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i'm working on an already started web project and noticed content generated through HTML editor is encoded with base64 prior being stored in database. I suppose previous developers were doing that just in case the users wrote some character which could be unknown for the database engine, i mean for languages with not installed charsets, but i'm wondering if that's a good practice or behaviour.

The issue here is not how to store a bunch of data where CLOB fits fine but how to handle unknown characters.

Could anyone point me to the right direction for storing HTML text generated through an HTML editor? Do i really have to bother about it or just assume my database is going to support any language charset?

Thanks

  • Why didn't you choose proper encoding when installing your DBMS? Even Unicode charset? – Amir Pashazadeh Apr 23 '13 at 17:13
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What you need to do is make sure the html page and database charsets are the same or the database is a superset of the html page.

A good web programmer will make sure that the web server and html content have the same charset.

The web server charset is set in the web server config file, for example in apache it is:

AddDefaultCharset windows-1252

The html page charset is defined in a meta tag as:

<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=windows-1252"/>

Then make sure the database is supporting the same charset or is a superset. If all of this is good, then you will not need to turn strings into base64.

Even if the charsets are out of whack, there is a good possibility that is unnecessary converting to base64.

Browsers and web servers convert characters based on their charset. So for example, the radical sign is 1 character in utf8 where as in windows-1252 it becomes 6 characters: "&#8730"

Best advice I can give is to check charsets in the db, web server and html page. And test using html extended characters.

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