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I have a Java project, built with Maven, that aggregates several components, each one in its own Maven project. Any one of these components may evolve separately.

The structure of my project can be described as follows:

  • my-main-project that depends on:
    • my-component-1
    • my-component-2
    • etc.

Nowadays, all pom.xml are using "snapshot" versions, so, they are all using the "latest" version available in my repository.

But once I send a release version to my customer, I'm supposed to freeze the versions and make a TAG (or equivalent) in my source-control, so I can restore a previous state in case of maintenance.

So, my question is: should I change all pom.xml files before each release, give version numbers to the components, and tie everything with this dependency versions? Also, if I have many components (my project currenty has 30+ small subcomponents) would I have to renumber/reversion each one before each release? When a single component evolves (due to bug fix or enhancement), must I increase its version so that the changes do not affect pre-existing releases, right?

How people using maven generally handle this many-component versioning case?

Of course, I could just rely on my version-control tags to restore to a previous point-in-time and just tag every component on each release, but I don't like this approach, since the dependency versioning (with maven) gives me much more control and visibility about what is packaged, and relations of (broken-)compatibility and many more.

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General Considerations

You may consider some relations between your components. Are they really independant (each one vs each other) ? Or is there some kinds of relation ... some commons lifecycles ?

If you find some relationship between them, consider using maven multi-modules : http://www.sonatype.com/books/mvnex-book/reference/multimodule.html. In a few words, you will have a parent, with one version, and some modules (some jars .. in a way like Spring and its submodules). This will help you to reduce versions management.

You may consider using maven-release-plugin. It will help you to tag, build and deploy automatically your modules, dealing more easily with versionning and links with SCM and Repository. Moreover, combine with multi-module it would drastically help you !

There is a lot of topic dealing with this on Stack Overflow.

I don't know if you already know that. I could explain it a lot further if you want, but you may have enough elements to search by yourself if you don't.

Straight Answers

So, my question is: should I change all pom.xml files before each release, give version numbers to the components, and tie everything with this dependency versions?

Yes you should. In Application Lifecycle Management follow the changes is REALLY important. So, as you could imagine, and as you point it out, you really should build and tag each of your components. It could be painful, but maven-realease-plugin and multi module (even with a Continuous Integration plateform) it could be easier.

would I have to renumber/reversion each one before each release?

For exactly the same reasons : yes !

must I increase its version so that the changes do not affect pre-existing releases, right?

Yes, you should too. Assuming you choose a common versionning like MAJOR.minor.correction, the first number indicate compatibilty breaks. Minor version would bring some breaks, but should not. Corrections whould NEVER affect compatibility.

How people using maven generally handle this many-component versioning case?

I cannot reply for every one, but my previous comments on release-plugin and multi-module considered as best pratices. If you want to a little bit further, you can imagine use more powerfull SCM (Clearcase, Perforce, ...), but maven integration is fewer, not "well" documented and community provide less examples than SVN or Git.

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Maven Release Plugin

If you are using a multi-module pom.xml you should be able to do mvn release -DautoVersionSubmodules and have it do a "release" build of all your dependencies and remove the -SNAPSHOT versions and upload them to your repository. That is what the release plugin and its workflow exists solely to do.

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