36

I know I'm missing something, because this has to be something easy to achieve.

My problem is that I have in my "loading screen" (the one that appears right after the splash) an UIImageView with two different images for 3.5" and 4" size screen. In a certain place of that images, I put one UIActivityIndicator, to tell the user that the app is loading something in the background. That place is not the same for both images, because one of them is obviously higher that the other, so I want to set an autolayout constraint that allows me to put that activity indicator at different heights, depends on if the app is running in an iPhone 5 or not.

Without Autolayout, I'd set the frame.origin.y of the view to 300 (for example), and then in the viewDidLoad method of the ViewController, I'd ask if the app is running in an iPhone 5, so I'd change the value to, for example, 350. I have no idea how to do this using Autolayout and I think it has to be pretty simple.

3
  • Can you pls clarify a bit more (or paste code) and also tell what is missing?
    – nzs
    Apr 1, 2013 at 13:45
  • I'm using no code to achieve this, but I'm doing it with Interface Builder. I'm going to edit the question to add an example.
    – Daniel
    Apr 1, 2013 at 14:12
  • Solution by using only the storyboard : stackoverflow.com/a/37411321/2477632 Jul 21, 2016 at 13:31

5 Answers 5

109

You can create an NSLayoutConstraint outlet on your view controller and connect the outlet to the activity indicator's Y constraint in your xib or storyboard. Then, add an updateViewContraints method to your view controller and update the constraint's constant according to the screen size.

connecting constraint to outlet

Here's an example of updateViewConstraints:

- (void)updateViewConstraints {
    [super updateViewConstraints];
    self.activityIndicatorYConstraint.constant =
        [UIScreen mainScreen].bounds.size.height > 480.0f ? 200 : 100;
}

Of course you will want to put in your appropriate values instead of 200 and 100. You might want to define some named constants. Also, don't forget to call [super updateViewConstraints].

12
  • 4
    If you haven't watched the auto layout videos from WWDC 2012, you should try to find the time to do so. This is covered, along with lots of other helpful tips. (Search for “auto layout” on that page, not “autolayout”.)
    – rob mayoff
    Apr 2, 2013 at 8:38
  • 2
    What tool did you use for your awesome GIF?
    – Klaas
    Sep 15, 2013 at 19:03
  • 11
    I used ScreenFlow to record the screen and to edit and crop the recording. I used Photoshop to turn the movie into a GIF.
    – rob mayoff
    Sep 15, 2013 at 19:18
  • 1
    @robmayoff - Great explanation indeed, perhaps you have idea how to achieve same result without updating constraints in runtime? It would be great if Interface Builder could show me updated layout when I'm switching between 3.5 and 4 inches form factor. Without that I'm forced to prepare UI for one screen size and use hacks in runtime to adjust view's position to actual screen size.
    – Darrarski
    Sep 29, 2013 at 22:10
  • 1
    The f suffix makes it a float constant instead of a double constant. This lets the compiler generate a float comparison instead of a double comparison, which should be faster on 32-bit iOS devices.
    – rob mayoff
    Dec 23, 2013 at 15:19
17

The problem of @Rob answer's is you should do a lot of code for each constraint. So to resolve that, just add ConstraintLayout class to your code and modify constraint constant value for the device that you want in the IB :

enter image description here

//
//  LayoutConstraint.swift
//  MyConstraintLayout
//
//  Created by Hamza Ghazouani on 19/05/2016.
//  Copyright © 2016 Hamza Ghazouani. All rights reserved.
//

import UIKit

@IBDesignable
class LayoutConstraint: NSLayoutConstraint {

    @IBInspectable
    var 📱3¨5_insh: CGFloat = 0 {
        didSet {
            if UIScreen.main.bounds.maxY == 480 {
                constant = 📱3¨5_insh
            }
        }
    }

    @IBInspectable
    var 📱4¨0_insh: CGFloat = 0 {
        didSet {
            if UIScreen.main.bounds.maxY == 568 {
                constant = 📱4¨0_insh
            }
        }
    }

    @IBInspectable
    var 📱4¨7_insh: CGFloat = 0 {
        didSet {
            if UIScreen.main.bounds.maxY == 667 {
                constant = 📱4¨7_insh
            }
        }
    }

    @IBInspectable
    var 📱5¨5_insh: CGFloat = 0 {
        didSet {
            if UIScreen.main.bounds.maxY == 736 {
                constant = 📱5¨5_insh
            }
        }
    }
}

Don't forgot to inherit your class constraint from ConstraintLayout I will add the objective-c version soon

6
  • This is something new to me. Can you point out to more info about extending NSLayoutConstraint and how to use them with interface builder? Nov 16, 2016 at 11:41
  • 1
    Could you please check this answer, if it's not clear for you I can upload a sample project with demo :) stackoverflow.com/questions/37411320/… Nov 16, 2016 at 11:45
  • I understand! You subclass it and change the constraint class in IB. That was my missing thing! Nov 16, 2016 at 12:03
  • Thanks @remy to update the code to swift 3. For swift 2 you can use the code in the screenshot :) Dec 27, 2016 at 11:37
  • Thanks @HamzaGhazouani, This solved my problem i am struggling for 4 hr to find a way to do this without lots of code. Sep 22, 2017 at 11:57
1

The basic tool in Auto Layout to manage UI objects' position is the Constraints. A constraint describes a geometric relationship between two views. For example, you might have a constraint that says: “The right edge of progress bar is connected to the left edge of a lable 40 points of empty space between them.”

This means using AutoLayout you can't do conditional position setting based on UIDevice's mode, rather you can create a view layout which modifies itself if eg. the app runs on 3.5' full screen (IPhone4) or 4' full screen (IPhone5) based on the constraints.

So options for your problem using Constraints:

1) find a view on your layout which can be used to create a constraint to position the progressbar relatively. (select the view and the progressbar using CMD button, then use Editor/Pin/Vertical Spacing menu item to create a vertical constraint between the 2 objects)

2) create an absolute constraint to stick the progressbar's position to screen edge (keeping space) or centrally

I found helpful this tutorial about AutoLayout which might be beneficial for you also: http://www.raywenderlich.com/20881/beginning-auto-layout-part-1-of-2

Pls note: autolayout only works from IOS 6.

2
  • If you allow coding and not just using Interface Builder (as you said) you can consider using the Constraints as @Rob mentioned and of course simply adjust the progressbar's frame in viewDidLoad based on [[UIScreen mainScreen ] bounds ].size.height parameter (480->IPhone4 or below, 568->IPhone5)
    – nzs
    Apr 1, 2013 at 22:29
  • I do allow coding, what I meant was that until that time I'd only used IB to set the constraints, I didn't know the updateViewConstraints method. Thanks, anyway.
    – Daniel
    Apr 2, 2013 at 8:32
1

The new way, Without writing a single line!

No need to write device based conditions like these :-

if device == iPhoneSE { 
   constant = 44 
} else if device == iPhone6 {
   constant = 52
}

I created a library Layout Helper so now you can update constraint for each device without writing a single line of code.

enter image description here

Step 1

Assign the NSLayoutHelper to your constraint

enter image description here

Step 2

Update the constraint for the device you want

enter image description here

Step 3

Run the app and see the MAGIC

enter image description here

0

I generally always try to stay in Interface Builder for setting up constraints. Diving in code to have more control is usually useful if you have completely different layouts on iPhone 4 and 6 for example.

As mentioned before, you can't have conditionals in Interface Builder, that's when linking a constraint to your view controller really comes handy.

Here's a short explanation on 3 approaches to solve Auto Layout issues for different screen sizes: http://candycode.io/how-to-set-up-different-auto-layout-constraints-for-different-screen-sizes/

2
  • We can change the value in IB :) May 19, 2016 at 14:19
  • @HamzaGhazouani yes you can. But you can't have conditionals there (if width < 320pt, etc.)
    – Jure
    May 22, 2016 at 16:00

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