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Go complains about instantiating a struct in an if-statement. Why? Is there correct syntax for this that doesn't involve temporary variables or new functions?

type Auth struct {
    Username    string
    Password    string
}

func main() {
    auth := Auth { Username : "abc", Password : "123" }

    if auth == Auth {Username: "abc", Password: "123"} {
        fmt.Println(auth)
    }
}

Error (on the if-statement line): syntax error: unexpected :, expecting := or = or comma

This yields the same error:

if auth2 := Auth {Username: "abc", Password: "123"}; auth == auth2 {
            fmt.Println(auth)
}

This works as expected:

auth2 := Auth {Username: "abc", Password: "123"};
if  auth == auth2 {
        fmt.Println(auth)
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 19 down vote accepted

You have to surround the right side of the == with parenthesis. Otherwise go will think that the '{' is the beginning of the 'if' block. The following code works fine:

package main

import "fmt"

type Auth struct {
    Username    string
    Password    string
}

func main() {
    auth := Auth { Username : "abc", Password : "123" }
    if auth == (Auth {Username: "abc", Password: "123"}) {
        fmt.Println(auth)
    }
}

// Output: {abc 123}
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8  
For completeness' sake: "A parsing ambiguity arises when a composite literal using the TypeName form of the LiteralType appears between the keyword and the opening brace of the block of an "if", "for", or "switch" statement, because the braces surrounding the expressions in the literal are confused with those introducing the block of statements. To resolve the ambiguity in this rare case, the composite literal must appear within parentheses." - golang.org/ref/spec –  PuerkitoBio Apr 3 '13 at 1:20

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