432

Is there a common way to pass a single item of type T to a method which expects an IEnumerable<T> parameter? Language is C#, framework version 2.0.

Currently I am using a helper method (it's .Net 2.0, so I have a whole bunch of casting/projecting helper methods similar to LINQ), but this just seems silly:

public static class IEnumerableExt
{
    // usage: IEnumerableExt.FromSingleItem(someObject);
    public static IEnumerable<T> FromSingleItem<T>(T item)
    {
        yield return item; 
    }
}

Other way would of course be to create and populate a List<T> or an Array and pass it instead of IEnumerable<T>.

[Edit] As an extension method it might be named:

public static class IEnumerableExt
{
    // usage: someObject.SingleItemAsEnumerable();
    public static IEnumerable<T> SingleItemAsEnumerable<T>(this T item)
    {
        yield return item; 
    }
}

Am I missing something here?

[Edit2] We found someObject.Yield() (as @Peter suggested in the comments below) to be the best name for this extension method, mainly for brevity, so here it is along with the XML comment if anyone wants to grab it:

public static class IEnumerableExt
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Wraps this object instance into an IEnumerable&lt;T&gt;
    /// consisting of a single item.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"> Type of the object. </typeparam>
    /// <param name="item"> The instance that will be wrapped. </param>
    /// <returns> An IEnumerable&lt;T&gt; consisting of a single item. </returns>
    public static IEnumerable<T> Yield<T>(this T item)
    {
        yield return item;
    }
}
24
  • 7
    I would make a slight modification in the body of the extension method: if (item == null) yield break; Now you're stopped from passing null as well as taking advantage of the (trivial) null object pattern for IEnumerable. (foreach (var x in xs) handles an empty xs just fine). Incidentally, this function is the monadic unit for the list monad that is IEnumerable<T>, and given the monad love-fest at Microsoft I'm surprised something like this isn't in the framework in the first place. Nov 11, 2009 at 12:49
  • 4
    For the extension method, you shouldn't name it AsEnumerable because a built-in extension with that name already exists. (When T implements IEnumerable, e.g., string.)
    – Jon-Eric
    Aug 13, 2012 at 16:12
  • 25
    How about naming the method Yield? Nothing beats brevity. Nov 19, 2012 at 8:13
  • 4
    Naming suggestions here. "SingleItemAsEnumerable" a bit verbose. "Yield" describes the implementation rather than interface - which is not good. For a better name, I suggest "AsSingleton", which correspond the exact meaning of the behaviour. Mar 24, 2014 at 1:40
  • 4
    I hate the left==null check here. It breaks the beauti of the code and stops the code being more flexable -- what if some day you turn out need to generate a singleton with something that can be null? I mean, new T[] { null } is not the same as new T[] {}, and some day you may need to distinguish them. Mar 24, 2014 at 1:45

19 Answers 19

172

Well, if the method expects an IEnumerable you've got to pass something that is a list, even if it contains one element only.

passing

new[] { item }

as the argument should be enough I think

0
134

In C# 3.0 you can utilize the System.Linq.Enumerable class:

// using System.Linq

Enumerable.Repeat(item, 1);

This will create a new IEnumerable that only contains your item.

5
  • 29
    I think that this solution will make the code harder to read. :( Repeat on a single element is quite counter-intuitive don't you think?
    – Drahakar
    Apr 10, 2011 at 22:14
  • 8
    Repeat once reads ok to me. Far simpler solution without having to worry about adding yet another extension method, and ensuring the namespace is included wherever you want to use it.
    – si618
    Apr 9, 2013 at 2:20
  • 15
    Yeah I actually just use new[]{ item } myself, I just thought that was an interesting solution.
    – luksan
    Apr 9, 2013 at 3:01
  • 7
    This solution is money.
    – ProVega
    Oct 11, 2013 at 4:28
  • 2
    IMHO this should be the accepted answer. It's easy to read, concise, and it's implemented in a single line on the BCL, without a custom extension method.
    – Ryan
    Jan 7, 2020 at 6:25
109

Your helper method is the cleanest way to do it, IMO. If you pass in a list or an array, then an unscrupulous piece of code could cast it and change the contents, leading to odd behaviour in some situations. You could use a read-only collection, but that's likely to involve even more wrapping. I think your solution is as neat as it gets.

7
  • well if the list/array is built ad-hoc, its scope ends after the method call, so it shouldn't cause problems
    – Mario F
    Oct 16, 2009 at 12:55
  • If sent in as an array, how can it be changed? I guess it could be cast to an array, and then change the reference to something else, but what good would that do? (I'm probably missing something though...)
    – Svish
    Oct 16, 2009 at 12:55
  • 2
    Suppose you decided to create one enumerable to pass to two different methods... then the first one cast it to an array and changed the contents. You then pass it as an argument to another method, unaware of the change. I'm not saying it's likely, just that having something mutable when it doesn't need to be is less neat than naturla immutability.
    – Jon Skeet
    Oct 16, 2009 at 12:58
  • 3
    This is an accepted answer, and most likely to be read, so I will add my concern here. I tried this method, but that broke my previously compiling call to myDict.Keys.AsEnumerable() where myDict was of type Dictionary<CheckBox, Tuple<int, int>>. After I renamed the extension method to SingleItemAsEnumerable, everything started to work. Cannot convert IEnumerable<Dictionary<CheckBox,System.Tuple<int,int>>.KeyCollection>' to 'IEnumerable<CheckBox>'. An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?) I can live with a hack for a while, but can other power hackers find a better way? Oct 17, 2011 at 17:24
  • 3
    @HamishGrubijan: It sounds like you wanted just dictionary.Values to start with. Basically it's not clear what's going on, but I suggest you start a new question about it.
    – Jon Skeet
    Oct 17, 2011 at 17:33
43

In C# 3 (I know you said 2), you can write a generic extension method which might make the syntax a little more acceptable:

static class IEnumerableExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<T> ToEnumerable<T>(this T item)
    {
        yield return item;
    }
}

client code is then item.ToEnumerable().

2
  • Thanks, I am aware of that (works in .Net 2.0 if I use C# 3.0), I was just wondering if there was a built in mechanism for this.
    – Groo
    Oct 16, 2009 at 13:04
  • 6
    As a side note, there already exists a ToEnumerable extension method for IObservable<T>, so this method name also interferes with existing conventions. Honestly, I'd suggest not using an extension method at all, simply because it's too generic.
    – cwharris
    Nov 25, 2013 at 23:07
20

This helper method works for item or many.

public static IEnumerable<T> ToEnumerable<T>(params T[] items)
{
    return items;
}    
3
  • 1
    Useful variation, since it supports more than one item. I like that it relies on params to build the array, so resulting code is clean-looking. Haven't decided whether I like it more or less than new T[]{ item1, item2, item3 }; for multiple items. Oct 14, 2015 at 19:12
  • Smart ! Love it May 22, 2020 at 12:12
  • Given that it doesn't take a this argument so won't be applied to an object, I think AsEnumerable is a better name than ToEnumerable.
    – NetMage
    Jan 12 at 17:18
12

I'm kind of surprised that no one suggested a new overload of the method with an argument of type T to simplify the client API.

public void DoSomething<T>(IEnumerable<T> list)
{
    // Do Something
}

public void DoSomething<T>(T item)
{
    DoSomething(new T[] { item });
}

Now your client code can just do this:

MyItem item = new MyItem();
Obj.DoSomething(item);

or with a list:

List<MyItem> itemList = new List<MyItem>();
Obj.DoSomething(itemList);
2
  • 21
    Even better, you could have DoSomething<T>(params T[] items) which means the compiler would handle the conversion from a single item to an array. (This would also allow you to pass in multiple separate items and, again, the compiler would handle converting them to an array for you.)
    – LukeH
    Oct 16, 2009 at 13:26
  • I think I like this one more too, it can use new[] { item } without the generic parameter T and keeps the client use syntax cleaner if used many times.
    – Kioshiki
    Dec 8, 2021 at 19:28
8

Either (as has previously been said)

MyMethodThatExpectsAnIEnumerable(new[] { myObject });

or

MyMethodThatExpectsAnIEnumerable(Enumerable.Repeat(myObject, 1));

As a side note, the last version can also be nice if you want an empty list of an anonymous object, e.g.

var x = MyMethodThatExpectsAnIEnumerable(Enumerable.Repeat(new { a = 0, b = "x" }, 0));
1
  • Thanks, although Enumerable.Repeat is new in .Net 3.5. It seems to behave similar to the helper method above.
    – Groo
    Oct 16, 2009 at 13:28
8

I agree with @EarthEngine's comments to the original post, which is that 'AsSingleton' is a better name. See this wikipedia entry. Then it follows from the definition of singleton that if a null value is passed as an argument that 'AsSingleton' should return an IEnumerable with a single null value instead of an empty IEnumerable which would settle the if (item == null) yield break; debate. I think the best solution is to have two methods: 'AsSingleton' and 'AsSingletonOrEmpty'; where, in the event that a null is passed as an argument, 'AsSingleton' will return a single null value and 'AsSingletonOrEmpty' will return an empty IEnumerable. Like this:

public static IEnumerable<T> AsSingletonOrEmpty<T>(this T source)
{
    if (source == null)
    {
        yield break;
    }
    else
    {
        yield return source;
    }
}

public static IEnumerable<T> AsSingleton<T>(this T source)
{
    yield return source;
}

Then, these would, more or less, be analogous to the 'First' and 'FirstOrDefault' extension methods on IEnumerable which just feels right.

0
7

As I have just found, and seen that user LukeH suggested too, a nice simple way of doing this is as follows:

public static void PerformAction(params YourType[] items)
{
    // Forward call to IEnumerable overload
    PerformAction(items.AsEnumerable());
}

public static void PerformAction(IEnumerable<YourType> items)
{
    foreach (YourType item in items)
    {
        // Do stuff
    }
}

This pattern will allow you to call the same functionality in a multitude of ways: a single item; multiple items (comma-separated); an array; a list; an enumeration, etc.

I'm not 100% sure on the efficiency of using the AsEnumerable method though, but it does work a treat.

Update: The AsEnumerable function looks pretty efficient! (reference)

4
  • 2
    Actually, you don't need .AsEnumerable() at all. Array YourType[] already implements IEnumerable<YourType>. But my question was referring to the case when only the second method (in your example) is available, and you are using .NET 2.0, and you want to pass a single item.
    – Groo
    Nov 10, 2010 at 12:08
  • 3
    Yes, it does, but you'll find you may get a stack overflow ;-)
    – teppicymon
    Nov 10, 2010 at 15:52
  • And to actually answer your real question (not the one I was actually looking to answer for myself!), yeah you pretty much have to convert it to an array as per Mario's answer
    – teppicymon
    Nov 10, 2010 at 15:53
  • 2
    How about just defining an IEnumerable<T> MakeEnumerable<T>(params T[] items) {return items;} method? One could then use that with anything that expected an IEnumerable<T>, for any number of discrete items. The code should be essentially as efficient as defining a special class to return a single item.
    – supercat
    Sep 21, 2012 at 18:40
7

Although it's overkill for one method, I believe some people may find the Interactive Extensions useful.

The Interactive Extensions (Ix) from Microsoft includes the following method.

public static IEnumerable<TResult> Return<TResult>(TResult value)
{
    yield return value;
}

Which can be utilized like so:

var result = EnumerableEx.Return(0);

Ix adds new functionality not found in the original Linq extension methods, and is a direct result of creating the Reactive Extensions (Rx).

Think, Linq Extension Methods + Ix = Rx for IEnumerable.

You can find both Rx and Ix on CodePlex.

6

This is 30% faster than yield or Enumerable.Repeat when used in foreach due to this C# compiler optimization, and of the same performance in other cases.

public struct SingleSequence<T> : IEnumerable<T> {
    public struct SingleEnumerator : IEnumerator<T> {
        private readonly SingleSequence<T> _parent;
        private bool _couldMove;
        public SingleEnumerator(ref SingleSequence<T> parent) {
            _parent = parent;
            _couldMove = true;
        }
        public T Current => _parent._value;
        object IEnumerator.Current => Current;
        public void Dispose() { }

        public bool MoveNext() {
            if (!_couldMove) return false;
            _couldMove = false;
            return true;
        }
        public void Reset() {
            _couldMove = true;
        }
    }
    private readonly T _value;
    public SingleSequence(T value) {
        _value = value;
    }
    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator() {
        return new SingleEnumerator(ref this);
    }
    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() {
        return new SingleEnumerator(ref this);
    }
}

in this test:

    // Fastest among seqs, but still 30x times slower than direct sum
    // 49 mops vs 37 mops for yield, or c.30% faster
    [Test]
    public void SingleSequenceStructForEach() {
        var sw = new Stopwatch();
        sw.Start();
        long sum = 0;
        for (var i = 0; i < 100000000; i++) {
            foreach (var single in new SingleSequence<int>(i)) {
                sum += single;
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine($"Elapsed {sw.ElapsedMilliseconds}");
        Console.WriteLine($"Mops {100000.0 / sw.ElapsedMilliseconds * 1.0}");
    }
8
  • Thanks, it makes sense to create a struct for this case to reduce GC burden in tight loops.
    – Groo
    Dec 2, 2015 at 10:02
  • 1
    Both the enumerator and enumerable are going to get boxed when returned.... Apr 3, 2017 at 6:45
  • 2
    Don't compare using Stopwatch. Use Benchmark.NET github.com/dotnet/BenchmarkDotNet
    – NN_
    Nov 5, 2018 at 10:54
  • 4
    Just measured it and new [] { i } option is about 3.2 times faster then your option. Also your option is about 1.2 times faster then extension with yield return.
    – lorond
    May 20, 2019 at 15:02
  • You can speed this up by using another C# compiler optimization: add a method SingleEnumerator GetEnumerator() that returns your struct. The C# compiler will use this method (it looks it up via duck typing) instead of the interface ones and thus avoids boxing. Many built-in collections utilize this trick, like List. Note: this will only work when you have a direct refercne to SingleSequence, like in your example. If you store it in an IEnumerable<> variable then the trick won't work (the interface method will be used)
    – enzi
    Mar 24, 2020 at 16:26
4

This may not be any better but it's kind of cool:

Enumerable.Range(0, 1).Select(i => item);
3
  • It's not. It's different.
    – nawfal
    Jun 10, 2014 at 10:29
  • 2
    Ewww. That's a lot of detail, just to turn an item into an enumerable. Oct 14, 2015 at 19:17
  • 4
    This is the equivalent of using a Rube Goldberg machine to make breakfast. Yes it works, but it jumps through 10 hoops to get there. A simple thing like this can be the performance bottleneck when done in a tight loop that's executed millions of times. In practice, the performance aspect doesn't matter in 99% of cases, but personally I still think it's gross unnecessary overkill.
    – enzi
    Mar 24, 2020 at 16:42
4

I recently asked the same thing on another post

Is there a way to call a C# method requiring an IEnumerable<T> with a single value? ...with benchmarking.

I wanted people stopping by here to see the brief benchmark comparison shown at that newer post for 4 of the approaches presented in these answers.

It seems that simply writing new[] { x } in the arguments to the method is the shortest and fastest solution.

3

Sometimes I do this, when I'm feeling impish:

"_".Select(_ => 3.14)  // or whatever; any type is fine

This is the same thing with less shift key presses, heh:

from _ in "_" select 3.14

For a utility function I find this to be the least verbose, or at least more self-documenting than an array, although it'll let multiple values slide; as a plus it can be defined as a local function:

static IEnumerable<T> Enumerate (params T[] v) => v;
// usage:
IEnumerable<double> example = Enumerate(1.234);

Here are all of the other ways I was able to think of (runnable here):

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

public class Program {
    
    public static IEnumerable<T> ToEnumerable1 <T> (T v) {
        yield return v;
    }
    
    public static T[] ToEnumerable2 <T> (params T[] vs) => vs;
    
    public static void Main () {
        static IEnumerable<T> ToEnumerable3 <T> (params T[] v) => v;
        p( new string[] { "three" } );
        p( new List<string> { "three" } );
        p( ToEnumerable1("three") ); // our utility function (yield return)
        p( ToEnumerable2("three") ); // our utility function (params)
        p( ToEnumerable3("three") ); // our local utility function (params)
        p( Enumerable.Empty<string>().Append("three") );
        p( Enumerable.Empty<string>().DefaultIfEmpty("three") );
        p( Enumerable.Empty<string>().Prepend("three") );
        p( Enumerable.Range(3, 1) ); // only for int
        p( Enumerable.Range(0, 1).Select(_ => "three") );
        p( Enumerable.Repeat("three", 1) );
        p( "_".Select(_ => "three") ); // doesn't have to be "_"; just any one character
        p( "_".Select(_ => 3.3333) );
        p( from _ in "_" select 3.0f );
        p( "a" ); // only for char
        // these weren't available for me to test (might not even be valid):
        //   new Microsoft.Extensions.Primitives.StringValues("three")
        
    }

    static void p <T> (IEnumerable<T> e) =>
        Console.WriteLine(string.Join(' ', e.Select((v, k) => $"[{k}]={v,-8}:{v.GetType()}").DefaultIfEmpty("<empty>")));

}
2
  • 1
    Evil hack :) But I don't think you need parentheses around the _ parameter, just .Select(_ => 3.333).
    – Groo
    Jun 11, 2021 at 18:30
  • @Groo Thanks! I regularly forget that. Tested and fixed.
    – Jason C
    Jun 11, 2021 at 20:17
2

The easiest way I'd say would be new T[]{item};; there's no syntax to do this. The closest equivalent that I can think of is the params keyword, but of course that requires you to have access to the method definition and is only usable with arrays.

2
Enumerable.Range(1,1).Select(_ => {
    //Do some stuff... side effects...
    return item;
});

The above code is useful when using like

var existingOrNewObject = MyData.Where(myCondition)
       .Concat(Enumerable.Range(1,1).Select(_ => {
           //Create my object...
           return item;
       })).Take(1).First();

In the above code snippet there is no empty/null check, and it is guaranteed to have only one object returned without afraid of exceptions. Furthermore, because it is lazy, the closure will not be executed until it is proved there is no existing data fits the criteria.

2
  • This answer was automatically tagged "low quality". As explained in the help ("Brevity is acceptable, but fuller explanations are better."), please edit it to tell the OP what he's doing wrong, what your code is about. Jul 5, 2019 at 6:02
  • I see the bulk of this answer, including the part I'm responding to, was edited in later by someone else. but if the intent of the second snippet is to provide a default value if MyData.Where(myCondition) is empty, that's already possible (and simpler) with DefaultIfEmpty(): var existingOrNewObject = MyData.Where(myCondition).DefaultIfEmpty(defaultValue).First();. That can be further simplified to var existingOrNewObject = MyData.FirstOrDefault(myCondition); if you want default(T) and not a custom value. May 20, 2020 at 2:01
2

To be filed under "Not necessarily a good solution, but still...a solution" or "Stupid LINQ tricks", you could combine Enumerable.Empty<>() with Enumerable.Append<>()...

IEnumerable<string> singleElementEnumerable = Enumerable.Empty<string>().Append("Hello, World!");

...or Enumerable.Prepend<>()...

IEnumerable<string> singleElementEnumerable = Enumerable.Empty<string>().Prepend("Hello, World!");

The latter two methods are available since .NET Framework 4.7.1 and .NET Core 1.0.

This is a workable solution if one were really intent on using existing methods instead of writing their own, though I'm undecided if this is more or less clear than the Enumerable.Repeat<>() solution. This is definitely longer code (partly due to type parameter inference not being possible for Empty<>()) and creates twice as many enumerator objects, however.

Rounding out this "Did you know these methods exist?" answer, Array.Empty<>() could be substituted for Enumerable.Empty<>(), but it's hard to argue that makes the situation...better.

0

I'm a bit late to the party but I'll share my way anyway. My problem was that I wanted to bind the ItemSource or a WPF TreeView to a single object. The hierarchy looks like this:

Project > Plot(s) > Room(s)

There was always going to be only one Project but I still wanted to Show the project in the Tree, without having to pass a Collection with only that one object in it like some suggested.
Since you can only pass IEnumerable objects as ItemSource I decided to make my class IEnumerable:

public class ProjectClass : IEnumerable<ProjectClass>
{
    private readonly SingleItemEnumerator<AufmassProjekt> enumerator;

    ... 

    public IEnumerator<ProjectClass > GetEnumerator() => this.enumerator;

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() => this.GetEnumerator();
}

And create my own Enumerator accordingly:

public class SingleItemEnumerator : IEnumerator
{
    private bool hasMovedOnce;

    public SingleItemEnumerator(object current)
    {
        this.Current = current;
    }

    public bool MoveNext()
    {
        if (this.hasMovedOnce) return false;
        this.hasMovedOnce = true;
        return true;
    }

    public void Reset()
    { }

    public object Current { get; }
}

public class SingleItemEnumerator<T> : IEnumerator<T>
{
    private bool hasMovedOnce;

    public SingleItemEnumerator(T current)
    {
        this.Current = current;
    }

    public void Dispose() => (this.Current as IDisposable).Dispose();

    public bool MoveNext()
    {
        if (this.hasMovedOnce) return false;
        this.hasMovedOnce = true;
        return true;
    }

    public void Reset()
    { }

    public T Current { get; }

    object IEnumerator.Current => this.Current;
}

This is probably not the "cleanest" solution but it worked for me.

EDIT
To uphold the single responsibility principle as @Groo pointed out I created a new wrapper class:

public class SingleItemWrapper : IEnumerable
{
    private readonly SingleItemEnumerator enumerator;

    public SingleItemWrapper(object item)
    {
        this.enumerator = new SingleItemEnumerator(item);
    }

    public object Item => this.enumerator.Current;

    public IEnumerator GetEnumerator() => this.enumerator;
}

public class SingleItemWrapper<T> : IEnumerable<T>
{
    private readonly SingleItemEnumerator<T> enumerator;

    public SingleItemWrapper(T item)
    {
        this.enumerator = new SingleItemEnumerator<T>(item);
    }

    public T Item => this.enumerator.Current;

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator() => this.enumerator;

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() => this.GetEnumerator();
}

Which I used like this

TreeView.ItemSource = new SingleItemWrapper(itemToWrap);

EDIT 2
I corrected a mistake with the MoveNext() method.

1
  • 1
    The SingleItemEnumerator<T> class makes sense, but making a class a "single item IEnumerable of itself" seems like a violation of the single responsibility principle. Perhaps it makes passing it around more practical, but I would still prefer to wrap it as needed.
    – Groo
    Aug 22, 2018 at 11:26
0

I prefer

public static IEnumerable<T> Collect<T>(this T item, params T[] otherItems)
{
    yield return item;
    foreach (var otherItem in otherItems)
    {
        yield return otherItem;
    }
}

This lets you call item.Collect() if you want the singleton, but it also lets you call item.Collect(item2, item3) if you want

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