492

I would like to use the grunt-contrib-jasmine NPM package. It has various dependencies. Part of the dependency graph looks like this:

─┬ grunt-contrib-jasmine@0.4.1
 │ ├─┬ grunt-lib-phantomjs@0.2.0
 │ │ ├─┬ phantomjs@1.8.2-2

Unfortunately, there's a bug in this version phantomjs which prevents it from installing correctly on Mac OS X. This is fixed in the latest version.

How can I get grunt-lib-phantomjs to use a newer version of phantomjs?

Some additional context:

4
  • 1
    Just git clone or fork required module. You can also remove nested phantomjs manually. Apr 4, 2013 at 12:16
  • 5
    grunt-contrib-jasmine is on 0.5.1, which uses grunt-lib-phantomjs@0.3.1, which uses phantomjs@1.9.1-0 :) Jul 2, 2013 at 11:40
  • 1
    npm plans to release overrides in the future
    – jchook
    Dec 23, 2020 at 21:30
  • 1
    overrides are now a built-in feature. See my answer below. Dec 28, 2021 at 18:21

9 Answers 9

287

You can use npm shrinkwrap functionality, in order to override any dependency or sub-dependency.

I've just done this in a grunt project of ours. We needed a newer version of connect, since 2.7.3. was causing trouble for us. So I created a file named npm-shrinkwrap.json:

{
  "dependencies": {
    "grunt-contrib-connect": {
      "version": "0.3.0",
      "from": "grunt-contrib-connect@0.3.0",
      "dependencies": {
        "connect": {
          "version": "2.8.1",
          "from": "connect@~2.7.3"
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

npm should automatically pick it up while doing the install for the project.

(See: https://nodejs.org/en/blog/npm/managing-node-js-dependencies-with-shrinkwrap/)

13
  • 9
    When I do this, only the grunt-contrib-connect dependency and its children are installed. All my other dependencies in package.json are not installed.
    – iDVB
    Apr 23, 2015 at 0:40
  • 6
    I had the same issue as @iDVB. I ended up editing the node_modules directory so that the full shrinkwrap dependency dump was exactly what I wanted, not just overrides. But still a kind of painful solution.
    – Kobold
    Aug 5, 2015 at 15:06
  • 2
    @Domi this file is created by running npm shrinkwrap, the entries are not added by hand
    – glasspill
    Dec 1, 2015 at 12:57
  • 18
    Unfortunately, as is mentioned in that bug, with npm4, the minimalistic approach no longer works. (When deleting node_modules, running an install with a minimal shrinkwrap seems to leave devDependencies intact though ignoring dependencies, but running another install removes the non-explicit items, so for now it is important to run npm shrinkwrap to get a full file, modify the portion in question, and then run npm install again) Feb 21, 2017 at 3:34
  • 16
    npm 6.4 will just overwrite the shrinkwrap file and use the outdated dependencies Feb 1, 2019 at 17:03
148

As of npm cli v8.3.0 (2021-12-09) this can be solved using the overrides field of package.json. As described in StriplingWarrior's answer

For example, the project has typescript version 4.6.2 as direct development dependency and awesome-typescript-loader that uses old version 2.7 of typescript. Here is how you can tell npm to use version 4.6.2 of typescript for awesome-typescript-loader:

{
  "name": "myproject",
  "version": "0.0.0",
  "scripts": ...
  "dependencies": ...
  "devDependencies": {
    "typescript": "~4.6.2",
    "awesome-typescript-loader": "^5.2.1",
    ...
  },
  "overrides": {
    "awesome-typescript-loader": {
      "typescript": "$typescript"
    }
  }
}

If you don't use typescript as direct development dependency, then you have to write 4.6.2 instead of $typescript in overrides section:

{
  "name": "myproject",
  "version": "0.0.0",
  "scripts": ...
  "dependencies": ...
  "devDependencies": {
    "awesome-typescript-loader": "^5.2.1",
    ...
  },
  "overrides": {
    "awesome-typescript-loader": {
      "typescript": "~4.6.2"
    }
  }
}

Same overrides can be used for both dependencies and devDependencies.


If you're using npm version >5 but <8.3.0: edit your package-lock.json: remove the library from "requires" section and add it under "dependencies".

For example, you want deglob package to use glob package version 3.2.11 instead of its current one. You open package-lock.json and see:

"deglob": {
  "version": "2.1.0",
  "resolved": "https://registry.npmjs.org/deglob/-/deglob-2.1.0.tgz",
  "integrity": "sha1-TUSr4W7zLHebSXK9FBqAMlApoUo=",
  "requires": {
    "find-root": "1.1.0",
    "glob": "7.1.2",
    "ignore": "3.3.5",
    "pkg-config": "1.1.1",
    "run-parallel": "1.1.6",
    "uniq": "1.0.1"
  }
},

Remove "glob": "7.1.2", from "requires", add "dependencies" with proper version:

"deglob": {
  "version": "2.1.0",
  "resolved": "https://registry.npmjs.org/deglob/-/deglob-2.1.0.tgz",
  "integrity": "sha1-TUSr4W7zLHebSXK9FBqAMlApoUo=",
  "requires": {
    "find-root": "1.1.0",
    "ignore": "3.3.5",
    "pkg-config": "1.1.1",
    "run-parallel": "1.1.6",
    "uniq": "1.0.1"
  },
  "dependencies": {
    "glob": {
      "version": "3.2.11"
    }
  }
},

Now remove your node_modules folder, run npm ci (or npm install for old version of node/npm) and it will add missing parts to the "dependencies" section.


15
  • 7
    This is nice, as long as npm install runs one time. In my case the edits are necessary as the nested dep is causing a fail.
    – ppasler
    Mar 1, 2018 at 9:09
  • 125
    this will be removed anytime you run npm i instead of editing your package-lock.json and adding the child dependency to "dependencies" there, add the child dependency to your package.json "dependencies" section
    – trickpatty
    Mar 1, 2018 at 16:18
  • 19
    I've created a library that does exactly that for you automatically: github.com/rogeriochaves/npm-force-resolutions May 13, 2018 at 16:23
  • 19
    It works but then if I run npm install again then all the changes to package-lock.json get reverted and I get the bad version of the dep back.
    – 2rs2ts
    Jul 24, 2018 at 21:00
  • 20
    I run npm ci and this does not touch the package-lock.json
    – sschoof
    Dec 21, 2018 at 10:07
130

As of NPM v8.3, the correct way to deal with this is via the overrides section of your package.json file.

If you need to make specific changes to dependencies of your dependencies, for example replacing the version of a dependency with a known security issue, replacing an existing dependency with a fork, or making sure that the same version of a package is used everywhere, then you may add an override.

Overrides provide a way to replace a package in your dependency tree with another version, or another package entirely. These changes can be scoped as specific or as vague as desired.

To make sure the package foo is always installed as version 1.0.0 no matter what version your dependencies rely on:

{
  "overrides": {
    "foo": "1.0.0"
  }
}

There are a variety of other, more nuanced configurations allowing you to only override a package when it's a dependency of a particular package hierarchy. For more details, check out https://docs.npmjs.com/cli/v8/configuring-npm/package-json#overrides

5
  • 13
    @georgebrock please consider marking this as the correct answer -- the ecosystem has changed since you asked the question and this is a high ranking Google result
    – jcollum
    Jan 14 at 19:43
  • 5
    Consider adding "engines": { "npm": ">=8.3.0" } to your package.json to indicate that a new npm version is required
    – leumasme
    Mar 4 at 21:44
  • 1
    This tripped me up: if you use a monorepo with workspaces, you need to define overrides in the root package, not in the nested projects with the actual dependencies. Apr 13 at 12:57
  • I added this to package.json but not work with yarn install. I use yarn. But I added it that maybe anyone else possibly can use npm. I hope this is also works with npm.
    – zenon
    May 2 at 16:01
  • 1
    Great advice from @leumasme! We expanded it with engine-strict=true inside .npmrc to not only get a warning, since the dependency that needs to be overriding breaks a lot for us.
    – pavleprica
    Jun 6 at 11:16
90

The only solution that worked for me (node 12.x, npm 6.x) was using npm-force-resolutions developed by @Rogerio Chaves.

First, install it by:

npm install npm-force-resolutions --save-dev

You can add --ignore-scripts if some broken transitive dependency scripts are blocking you from installing anything.

Then in package.json define what dependency should be overridden (you must set exact version number):

"resolutions": {
  "your-dependency-name": "1.23.4"
}

and in "scripts" section add new preinstall entry:

"preinstall": "npm-force-resolutions",

Now, npm install will apply changes and force your-dependency-name to be at version 1.23.4 for all dependencies.

7
  • 2
    hint: use --save-dev flag for npm install
    – TmTron
    Aug 20, 2020 at 9:02
  • 1
    this would not work if one wants to upgrade corresponding dependency only for one particular 3rd party dependency Mar 1, 2021 at 5:33
  • 5
    Is there any built-in solution in latest versions of NPM as per year 2021? I would not like to depend on a third party library for this kind of things - manipulating dependency tree.
    – Dani P.
    Jun 24, 2021 at 22:44
  • 2
    @DaniP. npm is poor's man dependency manager, so I doubt it
    – user11153
    Jun 25, 2021 at 7:54
  • 1
    For me the preinstall command broke in Circle CI, so i used this one instead: "preinstall": "npm install --package-lock-only --ignore-scripts && npx npm-force-resolutions" See stackoverflow.com/a/67446313/6627882
    – Dabrule
    Sep 2, 2021 at 9:47
65

For those using yarn.

I tried using npm shrinkwrap until I discovered the yarn cli ignored my npm-shrinkwrap.json file.

Yarn has https://yarnpkg.com/lang/en/docs/selective-version-resolutions/ for this. Neat.

Check out this answer too: https://stackoverflow.com/a/41082766/3051080

6

Nested replacement with an entirely different package

Most of the strategies outlined in the other answers here work well if you are just interested in overriding the package's version number, but in our case, we needed to find a way to override a nested npm sub-dependency with a different package altogether. For details on why you would ever want to do this, please refer to the following question:

How to override a nested npm sub-dependency with a different package altogether (not just different package version number)?

Specify the tarball directly

For nested replacement of a package with an entirely different package using the npm-force-resolutions strategy that others have mentioned, you just need to provide a link to the tarball where you would normally specify the overriding version number.

As an example, for the case of replacing the vulnerable package, ansi-html, with the fixed fork of this package, ansi-html-community, your resolutions section of package.json should look like this:

"resolutions": {
    "ansi-html": "https://registry.npmjs.org/ansi-html-community/-/ansi-html-community-0.0.8.tgz"
}

To find the link to the tarball, use the following command, modifying your registry as necessary:

npm view ansi-html-community dist.tarball --registry=https://registry.npmjs.org/

Also, note that for npm-force-resolutions to work when you run npm install, you will need a preinstall entry under the scripts section of package.json:

  "scripts": {
    "preinstall": "npx npm-force-resolutions"
  }
1
  • 3
    Thank you, this was really useful. I thought replacing a package would have been possible by overriding using a reference e.g. "bar": "$foo" as documented in the last example here but I couldn't get it to work. But your solution did the trick and I would give an extra point for the details.
    – Mike W
    Jan 18 at 14:44
2

I had an issue where one of the nested dependency had an npm audit vulnerability, but I still wanted to maintain the parent dependency version. the npm shrinkwrap solution didn't work for me, so what I did to override the nested dependency version:

  1. Remove the nested dependency under the 'requires' section in package-lock.json
  2. Add the updated dependency under DevDependencies in package.json, so that modules that require it will still be able to access it.
  3. npm i
1
  • 3
    using npm 6 this does NOT work. npm i overwrites any change to the package lock file Dec 8, 2020 at 20:01
2

I was about to go down the npm-force-resolutions route but it seems that simply including the dependency in my own package.json fixed the problem for me.

I believe this worked in my case because the original dependency allows for patch versions of the dependency in question that I wanted to update. Thus by manually including a newer version it still fulfilled the dependency of the original dependency and will use the one I've manually added.

Example

Problem

I need to update plyr to version 3.6.9 from 3.6.8

Mine

package.json

{
  "dependencies": {
    "react-plyr": "^3.2.0"
  }
}

React Plyr

package.json

{
  "dependencies": {
    "plyr": "^3.6.8"
  }
}

Notice for the plyr dependency it starts with ^ this means it can accept any minor patches. You can learn more about that here:

https://docs.npmjs.com/about-semantic-versioning#using-semantic-versioning-to-specify-update-types-your-package-can-accept

Updating Mine

This updates the plyr dependency from my package.json.

package.json

{
  "dependencies": {
    "plyr": "^3.6.9",
    "react-plyr": "^3.2.0"
  }
}
1

@user11153 's answer worked for me locally, but when trying to do a clean install (aka deleting node_modules), I would get:

npm-force-resolutions: command not found

I had to update the preinstall script to be:

"preinstall": "npm i npm-force-resolutions && npm-force-resolutions"

Which ensures that npm-force-resolutions package is installed before attempting to run it.

That being said, if you're able to use yarn instead, I would do that and then use @Gus 's answer.

2

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