
            });
            ones.Start();
            Thread threes = new Thread(() =>
            {
                for (BigInteger i = 3; i <= squareRootedValue; i += 10)
                {
                    if (value % i == 0)
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("{0} is not a prime number because it is divisible by {1}.", value, i);
                        failure.Set();
                    }
                }
                threesSucceeded.Set();
            });
            threes.Start();
            Thread sevens = new Thread(() =>
            {
                for (BigInteger i = 7; i <= squareRootedValue; i += 10)
                {
                    if (value % i == 0)
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("{0} is not a prime number because it is divisible by {1}.", value, i);
                        failure.Set();
                    }
                }
                sevensSucceeded.Set();
            });
            sevens.Start();
            Thread nines = new Thread(() =>
            {
                for (BigInteger i = 9; i <= squareRootedValue; i += 10)
                {
                    if (value % i == 0)
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("{0} is not a prime number because it is divisible by {1}.", value, i);
                        failure.Set();
                    }
                }
                ninesSucceeded.Set();
            });
            nines.Start();
            Thread successWaiter = new Thread(() =>
            {
                AutoResetEvent.WaitAll(new WaitHandle[] { onesSucceeded, threesSucceeded, sevensSucceeded, ninesSucceeded });
                success.Set();
            });
            successWaiter.Start();
            int result = AutoResetEvent.WaitAny(new WaitHandle[] { success, failure });
            try
            {
                successWaiter.Abort();
            }
            catch { }
            try
            {
                ones.Abort();
            }
            catch { }
            try
            {
                threes.Abort();
            }
            catch { }
            try
            {
                sevens.Abort();
            }
            catch { }
            try
            {
                nines.Abort();
            }
            catch { }
            if (result == 1)
            {
                return false;
            }
            else
            {
                Console.WriteLine("{0} is a prime number.", value);
                return true;
            }
        }
    }
}

Update: If you want to implement a solution with trial division more rapidly, you might consider having a cache of prime numbers. A number is only prime if it is not divisible by other prime numbers that are up to the value of its square root. Other than that, you might consider using the probabilistic version of the Miller-Rabin primality test to check for a number's primality if you are dealing with large enough values (taken from Rosetta Code in case the site ever goes down):

// Miller-Rabin primality test as an extension method on the BigInteger type.
// Based on the Ruby implementation on this page.
public static class BigIntegerExtensions
{
  public static bool IsProbablePrime(this BigInteger source, int certainty)
  {
    if(source == 2 || source == 3)
      return true;
    if(source < 2 || source % 2 == 0)
      return false;

    BigInteger d = source - 1;
    int s = 0;

    while(d % 2 == 0)
    {
      d /= 2;
      s += 1;
    }

    // There is no built-in method for generating random BigInteger values.
    // Instead, random BigIntegers are constructed from randomly generated
    // byte arrays of the same length as the source.
    RandomNumberGenerator rng = RandomNumberGenerator.Create();
    byte[] bytes = new byte[source.ToByteArray().LongLength];
    BigInteger a;

    for(int i = 0; i < certainty; i++)
    {
      do
      {
        // This may raise an exception in Mono 2.10.8 and earlier.
        // http://bugzilla.xamarin.com/show_bug.cgi?id=2761
        rng.GetBytes(bytes);
        a = new BigInteger(bytes);
      }
      while(a < 2 || a >= source - 2);

      BigInteger x = BigInteger.ModPow(a, d, source);
      if(x == 1 || x == source - 1)
        continue;

      for(int r = 1; r < s; r++)
      {
        x = BigInteger.ModPow(x, 2, source);
        if(x == 1)
          return false;
        if(x == source - 1)
          break;
      }

      if(x != source - 1)
        return false;
    }

    return true;
  }
}
12
  • 1
    so you increment by 10 at a time, and only check 4 of the 10. But you can increment by 30, and only check 8 of the 30. Of course, 8/30 = 4/15 < 4/10. Then there's 48/210.
    – Will Ness
    Jun 26, 2014 at 14:32
  • 1
    starting with 7, increment by 30. which numbers from 7 to 36 do you really need? such that aren't multiples of 2,3 or 5. There are only 8 of them.
    – Will Ness
    Jun 26, 2014 at 14:36
  • 1
    you increment each of the eight numbers by 30, each time. see "Wheel factorization" (although WP article is badly written IMO). also: stackoverflow.com/a/21310956/849891 -- 2*3*5 = ....
    – Will Ness
    Jun 26, 2014 at 14:47
  • 1
    there is no limit but the returns are quickly diminishing for the rapidly growing investments: it's 1/2, 2/6, 8/30, 48/210, 480/2310, ... = 0.5, 0.3333, 0.2667, 0.2286, 0.2078, ... so the gains are 50%, 25%, 16.67%, 10%, ... for 2x, 4x, 6x, 10x, ... more numbers on the wheel to deal with. And if we do it with loop unrolling, it means 2x, ..., 10x, ... code blowup.
    – Will Ness
    Jun 26, 2014 at 22:03
  • 1
    ... so "return on investment" is 25%, 6.25%, 2.8%, 1%, ... so it doesn't pay much to enlarge the wheel past 11. Each wheel of circumference PRODUCT(p_i){i=1..n} contains PRODUCT(p_i - 1){i=1..n} spikes but gets us without composites only up to (p_(n+1))^2. Rolling the 100-primes wheel we only get primes up to 547^2=299209, but there are 4181833108490708127856970969853073811885209475016770818056714802062057564305290‌348961566798327912719763961768373051814396765475489229643362657214962862299679072‌90044555142202583817713509990400000000000000000000000000000 spikes on that wheel.
    – Will Ness
    Jun 27, 2014 at 21:11
7

This is basically an implementation of a brilliant suggestion made by Eric Lippert somewhere above.

    public static bool isPrime(int number)
    {
        if (number == 1) return false;
        if (number == 2 || number == 3 || number == 5) return true;
        if (number % 2 == 0 || number % 3 == 0 || number % 5 == 0) return false;

        var boundary = (int)Math.Floor(Math.Sqrt(number));

        // You can do less work by observing that at this point, all primes 
        // other than 2 and 3 leave a remainder of either 1 or 5 when divided by 6. 
        // The other possible remainders have been taken care of.
        int i = 6; // start from 6, since others below have been handled.
        while (i <= boundary)
        {
            if (number % (i + 1) == 0 || number % (i + 5) == 0)
                return false;

            i += 6;
        }

        return true;
    }
3
  • 1
    Why not change the loop to for (int i = 6; i <= boundary; i += 6)
    – Yetti99
    Dec 24, 2020 at 15:33
  • 1
    Might change the first line to if (number <= 1) return false;
    – Yetti99
    Dec 24, 2020 at 19:04
  • 1
    @Yetti99 You don't use the FOR loop, because inside, until that return false; it's incrementing 1 by 1, and not by 6. This is probably the best code in this page. Feb 21, 2022 at 16:26
5

Here's a good example. I'm dropping the code in here just in case the site goes down one day.

using System;

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
    //
    // Write prime numbers between 0 and 100.
    //
    Console.WriteLine("--- Primes between 0 and 100 ---");
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    {
        bool prime = PrimeTool.IsPrime(i);
        if (prime)
        {
        Console.Write("Prime: ");
        Console.WriteLine(i);
        }
    }
    //
    // Write prime numbers between 10000 and 10100
    //
    Console.WriteLine("--- Primes between 10000 and 10100 ---");
    for (int i = 10000; i < 10100; i++)
    {
        if (PrimeTool.IsPrime(i))
        {
        Console.Write("Prime: ");
        Console.WriteLine(i);
        }
    }
    }
}

Here is the class that contains the IsPrime method:

using System;

public static class PrimeTool
{
    public static bool IsPrime(int candidate)
    {
    // Test whether the parameter is a prime number.
    if ((candidate & 1) == 0)
    {
        if (candidate == 2)
        {
        return true;
        }
        else
        {
        return false;
        }
    }
    // Note:
    // ... This version was changed to test the square.
    // ... Original version tested against the square root.
    // ... Also we exclude 1 at the end.
    for (int i = 3; (i * i) <= candidate; i += 2)
    {
        if ((candidate % i) == 0)
        {
        return false;
        }
    }
    return candidate != 1;
    }
}
1
  • 4
    OP just wanted to check if a given number is prime or not, not calculate all primes between two numbers. Apr 9, 2016 at 7:19
3
/***
 * Check a number is prime or not
 * @param n the number
 * @return {@code true} if {@code n} is prime
 */
public static boolean isPrime(int n) {
    if (n == 2) {
        return true;
    }
    if (n < 2 || n % 2 == 0) {
        return false;
    }
    for (int i = 3; i <= Math.sqrt(n); i += 2) {
        if (n % i == 0) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}
2

This version calculates a list of primes square roots and only checks if the list of prime numbers below the square root, and uses a binarysearch in the list to find known primes. I looped through to check the first 1,000,000 primes, and it took about 7 seconds.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace ConsoleApplication5
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            //test();
            testMax();
            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        static void testMax()
        {
            List<int> CheckPrimes = Enumerable.Range(2, 1000000).ToList();
            PrimeChecker pc = new PrimeChecker(1000000);
            foreach (int i in CheckPrimes)
            {
                if (pc.isPrime(i))
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(i);
                }
            }
        }
    }

    public class PrimeChecker{
        public List<int> KnownRootPrimesList;
        public int HighestKnownPrime = 3;

        public PrimeChecker(int Max=1000000){
            KnownRootPrimesList = new List<int>();
            KnownRootPrimesList.Add(2);
            KnownRootPrimesList.Add(3);
            isPrime(Max);
        }

        public bool isPrime(int value)
        {
            int srt = Convert.ToInt32(Math.Ceiling(Math.Sqrt(Convert.ToDouble(value))));
            if(srt > HighestKnownPrime)
            {
                for(int i = HighestKnownPrime + 1; i <= srt; i++)
                {
                    if (i > HighestKnownPrime)
                    {
                        if(isPrimeCalculation(i))
                        {
                                KnownRootPrimesList.Add(i);
                                HighestKnownPrime = i;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            bool isValuePrime = isPrimeCalculation(value);
            return(isValuePrime);
        }

        private bool isPrimeCalculation(int value)
        {
            if (value < HighestKnownPrime)
            {
                if (KnownRootPrimesList.BinarySearch(value) > -1)
                {
                    return (true);
                }
                else
                {
                    return (false);
                }
            }
            int srt = Convert.ToInt32(Math.Ceiling(Math.Sqrt(Convert.ToDouble(value))));
            bool isPrime = true;
            List<int> CheckList = KnownRootPrimesList.ToList();
            if (HighestKnownPrime + 1 < srt)
            {
                CheckList.AddRange(Enumerable.Range(HighestKnownPrime + 1, srt));
            }
            foreach(int i in CheckList)
            {
                isPrime = ((value % i) != 0);
                if(!isPrime)
                {
                    break;
                }
            }
            return (isPrime);
        }

        public bool isPrimeStandard(int value)
        {
            int srt = Convert.ToInt32(Math.Ceiling(Math.Sqrt(Convert.ToDouble(value))));
            bool isPrime = true;
            List<int> CheckList = Enumerable.Range(2, srt).ToList();
            foreach (int i in CheckList)
            {
                isPrime = ((value % i) != 0);
                if (!isPrime)
                {
                    break;
                }
            }
            return (isPrime);
        }
    }
}
1

Based on @Micheal's answer, but checks for negative numbers and computes the square incrementally

    public static bool IsPrime( int candidate ) {
        if ( candidate % 2 <= 0 ) {
            return candidate == 2;
        }
        int power2 = 9;
        for ( int divisor = 3; power2 <= candidate; divisor += 2 ) {
            if ( candidate % divisor == 0 )
                return false;
            power2 += divisor * 4 + 4;
        }
        return true;
    }
1

Find this example in one book, and think it's quite elegant solution.

 static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.Write("Enter a number: ");
        int theNum = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());

        if (theNum < 3)  // special case check, less than 3
        {
            if (theNum == 2)
            {
                // The only positive number that is a prime
                Console.WriteLine("{0} is a prime!", theNum);
            }
            else
            {
                // All others, including 1 and all negative numbers, 
                // are not primes
                Console.WriteLine("{0} is not a prime", theNum);
            }
        }
        else
        {
            if (theNum % 2 == 0)
            {
                // Is the number even?  If yes it cannot be a prime
                Console.WriteLine("{0} is not a prime", theNum);
            }
            else
            {
                // If number is odd, it could be a prime
                int div;

                // This loop starts and 3 and does a modulo operation on all
                // numbers.  As soon as there is no remainder, the loop stops.
                // This can be true under only two circumstances:  The value of
                // div becomes equal to theNum, or theNum is divided evenly by 
                // another value.
                for (div = 3; theNum % div != 0; div += 2)
                    ;  // do nothing

                if (div == theNum)
                {
                    // if theNum and div are equal it must be a prime
                    Console.WriteLine("{0} is a prime!", theNum);
                }
                else
                {
                    // some other number divided evenly into theNum, and it is not
                    // itself, so it is not a prime
                    Console.WriteLine("{0} is not a prime", theNum);
                }
            }
        }

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
1

You can also find range of prime numbers till the given number by user.

CODE:

class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Input a number to find Prime numbers\n");
            int inp = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
            Console.WriteLine("\n Prime Numbers are:\n------------------------------");
            int count = 0;

            for (int i = 1; i <= inp; i++)
            {
                for (int j = 2; j < i; j++) // j=2 because if we divide any number with 1 the remaider will always 0, so skip this step to minimize time duration.
                {
                    if (i % j != 0)
                    {
                        count += 1;
                    }
                }
                if (count == (i - 2))
                    {
                        Console.Write(i + "\t"); 
                    }

                count = 0;
            }

            Console.ReadKey();

        }
    }

Prime numbers

0
1

I'm trying to get some efficiency out of early exit when using Any()...

    public static bool IsPrime(long n)
    {
        if (n == 1) return false;
        if (n == 3) return true;

        //Even numbers are not primes
        if (n % 2 == 0) return false;

        return !Enumerable.Range(2, Convert.ToInt32(Math.Ceiling(Math.Sqrt(n))))
            .Any(x => n % x == 0);
    }
1
  • I like the solution, but it doesn't unclude 2 as a prime number
    – Mark
    Jun 13, 2018 at 13:31
1

Original Answer

  • A prime number is odd except 2
  • A prime number is not negative
  • 1 or 0 is neither prime nor composite

Approach

  1. Add a counter to check how many times the input number is divisible by i (and has 0 (zero) remainder)
  2. If counter is = 2, then input is prime, else not prime
  3. If counter is > 2 "break" to avoid unnecessary processes (if you want to count the factors of your input number remove " || counter > 2 " on the first if statement)
  4. Add this line of code at the 2nd if statement inside the for loop if you want to see how many numbers with remainder 0 (or factors are present) :
Console.WriteLine( $" {inputNumber} / {i} = { inputNumber / i} (remainder: {inputNumber % i})" ); 
  1. Add the line of code in number 4 (at the end of the for loop) to see all the all the numbers divided by your input number (in case you want to see the remainder output and the quotient)
Console.Write( "Enter a Positive Number: " );
int inputNumber = Convert.ToInt32( Console.ReadLine() );
int counter = 0;

    for ( int i = 1; i <= inputNumber; i++ ) {
        if ( inputNumber == 0 || inputNumber == 1 || counter > 2 ) { break; }
        if ( inputNumber % i == 0 ) { counter++; }
    }

    if ( counter == 2 ) {
        Console.WriteLine( $"{inputNumber} is a prime number." );
    } else if ( inputNumber == 1 || inputNumber == 0 ) {
        Console.WriteLine( $"{inputNumber} is neither prime nor composite." );
    } else {
        Console.WriteLine( $"{inputNumber} is not a prime number. (It is a composite number)" );
    }

My reference: https://www.tutorialspoint.com/Chash-Program-to-check-if-a-number-is-prime-or-not



Simplified Version:

I used uint here instead of int to avoid negative inputs.

public bool IsPrime(uint number)
{
    if (number <= 1) { return false; }

    int counter = 0;
    for (int i = 1; i <= number; i++)
    {
        if (number % i == 0) { counter++; }
        if (counter > 2) { return false; }
    }

    return true;
}
1
  • I like your simplified version, it's a good naïve implementation albeit it wouldn't scale well with higher numbers. A (very, very small) optimisation is to return true for 2 & start the counter at 2 since we know that all numbers will be divisible by 1 so there's no point testing it. Therefore instead of having a counter you can simply return false as soon as number % i == 0. But it really is a super small optimisation: on my PC using LINQPad and Benchmark.Net it saved 0.222 seconds (less than 10% of total) when the input was 479001599 - the 9th factorial prime! I was just curious :) Jan 31, 2022 at 13:33
1

Update

Added else if (value % 2 == 0) to eliminate even numbers. thanks to avl_sweden

Method

Extension version:

public static bool IsPrime(this int value)
{
    if (value < 2)
        return false;
    else if (value == 2)
        return true;
    else if (value % 2 == 0) /*updated*/
        return false;

    var root = Math.Sqrt(value);

    for (int i = 3; i <= root; i += 2)
    {
        if (value % i == 0)
            return false;
    }
    return true;
}

Check

var primes = Enumerable.Range(1, 100).Where(x => x.IsPrime());
Console.WriteLine(string.Join(", ", primes));
/* Output
2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 53, 59, 61, 67, 71, 73, 79, 83, 89, 97
*/

Usage

12.IsPrime()    //false
13.IsPrime()    //true
151.IsPrime()   //true
2.IsPrime()     //true
2
  • 1
    This algorithm considers 4 to be prime, which is wrong.
    – avl_sweden
    Nov 26, 2021 at 11:51
  • 1
    You are absolutely right, I fixed it. thank you @avl_sweden Nov 26, 2021 at 18:18
1

Here's one with an explenation:

// Checks whether the provided number is a prime number.
  public static bool IsPrime(int num) {
    if (num <= 1)
      return false; // 1 or less is never prime.
    if (num==2)
      return true; // 2 is always a prime number.

    // Trial Division: Tries to divide number with all of the numbers in range 1-to-square-root(number).
    // If the number did not divide with the numbers in this range it will not divide with any other number therefore it's prime.
    int bound = (int)Math.Floor(Math.Sqrt(num));

    for (int i = 2; i<=bound; i ++) { 
      if (num % i == 0)
        return false;
    }

    return true;
  }
0

The algorithm in the function consists of testing whether n is a multiple of any integer between 2 and sqrt (n). If it's not, then True is returned which means the number (n) is a prime number, otherwise False is returned which means n divides a number that is between 2 and the floor integer part of sqrt(n).

private static bool isPrime(int n)
        {
            int k = 2;
            while (k * k <= n)
            {
                if ((n % k) == 0)
                    return false;
                else k++;
            }
            return true;
        }
1
  • While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. Please also try not to crowd your code with explanatory comments, this reduces the readability of both the code and the explanations!
    – kayess
    May 25, 2017 at 7:52
0

The algorithm in the function consists of testing whether n is a multiple of any integer between 2 and sqrt (n). If it's not, then True is returned which means the number (n) is a prime number, otherwise False is returned which means n divides a number that is between 2 and the floor integer part of sqrt(n).

Recursive version

        // Always call it as isPrime(n,2)
        private static bool isPrime(int n, int k)
        {
            if (k * k <= n)
            {
                if ((n % k) == 0)
                    return false;
                else return isPrime(n, k + 1);
            }
            else
                return true;
        }
2
  • Any large number is going to cause a StackOverflowExcpetion. Jan 3, 2018 at 5:23
  • Correct. Because of the recursion deep level. That's way I first posted the iterative approach. Recursion is elegance ;)
    – Igor Micev
    Jan 12, 2018 at 21:49
0

Prime numbers are numbers that are bigger than one and cannot be divided evenly by any other number except 1 and itself.

@This program will show you the given number is prime or not, and will show you for non prime number that it's divisible by (a number) which is rather than 1 or itself?@

        Console.Write("Please Enter a number: ");
        int number = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
        int count = 2; 
        // this is initial count number which is greater than 1

        bool prime = true;
        // used Boolean value to apply condition correctly

        int sqrtOfNumber = (int)Math.Sqrt(number); 
        // square root of input number this would help to simplify the looping.  

        while (prime && count <= sqrtOfNumber)
        {
            if ( number % count == 0)
            {
            Console.WriteLine($"{number} isn't prime and it divisible by 
                                      number {count}");  // this will generate a number isn't prime and it is divisible by a number which is rather than 1 or itself and this line will proves why it's not a prime number.
                prime = false;
            }
            
            count++;
            
        }
        if (prime && number > 1)
        
        {
            Console.WriteLine($"{number} is a prime number");
        }
        else if (prime == true)
        // if input is 1 or less than 1 then this code will generate
        {
            Console.WriteLine($"{number} isn't a prime");
        }
        
2
  • This is exactly the same principal solution as the most upvoted answer, except that it also checks all even numbers which is unnecessary. Not only was it not necessary to post yet another version of the most upvoted answer, posting a bad implementation of it is definitely not needed. Dec 2, 2017 at 13:32
  • nope it's most simplify answer that anyone could understand as beginner,, i used here several number's to check because i want to find why the number isn't prime and which is the divisible number of it. i think you got my point of view
    – Ti Kanon
    Dec 2, 2017 at 14:58
0

Here is a version without the "clutter" of other answers and simply does the trick.

static void Main(string[] args)
{

    Console.WriteLine("Enter your number: ");
    int num = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
    bool isPrime = true;
    for (int i = 2; i < num/2; i++)
    {
        if (num % i == 0)
        {
            isPrime = false;
            break;
        }
    }
    if (isPrime)
        Console.WriteLine("It is Prime");
    else
        Console.WriteLine("It is not Prime");
    Console.ReadLine();
}
0
function isPrime(n) {

    //the most speedly function

    var res = '';
    var is_composite = false;
    var err = false;
    var sqrt = Math.sqrt(n);

    if (n <= 1){
        err = true;
    }

    if (n == 2 || n == 3){

        res = true; //"Prime"

    } else if(n % 2 == 0 || n % 3 == 0) {

        res = false; //'Composite'

    } else{

        /*here you just neet to check dividers like (6k+1) or (6k-1)
          other dividers we exclude in if(n % 2 == 0 || n % 3 == 0)*/

        for(let i = 5; i <= sqrt; i += 6){
            if (n % i == 0){
                is_composite = true;
                break;
            }
        }

        if (!is_composite){
            for(let i=7; i <= sqrt; i += 6){
                if (n % i == 0){
                    is_composite = true;
                    break;
                }
            }
        }

        if (is_composite){
            res = false; //'Composite'
        } else {
            res = true; //'Prime'
        }
    }

    if (err) {
        res = 'error';
    }

    return res;
}
0

HackerRank Challenge (Running Time and Complexity): for multiple testcase, Prime Number.

Input Format: The first line contains an integer,T , the number of test cases. Each of the T subsequent lines contains an integer, n, to be tested for primality.

 int T = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
        int[] ar = new int[T];   

        for (int i = 0; i < ar.Length; ++i)
        {
            ar[i] = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
        }

        List<string> result = new List<string>();
        bool flag = true;
        for (int r = 0; r < ar.Length; ++r)
        {
            for (int i =2; i < (ar[r]>1000? ar[r]/4:ar[r]); ++i)
            {
                if (i != 1 && i != ar[r])
                {
                    if (ar[r] % i == 0)
                    {
                        flag = false;
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }

            if (flag && ar[r]!=1)
                result.Add("Prime");
            else
            {
                result.Add("Not prime");
                flag = true;
            }
              

        }

        foreach (var a in result)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(a);
        }
0

It might helpful.

boolean isPrime(int n)
{
 if(n==2) return true;
 if(n==1 || n%2==0) return false;

 int d,root;

 for(d=3,root=(int)Math.sqrt(n);d<=root && n%d!=0;d+=2);
 
 if(d>root) return true;
 return false;
}
0
public bool IsPrime(int num1)
  {
    if (n<2)
      return false;
    for (int a = 2; a <= Math.Sqrt(num1); a++)
    {
        if (num1 % a == 0)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(num1 + " is not prime number");
            return false;
        }

    }
    return true;
  }
-1
   bool flag = false;


            for (int n = 1;n < 101;n++)
            {
                if (n == 1 || n == 2)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("prime");
                }

                else
                {
                    for (int i = 2; i < n; i++)
                    {
                        if (n % i == 0)
                        {
                            flag = true;
                            break;
                        }
                    }
                }

                if (flag)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(n+" not prime");
                }
                else
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(n + " prime");
                }
                 flag = false;
            }

            Console.ReadLine();
1
  • This code runs and finds whether each number up to 100 is prime or not. That is not the objective of this question. Apr 9, 2016 at 7:28
-1

Only one row code:

    private static bool primeNumberTest(int i)
    {
        return i > 3 ? ( (Enumerable.Range(2, (i / 2) + 1).Where(x => (i % x == 0))).Count() > 0 ? false : true ) : i == 2 || i == 3 ? true : false;
    }
1
  • 1
    .Where(x => (i % x == 0))).Count() > 0 ? false : true is more concisely (and efficiently) expressed as .All(x => i%x != 0). Also, ? true : false is unnecessary. Finally, this isn't code golf. What's the advantage of packing all that logic into one line? Jan 22, 2015 at 22:45
-1

Try this code.

bool isPrimeNubmer(int n)
{
    if (n == 2 || n == 3) //2, 3 are prime numbers
        return true;
    else if (n % 2 == 0) //even numbers are not prime numbers
        return false;
    else
    {
        int j = 3;
        int k = (n + 1) / 2 ;

        while (j <= k)
        {
            if (n % j == 0)
                return false;
            j = j + 2;
        }
        return true;
    }
}
1
  • 2
    1 is not a prime number Jun 28, 2015 at 18:57
-1

I think this is a simple way for beginners:

using System;
using System.Numerics;
public class PrimeChecker
{
    public static void Main()
    {
    // Input
        Console.WriteLine("Enter number to check is it prime: ");
        BigInteger n = BigInteger.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
        bool prime = false;

    // Logic
        if ( n==0 || n==1)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(prime);
        }
        else if ( n==2 )
        {
            prime = true;
            Console.WriteLine(prime);
        }
        else if (n>2)
        {
            IsPrime(n, prime);
        }
    }

    // Method
    public static void IsPrime(BigInteger n, bool prime)
    {
        bool local = false;
        for (int i=2; i<=(BigInteger)Math.Sqrt((double)n); i++)
        {
            if (n % i == 0)
            {
                local = true;
                break;
            }
        }
        if (local)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(prime);
            }
        else
        {
            prime = true;
            Console.WriteLine(prime);
        }
    }
}
1
  • 3
    It would be nice to also add a brief explanation of what the code does and what is the core idea behind it - that would make the answer more useful end easy to read for beginners. And welcome to StackOverflow!
    – plamut
    Dec 9, 2015 at 18:43
-1

This is the simplest way to find prime number is

for(i=2; i<num; i++)
        {
            if(num%i == 0)
            {
                count++;
                break;
            }
        }
        if(count == 0)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("This is a Prime Number");
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("This is not a Prime Number");
        }

Helpful Link: https://codescracker.com/java/program/java-program-check-prime.htm

1
  • Doesn't check negative, and because you are not taking sqrt of the number and iterating you end up doing way more loops than necessary. tested with 300003 as the number and it looked 79 times. With sqrt first looks only 2-3 times. and fails on a list of primes from 2 to 100. Jul 22, 2022 at 23:48
-1

Shortest & fastest way to find the Prime Number using conventional technique.

public bool IsPrimeNumber(int Number)
{
    if (Number <= 1) 
        return false;

    if (Number == 2) 
        return true;

    if (Number % 2 == 0) 
        return false;

    int i = 2, j = Number / 2;

    for (; i <= j && Number % 2 != 0; i++);

    return (i - 1) == j;
}
1
  • 1
    This answer returns true for a Number of 9 (9 is not prime).
    – jlmt
    Jun 17, 2022 at 16:37
-1

I think this is the easiest way to do it.

static bool IsPrime(int number)
{
   if (number <= 0) return false;
   for (int i = 2; i <= number/2; i++)
       if (number % i == 0)
           return false;
    return true;
}
1
  • Edited, only add a negative number check. Jul 24, 2022 at 13:29

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