210

There is nice Array method reduce() to get one value from the Array. Example:

[0,1,2,3,4].reduce(function(previousValue, currentValue, index, array){
  return previousValue + currentValue;
});

What is the best way to achieve the same with objects? I'd like to do this:

{ 
    a: {value:1}, 
    b: {value:2}, 
    c: {value:3} 
}.reduce(function(previous, current, index, array){
  return previous.value + current.value;
});

However, Object does not seem to have any reduce() method implemented.

4
  • 1
    Are you using Underscore.js? – Sethen Apr 1 '13 at 17:57
  • Nope. Does Underscore provide reduce for objects? – Pavel S. Apr 1 '13 at 17:57
  • I can't remember. I know it has a reduce method. I would check there. Though, the solution doesn't seem that difficult. – Sethen Apr 1 '13 at 17:58
  • 2
    @Sethen Maleno, @Pavel: yes _ does have a reduce for objects. Not sure if it works by accident or if object support was intentional, but indeed you can pass an object as in this question's example, and it will (conceptually) for..in, calling your iterator function with the values found at each key. – Roatin Marth Apr 1 '13 at 18:10

14 Answers 14

96

What you actually want in this case are the Object.values. Here is a concise ES6 implementation with that in mind:

const add = {
  a: {value:1},
  b: {value:2},
  c: {value:3}
}

const total = Object.values(add).reduce((t, {value}) => t + value, 0)

console.log(total) // 6

or simply:

const add = {
  a: 1,
  b: 2,
  c: 3
}

const total = Object.values(add).reduce((t, n) => t + n)

console.log(total) // 6
1
  • That's Array.prototype.values() that you linked to - edited now – Jonathan Wood Sep 19 '17 at 14:11
296

One option would be to reduce the keys():

var o = { 
    a: {value:1}, 
    b: {value:2}, 
    c: {value:3} 
};

Object.keys(o).reduce(function (previous, key) {
    return previous + o[key].value;
}, 0);

With this, you'll want to specify an initial value or the 1st round will be 'a' + 2.

If you want the result as an Object ({ value: ... }), you'll have to initialize and return the object each time:

Object.keys(o).reduce(function (previous, key) {
    previous.value += o[key].value;
    return previous;
}, { value: 0 });
5
  • 16
    Nice answer but it is more readable to use Object.values instead of Object.keys because we are concerned about the values here not the keys. It should be like this: Object.values(o).reduce((total, current) => total + current.value, 0); – Mina Luke Apr 9 '17 at 1:48
  • 4
    Object.values has much worse browser support than Object.keys, but that might not be an issue if you use a polyfill or you transpile with Babel – duhaime Nov 29 '17 at 12:38
  • exactly, i was using this in keys that has beet retrieved from mongo model, and i passed an empty object as an initial value to the result of reduce of keys, and as much as i was using @babel/plugin-proposal-object-rest-spread plugin , i was spread the accumulator value in return of reduce and it works like a charm, but i was wondere if im doing something wrong, be cause i was passing the obejct to the initial value of reduce and your answer proved me that i did the right thing! – a_m_dev Mar 26 '20 at 13:39
  • But using Object.values doesn't give you access to the actual key being used. Using the key , particularly in reduction, is very common – Sean Munson Dec 21 '20 at 11:54
  • also - outside of examples - who has a list of object properties that they want to simply sum up ? Most of the time object properties are distinct. – Sean Munson Dec 21 '20 at 11:55
64

ES6 implementation: Object.entries()

const o = {
  a: {value: 1},
  b: {value: 2},
  c: {value: 3}
};

const total = Object.entries(o).reduce(function (total, pair) {
  const [key, value] = pair;
  return total + value;
}, 0);
7
  • 4
    Object.entries(o); // returns [['value',1],['value',2],['value',3]] – faboulaws Feb 27 '17 at 15:39
  • 2
    const [key, value] = pair; I have never seen this! – Martin Meeser Feb 28 '18 at 20:09
  • 11
    @martin-meeser - this is called destructuring. We can even omit this line by changing function (total, pair) to function (total, [key, value]) – Jakub Zawiślak Mar 7 '18 at 12:05
  • 1
    @faboulaws Object.entries(o); // returns [["a", { value: 1 }], ["b", { value: 2 }], ["c", { value: 3 }]] – Thomas Aug 15 '19 at 7:52
  • 1
    @faboulaws your answer is wrong, the last line should be return total + value.value. becase Object.entries(o) [ [ "a", { "value": 1 } ], [ "b", { "value": 2 } ], [ "c", { "value": 3 } ] ] , it is very misleading. even 3 people thumbs up... – huantao Sep 16 '20 at 3:45
20

First of all, you don't quite get what's reduce's previous value is.

In you pseudo code you have return previous.value + current.value, therefore the previous value will be a number on the next call, not an object.

Second, reduce is an Array method, not an Object's one, and you can't rely on the order when you're iterating the properties of an object (see: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Statements/for...in, this is applied to Object.keys too); so I'm not sure if applying reduce over an object makes sense.

However, if the order is not important, you can have:

Object.keys(obj).reduce(function(sum, key) {
    return sum + obj[key].value;
}, 0);

Or you can just map the object's value:

Object.keys(obj).map(function(key) { return this[key].value }, obj).reduce(function (previous, current) {
    return previous + current;
});

P.S. in ES6 with the fat arrow function's syntax (already in Firefox Nightly), you could shrink a bit:

Object.keys(obj).map(key => obj[key].value).reduce((previous, current) => previous + current);
4

An object can be turned into an array with: Object.entries(), Object.keys(), Object.values(), and then be reduced as array. But you can also reduce an object without creating the intermediate array.

I've created a little helper library odict for working with objects.

npm install --save odict

It has reduce function that works very much like Array.prototype.reduce():

export const reduce = (dict, reducer, accumulator) => {
  for (const key in dict)
    accumulator = reducer(accumulator, dict[key], key, dict);
  return accumulator;
};

You could also assign it to:

Object.reduce = reduce;

as this method is very useful!

So the answer to your question would be:

const result = Object.reduce(
  {
    a: {value:1},
    b: {value:2},
    c: {value:3},
  },
  (accumulator, current) => (accumulator.value += current.value, accumulator), // reducer function must return accumulator
  {value: 0} // initial accumulator value
);
3

1:

[{value:5}, {value:10}].reduce((previousValue, currentValue) => { return {value: previousValue.value + currentValue.value}})

>> Object {value: 15}

2:

[{value:5}, {value:10}].map(item => item.value).reduce((previousValue, currentValue) => {return previousValue + currentValue })

>> 15

3:

[{value:5}, {value:10}].reduce(function (previousValue, currentValue) {
      return {value: previousValue.value + currentValue.value};
})

>> Object {value: 15}
2

Extend Object.prototype.

Object.prototype.reduce = function( reduceCallback, initialValue ) {
    var obj = this, keys = Object.keys( obj );

    return keys.reduce( function( prevVal, item, idx, arr ) {
        return reduceCallback( prevVal, item, obj[item], obj );
    }, initialValue );
};

Sample of using.

var dataset = {
    key1 : 'value1',
    key2 : 'value2',
    key3 : 'value3'
};

function reduceFn( prevVal, key, val, obj ) {
    return prevVal + key + ' : ' + val + '; ';
}

console.log( dataset.reduce( reduceFn, 'initialValue' ) );
'Output' == 'initialValue; key1 : value1; key2 : value2; key3 : value3; '.

n'Joy it, guys!! ;-)

4
  • -1, now you have a new enumerable property on all future objects: jsfiddle.net/ygonjooh – Johan Oct 21 '14 at 7:59
  • 2
  • 1
    Please don't modify the base prototype like this. This can lead to a lot of problems for future developers working in the same code base – adam.k Apr 12 '20 at 10:20
  • Yes, it is a "monkey patching" This solution was written 6 years ago and not too relevant now, just keep in mind And for example, it will be better to use Object.entries() in 2021 – user1247458 Apr 13 '20 at 11:36
2

You can use a generator expression (supported in all browsers for years now, and in Node) to get the key-value pairs in a list you can reduce on:

>>> a = {"b": 3}
Object { b=3}

>>> [[i, a[i]] for (i in a) if (a.hasOwnProperty(i))]
[["b", 3]]
1

If you can use an array, do use an array, the length and order of an array are half its worth.

function reducer(obj, fun, temp){
    if(typeof fun=== 'function'){
        if(temp== undefined) temp= '';
        for(var p in obj){
            if(obj.hasOwnProperty(p)){
                temp= fun(obj[p], temp, p, obj);
            }
        }
    }
    return temp;
}
var O={a:{value:1},b:{value:2},c:{value:3}}

reducer(O, function(a, b){return a.value+b;},0);

/* returned value: (Number) 6 */

1

This is not very difficult to implement yourself:

function reduceObj(obj, callback, initial) {
    "use strict";
    var key, lastvalue, firstIteration = true;
    if (typeof callback !== 'function') {
        throw new TypeError(callback + 'is not a function');
    }   
    if (arguments.length > 2) {
        // initial value set
        firstIteration = false;
        lastvalue = initial;
    }
    for (key in obj) {
        if (!obj.hasOwnProperty(key)) continue;
        if (firstIteration)
            firstIteration = false;
            lastvalue = obj[key];
            continue;
        }
        lastvalue = callback(lastvalue, obj[key], key, obj);
    }
    if (firstIteration) {
        throw new TypeError('Reduce of empty object with no initial value');
    }
    return lastvalue;
}

In action:

var o = {a: {value:1}, b: {value:2}, c: {value:3}};
reduceObj(o, function(prev, curr) { prev.value += cur.value; return prev;}, {value:0});
reduceObj(o, function(prev, curr) { return {value: prev.value + curr.value};});
// both == { value: 6 };

reduceObj(o, function(prev, curr) { return prev + curr.value; }, 0);
// == 6

You can also add it to the Object prototype:

if (typeof Object.prototype.reduce !== 'function') {
    Object.prototype.reduce = function(callback, initial) {
        "use strict";
        var args = Array.prototype.slice(arguments);
        args.unshift(this);
        return reduceObj.apply(null, args);
    }
}
0

Since it hasnt really been confirmed in an answer yet, Underscore's reduce also works for this.

_.reduce({ 
    a: {value:1}, 
    b: {value:2}, 
    c: {value:3} 
}, function(prev, current){
    //prev is either first object or total value
    var total = prev.value || prev

    return total + current.value
})

Note, _.reduce will return the only value (object or otherwise) if the list object only has one item, without calling iterator function.

_.reduce({ 
    a: {value:1} 
}, function(prev, current){
    //not called
})

//returns {value: 1} instead of 1
0
0

Try out this one liner arrow function

Object.values(o).map(a => a.value, o).reduce((ac, key, index, arr) => ac+=key)
0

Try this one. It will sort numbers from other variables.

const obj = {
   a: 1,
   b: 2,
   c: 3
};
const result = Object.keys(obj)
.reduce((acc, rec) => typeof obj[rec] === "number" ? acc.concat([obj[rec]]) : acc, [])
.reduce((acc, rec) => acc + rec)
-1

If handled as an array is much easier

Return the total amount of fruits:

let fruits = [{ name: 'banana', id: 0, quantity: 9 }, { name: 'strawberry', id: 1, quantity: 1 }, { name: 'kiwi', id: 2, quantity: 2 }, { name: 'apple', id: 3, quantity: 4 }]

let total = fruits.reduce((sum, f) => sum + f.quantity, 0);

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