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Let's say we have a String like these ones :

"abcdaaaaefghaaaaaaaaa"
"012003400000000"

I would like to remove the last repetitive characters, to obtain this :

"abcdaaaaefgh"
"0120034"

Is there a simple way to do this, with regex ? I am kind of having hard times with this and my code begin to look like a gigantic monster...

Some clarification :

  • What is considered as repetitive ?

    A sequence of at least 2 characters at the end. One character is not considered as repeated. For instance : in "aaaa", 'a' is not considered as repetitive, but in "baaaa", it is. So in the case of "aaaa", we don't have to change anything to the String. Another instance : "baa" must give "b".

  • And for Strings of only one character ?

    A string like "a"in which we only have the char 'a' must be returned without changing anything, i.e. we must return "a".

share|improve this question
    
Only one character is repeated? –  Sam Apr 2 '13 at 13:24
    
Is the last character always repeated? –  Loamhoof Apr 2 '13 at 13:24
    
No, the last character is not always repeated. It can have a sequence of at least 2 characters at the end. One character is not considered as repeated. –  Nestor Pigrounet Apr 2 '13 at 13:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would not use a regex:

public class Test {
  public void test() {
    System.out.println(removeTrailingDupes("abcdaaaaefghaaaaaaaaa"));
    System.out.println(removeTrailingDupes("012003400000000"));
    System.out.println(removeTrailingDupes("0120034000000001"));
    System.out.println(removeTrailingDupes("cc"));
    System.out.println(removeTrailingDupes("c"));
  }

  private String removeTrailingDupes(String s) {
    // Is there a dupe?
    int l = s.length();
    if (l > 1 && s.charAt(l - 1) == s.charAt(l - 2)) {
      // Where to cut.
      int cut = l - 2;
      // What to cut.
      char c = s.charAt(cut);
      while (cut > 0 && s.charAt(cut - 1) == c) {
        // Cut that one too.
        cut -= 1;
      }
      // Cut off the repeats.
      return s.substring(0, cut);
    }
    // Return it untouched.
    return s;
  }

  public static void main(String args[]) {
    new Test().test();
  }
}

To match @JonSkeet's "spec":

Note that this will only remove characters that are duplicated at the end. That means single character strings will not be touched but two-character strings could become empty if both characters are the same:

"" => ""
"x" => "x"
"xx" => ""
"aaaa" => ""
"ax" => "ax"
"abcd" => "abcd"
"abcdddd" => "abc"

I wonder if it would be possible to achieve that level of control in a regex?

Added as a result of the ... but If we use this regex with aaaa for example, it returns nothing. It should return aaaa. comment:

Instead, use:

  private String removeTrailingDupes(String s) {
    // Is there a dupe?
    int l = s.length();
    if (l > 1 && s.charAt(l - 1) == s.charAt(l - 2)) {
      // Where to cut.
      int cut = l - 2;
      // What to cut.
      char c = s.charAt(cut);
      while (cut > 0 && s.charAt(cut - 1) == c) {
        // Cut that one too.
        cut -= 1;
      }
      // Cut off the repeats.
      return cut > 0 ? s.substring(0, cut): s;
    }
    // Return it untouched.
    return s;
  }

which has the contract:

"" => ""
"x" => "x"
"xx" => "xx"
"aaaa" => "aaaa"
"ax" => "ax"
"abcd" => "abcd"
"abcdddd" => "abc"
share|improve this answer
    
I accept your answer ! Your edit does exactly what I want, and does not look like my horrible monster code, thank you ! –  Nestor Pigrounet Apr 2 '13 at 13:59

You can use replaceAll() together with a back reference:

str = str.replaceAll("(.)\\1+$", "");

EDIT

To meet the requirement that the entire string can't get removed I would simply add a check afterwards instead of making the regex overly complicated:

public String replaceLastRepeated(String str) {
    String replaced = str.replaceAll("(.)\\1+$", "");
    if (replaced.equals("")) {
        return str;
    }
    return replaced;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
damn it! I was writing the same thing :) –  Eugene Apr 2 '13 at 13:25
2  
@Eugene not only you, anyway +1 for the fastest gun. –  Pshemo Apr 2 '13 at 13:29
    
If we use this regex with aaaa for example, it returns nothing. It should return aaaa –  Nestor Pigrounet Apr 2 '13 at 13:45
    
@Pigrou: In that case you need to refine your specifications. In what cases should the last characters not be removed? –  Keppil Apr 2 '13 at 13:51
    
I edited my question to be clearer :) –  Nestor Pigrounet Apr 2 '13 at 13:53

I don't think I'd use a regex for this:

public static String removeRepeatedLastCharacter(String text) {
    if (text.length() == 0) {
        return text;
    }
    char lastCharacter = text.charAt(text.length() - 1);
    // Look backwards through the string until you find anything which isn't
    // the final character
    for (int i = text.length() - 2; i >= 0; i--) {
        if (text.charAt(i) != lastCharacter) {
            // Add one to *include* index i
            return text.substring(0, i + 1);
        }
    }
    // Looks like we had a string such as "1111111111111".
    return "";
}

Personally I find that easier to understand than a regex. It may or may not be faster - I wouldn't like to make a prediction.

Note that this will always remove the final character, whether it's repeated or not. That means single character strings will always end up as empty strings:

"" => ""
"x" => ""
"xx" => ""
"ax" => "a"
"abcd" => "abc"
"abcdddd" => "abc"
share|improve this answer
1  
Not sure if you've correctly handled the one-character case and the two-character case correctly. Test with "c" and with "0120034000000001" to confirm. –  OldCurmudgeon Apr 2 '13 at 13:33
    
@OldCurmudgeon: A single character will end up returning an empty string, always. Two characters should be okay - it'll enter the for loop once (i == 0) and will return text.substring(0, 1) if the two characters are different. –  Jon Skeet Apr 2 '13 at 13:34
    
Sorry - I edited my comment. We seem to disagree on interpretation. No problem –  OldCurmudgeon Apr 2 '13 at 13:37
    
@OldCurmudgeon: Yup, both behaved as I expected them to. Definitely a matter of the OP not being precise. I'll explain the behaviour in my answer. –  Jon Skeet Apr 2 '13 at 13:42
    
I like the fact that is does not use regex, but If we use this regex with aaaa for example, it returns nothing. It should return aaaa. –  Nestor Pigrounet Apr 2 '13 at 13:47

Replace (.)\1+$ by an empty string:

"abcddddd".replaceFirst("(.)\\1+$", ""); // returns abc
share|improve this answer

This should do the trick :

public class Remover {
     public static String removeTrailing(String toProcess)
     {
        char lastOne = toProcess.charAt(toProcess.length() - 1);
        return toProcess.replaceAll(lastOne + "+$", "");
     } 

     public static void main(String[] args)
     {
        String test1 = "abcdaaaaefghaaaaaaaaa";
        String test2 = "012003400000000";

        System.out.println("Test1 without trail : " + removeTrailing(test1));
        System.out.println("Test2 without trail : " + removeTrailing(test2));
     }
}
share|improve this answer

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