466

I have the following JavaScript syntax:

var discount = Math.round(100 - (price / listprice) * 100);

This rounds up to the whole number. How can I return the result with two decimal places?

2
  • Because of sometimes .xxx5 into .xxx4999..., so I change 5 to 6. Is this wrong? Yes, if the decimal is lower than 2 (because want 2 decimal). function fround(n,r){var t=String(n).split(".");return t[1].length>r&&5==t[1][t[1].length-1]&&(t[1]=t[1].slice(0,-1)+"6"),Math.round(Number(t.join("."))*10**r)/10**r} – Transamunos Jul 12 '20 at 0:21
  • Found another way: function fround(n,r=2){return Math.round(Math.round(n*10**(r+1))/10)/10**r} – Transamunos Jul 12 '20 at 1:58

12 Answers 12

862

NOTE - See Edit 4 if 3 digit precision is important

var discount = (price / listprice).toFixed(2);

toFixed will round up or down for you depending on the values beyond 2 decimals.

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/calder12/tv9HY/

Documentation: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Number/toFixed

Edit - As mentioned by others this converts the result to a string. To avoid this:

var discount = +((price / listprice).toFixed(2));

Edit 2- As also mentioned in the comments this function fails in some precision, in the case of 1.005 for example it will return 1.00 instead of 1.01. If accuracy to this degree is important I've found this answer: https://stackoverflow.com/a/32605063/1726511 Which seems to work well with all the tests I've tried.

There is one minor modification required though, the function in the answer linked above returns whole numbers when it rounds to one, so for example 99.004 will return 99 instead of 99.00 which isn't ideal for displaying prices.

Edit 3 - Seems having the toFixed on the actual return was STILL screwing up some numbers, this final edit appears to work. Geez so many reworks!

var discount = roundTo((price / listprice), 2);

function roundTo(n, digits) {
  if (digits === undefined) {
    digits = 0;
  }

  var multiplicator = Math.pow(10, digits);
  n = parseFloat((n * multiplicator).toFixed(11));
  var test =(Math.round(n) / multiplicator);
  return +(test.toFixed(digits));
}

See Fiddle example here: https://jsfiddle.net/calder12/3Lbhfy5s/

Edit 4 - You guys are killing me. Edit 3 fails on negative numbers, without digging into why it's just easier to deal with turning a negative number positive before doing the rounding, then turning it back before returning the result.

function roundTo(n, digits) {
    var negative = false;
    if (digits === undefined) {
        digits = 0;
    }
    if (n < 0) {
        negative = true;
        n = n * -1;
    }
    var multiplicator = Math.pow(10, digits);
    n = parseFloat((n * multiplicator).toFixed(11));
    n = (Math.round(n) / multiplicator).toFixed(digits);
    if (negative) {
        n = (n * -1).toFixed(digits);
    }
    return n;
}

Fiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/3Lbhfy5s/79/

29
  • 39
    .toFixed returns a string not a number however - developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – Daniel Flippance May 5 '14 at 18:11
  • 4
    make sure the item you use toFixed on is a number, you can parseFloat it first. – DrCord May 22 '14 at 1:25
  • 79
    Seems like an awful lot of work to turn a number to a string, back to a number. I've found that Math.round(x * 100) / 100; is the easiest, simplest way to round to two decimal places. – Marquizzo Jun 5 '15 at 23:33
  • 9
    Downvote, because it's very inefficient (on my machine it takes 400x longer than Math.round) jsperf.com/round-numbers-to-2-digits – Simon Aug 6 '15 at 16:29
  • 4
    Seriously enough, the point of this was to answer the initial question, which this answer does. If you have a better answer by all means add it, but nitpicking a 6 year old answer to how to round to 2 decimal places because it doesn't round to 20 decimal places is exactly what is wrong with this site. – Rick Calder Jan 4 '19 at 13:39
146

If you use a unary plus to convert a string to a number as documented on MDN.

For example:+discount.toFixed(2)

8
  • 2
    clutch, im using this with +new Date() now too – neaumusic Aug 18 '14 at 1:50
  • 3
    @neaumusic you can just use Date.now() – Carl von Buelow Sep 18 '15 at 13:47
  • 1
    Nice catch with using the plus to convert string to number – RobPethi Jan 26 '17 at 16:30
  • 16
    Really, you should use parseFloat( discount.toFixed(2) ) instead of forcing type coersion as it is more obvious to other people (and you later) – Hugo Buff Mar 24 '17 at 14:59
  • 3
    Your answer does not work: parseFloat((1.005).toFixed(2)) should give 1.01, not 1.00 – user6269864 Nov 1 '18 at 3:43
52

The functions Math.round() and .toFixed() is meant to round to the nearest integer. You'll get incorrect results when dealing with decimals and using the "multiply and divide" method for Math.round() or parameter for .toFixed(). For example, if you try to round 1.005 using Math.round(1.005 * 100) / 100 then you'll get the result of 1, and 1.00 using .toFixed(2) instead of getting the correct answer of 1.01.

You can use following to solve this issue:

Number(Math.round(100 - (price / listprice) * 100 + 'e2') + 'e-2');

Add .toFixed(2) to get the two decimal places you wanted.

Number(Math.round(100 - (price / listprice) * 100 + 'e2') + 'e-2').toFixed(2);

You could make a function that will handle the rounding for you:

function round(value, decimals) {
    return Number(Math.round(value + 'e' + decimals) + 'e-' + decimals);
}

Example: https://jsfiddle.net/k5tpq3pd/36/

Alternativ

You can add a round function to Number using prototype. I would not suggest adding .toFixed() here as it would return a string instead of number.

Number.prototype.round = function(decimals) {
    return Number((Math.round(this + "e" + decimals)  + "e-" + decimals));
}

and use it like this:

var numberToRound = 100 - (price / listprice) * 100;
numberToRound.round(2);
numberToRound.round(2).toFixed(2); //Converts it to string with two decimals

Example https://jsfiddle.net/k5tpq3pd/35/

Source: http://www.jacklmoore.com/notes/rounding-in-javascript/

5
  • 7
    They might've voted down because it's not really an error. Math.round() is meant to round to the nearest whole integer, and people generally frown upon and try not to change built-in methods like this in case someone is expecting that functionality to be like it was when they go to code behind you. But your code is sound, and +1 for pointing out the limitations of Math.round(). – vapcguy Apr 1 '15 at 3:50
  • +1 for feedback! I've refraised the answer based on your feedback so hope more will find it more helpful and correct – Arne H. Bitubekk Apr 2 '15 at 7:37
  • How do you force 2 decimals? In your example, a number with 1 decimal doesn't fill in the second decimal slot with a "0", e.g. "1.3" rounds to "1.3" instead of "1.30". – zeeshan Sep 1 '16 at 4:00
  • To achive this you have to convert the number to string, the simplest way is to use .toFixed(2) (where 2 is the number of decimals you want). It's covered in the answer I gave :) – Arne H. Bitubekk Sep 1 '16 at 7:47
  • 1
    This approach doesn't work for numbers whose string representation already has an exponent. Anything 1e+21 or higher, for example, returns NaN. – qntm Oct 24 '16 at 19:58
36

To get the result with two decimals, you can do like this :

var discount = Math.round((100 - (price / listprice) * 100) * 100) / 100;

The value to be rounded is multiplied by 100 to keep the first two digits, then we divide by 100 to get the actual result.

4
  • 3
    @DejayClayton What's wrong with it? I even think this is upvote-worthy. – jgillich May 15 '14 at 15:16
  • 2
    @DejayClayton Actually that's the correct way to do this, without going through the kludge of converting to a string and back to a number. – thomasfuchs Feb 21 '15 at 13:18
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    Sorry, I don't know what I was actually complaining about, other than the fact that it looks like a jumble of undifferentiated magic numbers. But it's concise, I guess. – Dejay Clayton Apr 30 '15 at 22:37
  • If the number results in 1.005 for instance, this will round to 1 instead of 1.1. Discount below would equal 1 instead of 1.1 let price = 98.995 let listprice = 100 var discount = Math.round((100 - (price / listprice) * 100) * 100) / 100; – Bryce Sep 8 '17 at 13:26
28

The best and simple solution I found is

function round(value, decimals) {
 return Number(Math.round(value+'e'+decimals)+'e-'+decimals);
}   
round(1.005, 2); // 1.01
3
  • 2
    The first solution that works! – user6269864 Nov 1 '18 at 3:44
  • 2
    This solution does not work for values that JS already represents in scientific notation in string form. Try calling round(0.0000000001, 2) and you get the wrong answer. It's also completely silly to switch between numbers and strings twice for such a simple mathematical operation. – JounceCracklePop Mar 6 '19 at 19:56
  • 2
    This solution does not work for typescript too – Muhammed Moussa Aug 12 '20 at 12:26
22

try using discount.toFixed(2);

2
  • 1
    This is nice, but returns a string rather than a decimal. So if you do this and then +3 you end up with something like "11.113" (where the discount value was 11.109897 for example. So, if you do this, and need it to be a number for further calculations, either parseInt it, or multiply it by 1. – Luke Stevenson Jul 2 '20 at 3:51
  • 1
    You'd sometimes need to use parseFloat(), not parseInt(). parseInt() removes the digits after the decimal to round it to the nearest whole integer. parseFloat() keeps the digits, so that you may use this for currency or more precise calculations. – Akel Jul 28 '20 at 14:31
19

I think the best way I've seen it done is multiplying by 10 to the power of the number of digits, then doing a Math.round, then finally dividing by 10 to the power of digits. Here is a simple function I use in typescript:

function roundToXDigits(value: number, digits: number) {
    value = value * Math.pow(10, digits);
    value = Math.round(value);
    value = value / Math.pow(10, digits);
    return value;
}

Or plain javascript:

function roundToXDigits(value, digits) {
    if(!digits){
        digits = 2;
    }
    value = value * Math.pow(10, digits);
    value = Math.round(value);
    value = value / Math.pow(10, digits);
    return value;
}
3
  • 1
    upvote for the description of the functions before writing the code :) – vibs2006 Sep 7 '17 at 7:34
  • This fails the 1.005 test. roundToXDigits(1.005, 2) => 1 – brainbag Jan 22 '18 at 14:17
  • 1
    @brainbag yeah but only due to floating point math. 1.005 * Math.pow(10, 2) is 100.49999999999999 so rounds down. There's not much you can do about that without pulling in a BigNumbers lib or something. roundToXDigits(1.05, 1) returns correctly, as does roundToXDigits(1.0005, 3), etc. – Molomby Aug 20 '19 at 4:13
10

A small variation on the accepted answer. toFixed(2) returns a string, and you will always get two decimal places. These might be zeros. If you would like to suppress final zero(s), simply do this:

var discount = + ((price / listprice).toFixed(2));

Edited: I've just discovered what seems to be a bug in Firefox 35.0.1, which means that the above may give NaN with some values.
I've changed my code to

var discount = Math.round(price / listprice * 100) / 100;

This gives a number with up to two decimal places. If you wanted three, you would multiply and divide by 1000, and so on.
The OP wants two decimal places always, but if toFixed() is broken in Firefox it needs fixing first.
See https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1134388

3
  • You can also parseFloat the result: var discount = parseFloat((price / listprice).toFixed(2)); – Emilie Feb 13 '15 at 19:41
  • the second solution can result in rounding 1.005 to 1 instead of 1.1 (as mentioned by Laurynas Lazauskas below). I've updated my answer which does convert from numbers to strings but should round in this edge case to 1.1 – Bryce Sep 8 '17 at 13:27
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    Shouldn't it round to 1.01? – Deejers Feb 27 '18 at 15:23
7

Fastest Way - faster than toFixed():

TWO DECIMALS

x      = .123456
result = Math.round(x * 100) / 100  // result .12

THREE DECIMALS

x      = .123456
result = Math.round(x * 1000) / 1000      // result .123
2
  • 6
    Fast but wrong: Math.round(1.005 * 100) / 100 returns 1 – Christophe Roussy Oct 12 '17 at 8:05
  • I had to use Math.round(num * 100)/100 approach because of below scenario 3.555 --> 3.56, // while using toFixed(2) although i wanted 3.555 --> 3.55 // worked when i used Math.round approach – Nikhil Kamani May 7 '20 at 5:06
3
    function round(num,dec)
    {
      num = Math.round(num+'e'+dec)
      return Number(num+'e-'+dec)
    }
      //Round to a decimal of your choosing:
    round(1.3453,2)
1
  • I like this solution. Short and simple but one issue which can be solved by just adding 'toFixed(dec)' in the end. Number(Math.round(num + 'e2') + 'e-2').toFixed(2) – Harry Nov 20 '17 at 12:44
0

To handle rounding to any number of decimal places, a function with 2 lines of code will suffice for most needs. Here's some sample code to play with.



    var testNum = 134.9567654;
    var decPl = 2;
    var testRes = roundDec(testNum,decPl);  
    alert (testNum + ' rounded to ' + decPl + ' decimal places is ' + testRes);

    function roundDec(nbr,dec_places){
        var mult = Math.pow(10,dec_places);
        return Math.round(nbr * mult) / mult;
    }

-1

Here is a working example

var value=200.2365455;
result=Math.round(value*100)/100    //result will be 200.24
1
  • This does not always return a correct answer: Math.round(1.005 * 100) / 100 == 1 according to this solution. – Laurynas Lazauskas Mar 2 '17 at 8:51

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