12

I have a Compare() function that looks like this:

inline bool Compare(bool greater, int p1, int p2) {
  if (greater) return p1>=p2;
  else return p1<=p2;
}

I decided to optimize to avoid branching:

inline bool Compare2(bool greater, int p1, int p2) {
  bool ret[2] = {p1<=p2,p1>=p2};
  return ret[greater];
}

I then tested by doing this:

bool x = true;
int M = 100000;
int N = 100;

bool a[N];
int b[N];
int c[N];

for (int i=0;i<N; ++i) {
  a[i] = rand()%2;
  b[i] = rand()%128;
  c[i] = rand()%128;
}

// Timed the below loop with both Compare() and Compare2()
for (int j=0; j<M; ++j) {
  for (int i=0; i<N; ++i) {
    x ^= Compare(a[i],b[i],c[i]);
  }
}

The results:

Compare(): 3.14ns avg
Compare2(): 1.61ns avg

I would say case-closed, avoid branching FTW. But for completeness, I replaced

a[i] = rand()%2;

with:

a[i] = true;

and got the exact same measurement of ~3.14ns. Presumably, there is no branching going on then, and the compiler is actually rewriting Compare() to avoid the if statement. But then, why is Compare2() faster?

Unfortunately, I am assembly-code-illiterate, otherwise I would have tried to answer this myself.

EDIT: Below is some assembly:

_Z7Comparebii:
.LFB4:
    .cfi_startproc
    .cfi_personality 0x3,__gxx_personality_v0
    pushq   %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
    .cfi_offset 6, -16
    .cfi_def_cfa_register 6
    movl    %edi, %eax
    movl    %esi, -8(%rbp)
    movl    %edx, -12(%rbp)
    movb    %al, -4(%rbp)
    cmpb    $0, -4(%rbp)
    je      .L2
    movl    -8(%rbp), %eax
    cmpl    -12(%rbp), %eax
    setge   %al
    jmp     .L3
.L2:
    movl    -8(%rbp), %eax
    cmpl    -12(%rbp), %eax
    setle   %al
.L3:
    leave
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
.LFE4:
    .size   _Z7Comparebii, .-_Z7Comparebii
    .section        .text._Z8Compare2bii,"axG",@progbits,_Z8Compare2bii,comdat
    .weak   _Z8Compare2bii
    .type   _Z8Compare2bii, @function
_Z8Compare2bii:
.LFB5:
    .cfi_startproc
    .cfi_personality 0x3,__gxx_personality_v0
    pushq   %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
    .cfi_offset 6, -16
    .cfi_def_cfa_register 6
    movl    %edi, %eax
    movl    %esi, -24(%rbp)
    movl    %edx, -28(%rbp)
    movb    %al, -20(%rbp)
    movw    $0, -16(%rbp)
    movl    -24(%rbp), %eax
    cmpl    -28(%rbp), %eax
    setle   %al
    movb    %al, -16(%rbp)
    movl    -24(%rbp), %eax
    cmpl    -28(%rbp), %eax
    setge   %al
    movb    %al, -15(%rbp)
    movzbl  -20(%rbp), %eax
    cltq
    movzbl  -16(%rbp,%rax), %eax
    leave
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
.LFE5:
    .size   _Z8Compare2bii, .-_Z8Compare2bii
    .text

Now, the actual code that performs the test might be using inlined versions of the above two functions, so there is a possibility this might be the wrong code to analyze. With that said, I see a jmp command in Compare(), so I think that means that it is branching. If so, I guess this question becomes: why does the branch predictor not improve the performance of Compare() when I change a[i] from rand()%2 to true (or false for that matter)?

EDIT2: I replaced "branch prediction" with "branching" to make my post more sensible.

  • 13
    optimize to avoid branch prediction Isn't this an oxymoron? – Lightness Races with Monica Apr 2 '13 at 17:07
  • 3
    You'll have to share the assembly code since what happens depends a lot on which compiler you're using and at what optimization level. – Raymond Chen Apr 2 '13 at 17:07
  • 2
    @ Last Line: then why don't you post the assembly? – user529758 Apr 2 '13 at 17:07
  • 4
    You didn't set the seed. Maybe the compiler is smart enough to know what rand() returns in this case? Just a quick thought. Also you should really compare the assembly. Even though you're assembly-code-illiterate, you can still show the difference. – Zeta Apr 2 '13 at 17:08
  • 4
    Might have been a conditional move.. show the assembly. – harold Apr 2 '13 at 17:10
4

I think I figured most of this out.

When I posted the assembly for the functions in my OP edit, I noted that the inlined version might be different. I hadn't examined or posted the timing code because it was hairier, and because I thought that the process of inlining would not change whether or not branching takes place in Compare().

When I un-inlined the function and repeated my measurements, I got the following results:

Compare(): 7.18ns avg
Compare2(): 3.15ns avg

Then, when I replaced a[i]=rand()%2 with a[i]=false, I got the following:

Compare(): 2.59ns avg
Compare2(): 3.16ns avg

This demonstrates the gain from branch prediction. The fact that the a[i] substitution yielded no improvement originally shows that inlining removed the branch.

So the last piece of the mystery is why the inlined Compare2() outperforms the inlined Compare(). I suppose I could post the assembly for the timing code. It seems plausible enough that some quirk in how functions get inlined might lead to this, so I'm content to end my investigation here. I will be replacing Compare() with Compare2() in my application.

Thanks for the many helpful comments.

EDIT: I should add that the probable reason that Compare2 beats all others is that the processor is able to perform both comparisons in parallel. This was the intuition which led me to write the function the way I did. All other variants essentially require two logically serial operations.

3

I wrote a C++ library called Celero designed to test just such optimizations and alternatives. (Shameless self promotion: https://github.com/DigitalInBlue/Celero)

I ran your cases using the following code:

class StackOverflowFixture : public celero::TestFixture
{
  public:
    StackOverflowFixture()
    {
    }

    inline bool NoOp(bool greater, int p1, int p2) 
    {
      return true;
    }

    inline bool Compare(bool greater, int p1, int p2) 
    {
      if(greater == true)
      {
        return p1>=p2;
      }

      return p1<=p2;
    }

    inline bool Compare2(bool greater, int p1, int p2)
    {
      bool ret[2] = {p1<=p2,p1>=p2};
      return ret[greater];
    }

    inline bool Compare3(bool greater, int p1, int p2) 
    {
      return (!greater != !(p1 <= p2)) | (p1 == p2);
    }

    inline bool Compare4(bool greater, int p1, int p2) 
    {
      return (greater ^ (p1 <= p2)) | (p1 == p2);
    }
};

BASELINE_F(StackOverflow, Baseline, StackOverflowFixture, 100, 5000000)
{
  celero::DoNotOptimizeAway(NoOp(rand()%2, rand(), rand()));
}

BENCHMARK_F(StackOverflow, Compare, StackOverflowFixture, 100, 5000000)
{
  celero::DoNotOptimizeAway(Compare(rand()%2, rand(), rand()));
}

BENCHMARK_F(StackOverflow, Compare2, StackOverflowFixture, 100, 5000000)
{
  celero::DoNotOptimizeAway(Compare2(rand()%2, rand(), rand()));
}

BENCHMARK_F(StackOverflow, Compare3, StackOverflowFixture, 100, 5000000)
{
  celero::DoNotOptimizeAway(Compare3(rand()%2, rand(), rand()));
}

BENCHMARK_F(StackOverflow, Compare4, StackOverflowFixture, 100, 5000000)
{
  celero::DoNotOptimizeAway(Compare4(rand()%2, rand(), rand()));
}

The results are shown below:

[==========]
[  CELERO  ]
[==========]
[ STAGE    ] Baselining
[==========]
[ RUN      ] StackOverflow.Baseline -- 100 samples, 5000000 calls per run.
[     DONE ] StackOverflow.Baseline  (0.690499 sec) [5000000 calls in 690499 usec] [0.138100 us/call] [7241140.103027 calls/sec]
[==========]
[ STAGE    ] Benchmarking
[==========]
[ RUN      ] StackOverflow.Compare -- 100 samples, 5000000 calls per run.
[     DONE ] StackOverflow.Compare  (0.782818 sec) [5000000 calls in 782818 usec] [0.156564 us/call] [6387180.672902 calls/sec]
[ BASELINE ] StackOverflow.Compare 1.133699
[ RUN      ] StackOverflow.Compare2 -- 100 samples, 5000000 calls per run.
[     DONE ] StackOverflow.Compare2  (0.700767 sec) [5000000 calls in 700767 usec] [0.140153 us/call] [7135039.178500 calls/sec]
[ BASELINE ] StackOverflow.Compare2 1.014870
[ RUN      ] StackOverflow.Compare3 -- 100 samples, 5000000 calls per run.
[     DONE ] StackOverflow.Compare3  (0.709471 sec) [5000000 calls in 709471 usec] [0.141894 us/call] [7047504.408214 calls/sec]
[ BASELINE ] StackOverflow.Compare3 1.027476
[ RUN      ] StackOverflow.Compare4 -- 100 samples, 5000000 calls per run.
[     DONE ] StackOverflow.Compare4  (0.712940 sec) [5000000 calls in 712940 usec] [0.142588 us/call] [7013212.893091 calls/sec]
[ BASELINE ] StackOverflow.Compare4 1.032500
[==========]
[ COMPLETE ]
[==========]

Given this test, it looks like Compare2 is the best option for this micro-optimization.

EDIT:

Compare2 Assembly (The best case):

cmp r8d, r9d
movzx   eax, dl
setle   BYTE PTR ret$[rsp]
cmp r8d, r9d
setge   BYTE PTR ret$[rsp+1]
movzx   eax, BYTE PTR ret$[rsp+rax]

Compare3 Assembly (The next-best case):

xor r11d, r11d
cmp r8d, r9d
mov r10d, r11d
setg    r10b
test    dl, dl
mov ecx, r11d
sete    cl
mov eax, r11d
cmp ecx, r10d
setne   al
cmp r8d, r9d
sete    r11b
or  eax, r11d
  • Interesting, but here we want to know why it is. – J.N. Apr 3 '13 at 1:09
  • I added assembly to my response. – DigitalInBlue Apr 3 '13 at 1:27
  • I'm not a fan of how you did you the benchmarking. The measured times are dominated by the cost of rand(), masking the true performance difference between the variants. – dshin Apr 3 '13 at 2:44
  • True that rand() is expensive, but the cost is identical for each test, therefore it can be factored out. What should be compared is a baselined (relative) time. That shows what is truly faster and by how much. Measuring average execution time is actually incorrect. Reference: codeproject.com/Articles/525576/… – DigitalInBlue Apr 3 '13 at 10:47
  • Given the baseline, Compare2 is 1.014870 times slower than the baseline measurement and Compare3 is 1.027476 times slower. – DigitalInBlue Apr 3 '13 at 10:55
1

How about this...

inline bool Compare3(bool greater, int p1, int p2) 
{
  return (!greater != !(p1 <= p2)) | (p1 == p2);
}

or

inline bool Compare4(bool greater, int p1, int p2) 
{
  return (greater ^ (p1 <= p2)) | (p1 == p2);
}
  • 2
    It seems to me that Compare3(true,1,1)!=Compare3(false,1,1), which would make the function incorrect. Same for Compare4(). – dshin Apr 2 '13 at 18:01
  • 1
    Add | (p1 == p2) and be happy. – Griwes Apr 2 '13 at 18:06
  • Hmm, I didn't test the code. No compiler in my home machine. Will check now. – Sharath Apr 2 '13 at 18:13
  • Damn, I missed that condition. Fixed it now. Thanks. – Sharath Apr 2 '13 at 18:42
  • 1
    This doesn't really address the question (i.e. "why the difference between Compare() and Compare2()?") – Oliver Charlesworth Apr 2 '13 at 20:38

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.