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My goal is to do something so that for instance,

pairs<1,2,3,4>()

Has return type

std::tuple<some_other_type<1,2>, some_other_type<2,3>, some_other_type<3,4>>

I am wondering if this is even possible with C++ template metaprogramming, and how it could be accomplished. For actually producing the value, it seems as though I can use tuple_cat to recursively concatenate to the output, but I'm finding it difficult to express the return type, since it is itself varadic and effectively a function of the number of template parameters. Complicating the situation, if I went the tuple_cat route it seems like I would also have to overload the function to take a tuple to concatenate onto, and the concatenation would happen at runtime, not compile-time. Am I on a wild goose chase here?

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+1 This is probably achievable using a class... –  Alex Chamberlain Apr 1 '13 at 20:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Here is a way of doing that. Given your class template some_other_type:

template<int I, int J>
struct some_other_type { };

And given some machinery hidden in the detail namespace:

namespace detail
{
    template<int... Is>
    struct pairs { };

    template<int I, int J>
    struct pairs<I, J> 
    { 
        using type = std::tuple<some_other_type<I, J>>; 
    };

    template<int I, int J, int... Is>
    struct pairs<I, J, Is...>
    {
        using type = decltype(std::tuple_cat(
                std::tuple<some_other_type<I, J>>(),
                typename pairs<J, Is...>::type()));
    };
}

You could provide a simple function that instantiates the helper class template:

template<int... Is>
typename detail::pairs<Is...>::type pairs()
{
    return typename detail::pairs<Is...>::type();
}

And here is how you would use it (and a test case):

#include <type_traits>

int main()
{
    auto p = pairs<1, 2, 3, 4>();

    // Won't fire!
    static_assert(
        std::is_same<
            decltype(p),
            std::tuple<
                some_other_type<1,2>,
                some_other_type<2,3>,
                some_other_type<3,4>>
            >::value,
            "Error!");
}

Finally, here is a live example.


IMPROVEMENT: (why writing <1, 2, 3, 4> when one could write <1, 5>)?

It is also possible to extend the above solution so that it won't be required to manually write every number between the minimum and the maximum as a template argument of pairs(). Given the additional machinery below, again hidden in a detail namespace:

namespace detail
{
    template <int... Is>
    struct index_list { };

    template <int MIN, int N, int... Is>
    struct range_builder;

    template <int MIN, int... Is>
    struct range_builder<MIN, MIN, Is...>
    {
        typedef index_list<Is...> type;
    };

    template <int MIN, int N, int... Is>
    struct range_builder : public range_builder<MIN, N - 1, N - 1, Is...>
    { };

    // Meta-function that returns a [MIN, MAX) index range
    template<int MIN, int MAX>
    using index_range = typename range_builder<MIN, MAX>::type;

    template<int... Is>
    auto pairs_range(index_list<Is...>) -> decltype(::pairs<Is...>())
    {
        return ::pairs<Is...>();
    }
}

It is possible to define a helper function pairs_range() which accepts 2 template arguments defining the range [begin, end) - where end is not included, in the style of the Standard Library:

template<int I, int J>
auto pairs_range() -> decltype(pairs_range(detail::index_range<I, J>()))
{
    return pairs_range(detail::index_range<I, J>());
}

And this is how one would use it (including a test case):

int main()
{
    // Won't fire!
    static_assert(
        std::is_same<
            decltype(pairs_range<1, 5>()),
            decltype(pairs<1, 2, 3, 4>())
            >::value,
            "Error!");
}

And once again, here is a live example.

share|improve this answer

Here is my version of it (live here), 100% compile-time, returning the new parameter list as a type (not a function return):

First, let's define our result structures:

template<int a, int b>
struct tpair
{
};

template<typename... p>
struct final_
{
};

The key point is to concat parameters packs. Here is the struct that will do the job:

template<typename a, typename b>
struct concat
{
};

template<typename a, typename... b>
struct concat<a, final<b...>>
{
   typedef final_<a,b...> type;
};

Now, the struct used to 'pairize' your list. Normally it will fail with odd numbers of values:

template<int a, int b, int... values>
struct pairize
{
   // Choose one of the following versions:
   // First version: only non-overlapping pairs : (1,2) (3,4) ...
   typedef typename concat<tpair<a,b>, typename pairize<values...>::type>::type type;
   // Second version: overlapping pairs : (1,2) (2,3) (3,4)...
   typedef typename concat<tpair<a,b>, typename pairize<b,values...>::type>::type type; 
};

template<int a, int b>
struct pairize<a,b>
{
   typedef final_<tpair<a,b>> type; 
};

In the live example there is also a code outputting the name of all types in a parameter pack to the console, with demangling, as a test (was funnier to use than the incomplete type trick).

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Note that you are missing every other pair (he also wants 2-3 and 4-5). –  Marc Glisse Apr 1 '13 at 21:31
    
You are right, I read the question too fast. Give me time to fix this ;) –  Synxis Apr 1 '13 at 21:32
    
I think it is a 2 character fix ;-) –  Marc Glisse Apr 1 '13 at 21:32
    
Yep, done. Thanks! –  Synxis Apr 1 '13 at 21:34

And now, let's try it with indices and without recursion (except, of course, for the indices):

#include <tuple>

template< std::size_t... Ns >
struct indices
{
    typedef indices< Ns..., sizeof...( Ns ) > next;
};

template< std::size_t N >
struct make_indices
{
    typedef typename make_indices< N - 1 >::type::next type;
};

template<>
struct make_indices< 0 >
{
    typedef indices<> type;
};

template< std::size_t, std::size_t >
struct sometype {};

template< typename, typename, typename >
struct make_pairs;

template< std::size_t... Ns, std::size_t... Ms, std::size_t... Is >
struct make_pairs< indices< Ns... >, indices< Ms... >, indices< Is... > >
{
  using type = decltype( std::tuple_cat(
    std::declval< typename std::conditional< Is % 2 == 1,
                                             std::tuple< sometype< Ns, Ms > >,
                                             std::tuple<> >::type >()...
  ));
};

template< std::size_t... Ns >
using pairs = typename make_pairs< indices< 0, Ns... >, indices< Ns..., 0 >,
                typename make_indices< sizeof...( Ns ) + 1 >::type >::type;

int main()
{
  static_assert( std::is_same< pairs<1,2,4,3,5,9>,
    std::tuple< sometype<1,2>, sometype<4,3>, sometype<5,9> > >::value, "Oops" );
}

(OK, I cheated a bit: std::tuple_cat might be recursive itself ;)


Update: OK, I should have read the question more carefully. Here's the version which produces the desired result (indices / make_indices as above):

template< std::size_t, std::size_t >
struct sometype {};

template< typename, typename, typename >
struct make_pairs;

template< std::size_t... Ns, std::size_t... Ms, std::size_t... Is >
struct make_pairs< indices< Ns... >, indices< Ms... >, indices< Is... > >
{
  using type = decltype( std::tuple_cat(
    std::declval< typename std::conditional< Is != 0 && Is != sizeof...( Is ) - 1,
                                             std::tuple< sometype< Ns, Ms > >,
                                             std::tuple<> >::type >()...
  ));
};

template< std::size_t... Ns >
using pairs = typename make_pairs< indices< 0, Ns... >, indices< Ns..., 0 >,
                typename make_indices< sizeof...( Ns ) + 1 >::type >::type;

int main()
{
  static_assert( std::is_same< pairs<1,2,3,4>,
    std::tuple< sometype<1,2>, sometype<2,3>, sometype<3,4> > >::value, "Oops" );
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. After twenty minutes of looking at this, I can almost manage to see how and why it works. But I would have never been able to figure it out myself. Very interesting technique, I need to learn this well. –  Andy Prowl Apr 1 '13 at 22:53
    
@AndyProwl It might look strange, but there are cases where it's vital to avoid recursion. It usually isn't important as long as you are just calculating types, but when the recursion involves code generation, the difference is huge! That is why I like this kind of questions and why I use them to train, even if it takes a bit longer than the simple recursive version. –  Daniel Frey Apr 1 '13 at 23:01
    
Indeed, that's very interesting. I should practice this more. I remembered this technique because you used it already in another answer, but it would never come to my mind it could be used here. And after thinking a bit about it, it seems it is usable pretty much everywhere. If you have some more examples of problems where this idiom brings a "natural" solution, feel free to bring them up, I'll be thankful ;) –  Andy Prowl Apr 1 '13 at 23:06
    
@AndyProwl Every case is different, but here is another example where it feels quite natural to me and where code generation is involved. –  Daniel Frey Apr 1 '13 at 23:10
    
Yes, that's a pretty natural situation, but I was mostly referring to the use of std::conditional and the argument pack expansion to define what would be a base case if recursion were used. Beautiful. –  Andy Prowl Apr 1 '13 at 23:15

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