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I know

$ :: (a->b) -> a -> b
f $ x = f x

Intuitively it seems to me, like to say, 1. $ delays the evaluation of the function to its left 2. evaluates whats to its right 3. feeds the result of its left to its right.

And it makes perfect sense to me when,

ghci> length $ [1..5]
5
ghci> ($) length [1..5]
5

What I do not understand is why,

ghci> ($ [1..5]) length
5

Judging from the type of $, isn't that its (first) argument should be a function ?

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13  
This isn't about ($), but about operator sections. – phg Apr 3 '13 at 10:27
9  
$ doesn't delay evaluation of the function to it's left. You may be confusing it with $!, which forces partial evaluation of the argument to its right before feeding it to the function to its left. – dave4420 Apr 3 '13 at 10:28
    
This is "section" syntax at work. haskell.org/onlinereport/haskell2010/… – Don Stewart Apr 3 '13 at 10:32
1  
And as to what this is good for: you can use it when you want to apply a list of functions to one value: map ($ [1..5]) [length,sum,product]. – phg Apr 3 '13 at 10:35
    
@dave4420 id $! x == x `seq` id x doesn't force anything, or so I've been told. – Will Ness Apr 3 '13 at 10:41
up vote 15 down vote accepted

This has to do with parsing. In Haskell you can write (op arg) where op is an infix operator. This is not the same as ((op) arg). And you can write (arg op) as well! For example:

GHCi, version 7.0.3: http://www.haskell.org/ghc/  :? for help
Prelude> :t (+ 4)
(+ 4) :: Num a => a -> a
Prelude> :t (4 +)
(4 +) :: Num a => a -> a

That is, (+ 4) is the function \x -> x + 4 and (4 +) is the function \y -> 4 + y. In the case of addition these are equal functions, but that is not really important right now.

Now let us try the same trick on $:

Prelude> :t ($ [1,2,3,4])
($ [1,2,3,4]) :: Num t => ([t] -> b) -> b

Now surprise so far, we got \f -> f $ [1,2,3,4]. We can also write

Prelude> :t (length $)
(length $) :: [a] -> Int

to get the function \l -> length $ l. But how about this:

Prelude> :t ($ length)
($ length) :: (([a] -> Int) -> b) -> b

This is strange, but it makes sense! We got \f -> f $ length, i.e., a functional which expects to get a function f of type ([a] -> Int) -> b) that will be applied to length. There is a fourth possibility:

Prelude> :t ([1,2,3,4] $)

<interactive>:1:2:
    Couldn't match expected type `a0 -> b0' with actual type `[t0]'
    In the first argument of `($)', namely `[1, 2, 3, 4]'
    In the expression: ([1, 2, 3, 4] $)

Everything is as it should be because [1,2,3,4] is not a function. What if we write $ in parenthesis? Then its special meaning as an infix operator disappears:

Prelude> :t (($) length)
(($) length) :: [a] -> Int

Prelude> :t (($) [1,2,3,4])
<interactive>:1:6:
    Couldn't match expected type `a0 -> b0' with actual type `[t0]'
    In the first argument of `($)', namely `[1, 2, 3, 4]'
    In the expression: (($) [1, 2, 3, 4])

Prelude> :t (length ($))
<interactive>:1:9:
    Couldn't match expected type `[a0]'
                with actual type `(a1 -> b0) -> a1 -> b0'
    In the first argument of `length', namely `($)'
    In the expression: (length ($))

Prelude> :t ([1,2,3,4] ($))
<interactive>:1:2:
    The function `[1, 2, 3, 4]' is applied to one argument,
    but its type `[t0]' has none
    In the expression: ([1, 2, 3, 4] ($))

So, to answer your question: $ [1,2,3,4] is parsed as \f -> f $ [1,2,3,4] so it makes perfect sense to apply it to length. However ($) [1, 2, 3, 4] does not make much sense because ($) is not seen as an infix operator.

By the way, $ does "not do anything", so to speak. It is mostly used for more readable input because it has low precedence and so we can write f $ g $ h $ x instead of f (g (h x)).

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1  
- may have been a bad choice of example, as it's the one and only exception where (op arg) does not represent a function. – Scott Olson Apr 3 '13 at 10:44
1  
Also, both ((-) 4) and (4 -) are the same function, (\x -> 4 - x). – Scott Olson Apr 3 '13 at 10:45
    
Does it mean because (-) is left associated, both ((-) 4) and (4 -) means (\x -> 4 - x), while ($) is right associated, both ($ func) and ($ arg) means (\x -> bar $ a) where a means func or arg ? – Znatz Apr 3 '13 at 11:29
1  
This has nothing to do with associativity. The thing which is confusing @Znatz is that f $ length makes sense if f has the correct type. Thus Haskell is parsing $ length as \f -> f $ length, just like $ [1,2,3,4] is parsed as \f -> f $ [1,2,3,4]. – Andrej Bauer Apr 3 '13 at 11:43
1  
It's because ((-) 4) isn't an operator section at all. It's just normal partial application of -, and it is given its arguments left-or-right like every other function. Since it takes its left argument first, you get (\x -> 4 - x). – Scott Olson Apr 3 '13 at 14:32

Your question is really about what is called operator sections. With any operator in Haskell (I will use + as an example) you can write something like (+ arg) or (arg +). These are just shorthand syntax for the anonymous functions (\x -> x + arg) and (\x -> arg + x), respectively.

So, the ($ [1..5]) syntax just means (\x -> x $ [1..5]) which is the same as (\x -> x [1..5]) (ie. a function which passes [1..5] to the function passed as its argument).

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This (\x -> x $ [1..5]) really clears up my confusion! – Znatz Apr 3 '13 at 11:12

($ [1..5]) is a section. That's a partially applied operator. It's a shorthand for (\f -> f $ [1..5]).

Sections let you supply one argument to a binary operator and produce a function - a function which is waiting for the remaining argument.

Take a look at http://www.haskell.org/haskellwiki/Section_of_an_infix_operator

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