42

I have a class semantic which I apply to many different elements. Depending on which html tag the class is applied to, I would like it to apply a different style. This is how I tried to do it:

.semantic {
    &ul {
        padding: 0;
        margin: 0;
    }
    &p {
        margin: 0;
    }
}

This doesn't work. Of course I could write it like this, but it wouldn't be very "DRY":

 .semantic ul {
    padding: 0;
    margin: 0;
 }

 .semantic p {
     margin: 0;
 }

Is this possible?

Edit: For clarification, here is an example of what my HTML looks like:

<ul class='semantic'>
    <li>An Item</li>
</ul>

<p class='semantic'>This text is semantically a paragraph, but should not be displayed as such</p>
0
28

What you're wanting for would in theory look like this:

.semantic {
    ul& {
        padding: 0;
        margin: 0;
    }
    p& {
        margin: 0;
    }
}

This is not possible because the & must be first. You're just going to have to deal with the fact that it isn't DRY and write it out by hand:

ul.semantic {
    padding: 0;
    margin: 0;
}

p.semantic {
    margin: 0;
}

As of Sass 3.3 or 3.4, it is possible using this syntax:

.semantic {
    ul#{&} {
        padding: 0;
        margin: 0;
    }
    p#{&} {
        margin: 0;
    }
}
5
  • 2
    it's not necessary that & be first. The only strict requirement is that & must be surrounded by spaces or those special css selector characters ~, >, etc. – kumarharsh Sep 29 '13 at 1:06
  • 12
    This does not work for me. In Sass 3.4.16 your wxample generates .semantic ul.semantic {padding: 0; margin: 0;} .semantic p.semantic {margin: 0;} – KevinH Jan 26 '16 at 13:03
  • This doesn't work in Sass 3.4.21. Instead the solution of @jruz works well. – e1v Apr 4 '17 at 14:35
  • Thanks man. It helped me a lot and works well :) – Pragnesh Chaudhari Sep 21 '17 at 15:59
  • Clever. Never knew you could do this, but very handy. – HartleySan May 3 '20 at 15:33
59

On Sass 3.4:

.semantic {
    @at-root {
      ul#{&} {
        padding: 0;
        margin: 0;
      }
      p#{&} {
        margin: 0;
      }
    }
}

Generates:

ul.semantic {
  padding: 0;
  margin: 0;
}

p.semantic {
  margin: 0;
}

@at-root moves the block to the top-level. This has several uses (see link) but here it's being used to keep take advantage of the & syntax without implying that the rules are child selectors of .semantic.

5
  • 1
    Can you explain how/why this works? – Peanut Jun 5 '15 at 14:42
  • Is this possible with two classes? eg: .semantic, .semantic2 {} – Coburn Dec 6 '17 at 18:54
  • 2
    This should be the accepted answer – James Hill Jan 30 '18 at 14:21
  • Correlated info: unfortunatelly it will not works with nested style, because it will apply directly to root element (which make sense once you are using @at-root special selector), not to the parent (jsfiddle.net/4g5fL5sp/1). – David Rodrigues Apr 6 '18 at 22:50
  • for the record, @at-root ul#{&} (on one line) works to – commonpike Oct 30 '20 at 11:50
0

Because of how CSS specificity works you could just do this:

.semantic {
  margin: 0; 
}

ul.semantic {
  padding: 0;
}

In your HTML, p.semantic and ul.semantic would have margin: 0; and only ul.semantic would have padding: 0;

Less Sass, less CSS. DRY.

If, unlike your example, elements on the real site have even less in common, you might want to rethink why they need to have the same class name.

1
  • 1
    The part I was trying to avoid was having to specify .semantic for each one. One of the great advantages of SASS is it's nesting. I was trying to avoid having the class name specified more than once (to keep it DRY). – Jordan Eldredge Apr 4 '13 at 20:14

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