2

The @ operator returns the elements indexed by its parameters at the first level.

How would you explain the last line in the reference examples, in English:

q)d:((1 2 3;4 5 6 7);(8 9;10;11 12);(13 14;15 16 17 18;19 20))
q)d@1
(8 9;10;11 12)
q)d@1 2 / selects 2 items at the top level
((8 9;10;11 12);(13 14;15 16 17 18;19 20))

q)@[d;1 1 1;+;3]
((1 2 3;4 5 6 7);(17 18;19;20 21);(13 14;15 16 17 18;19 20))

I don't understand any of the values returned by the last @ usage.

4

For the data structure d, take those items at indices 1 1 1 and add 3. Which since you refer to the same index three times, means add 9. Break it down into steps:

q)d
(1 2 3;4 5 6 7)
(8 9;10;11 12)
(13 14;15 16 17 18;19 20)

/ use indexing to check which elements we are referring to
q)@[d;1]
8 9
10
11 12

/ adding 3 to a single index
q)@[d;1;+;3]
(1 2 3;4 5 6 7)
(11 12;13;14 15)
(13 14;15 16 17 18;19 20)

/ refer to same index multiple times
q)@[d;1 1 1;+;3]
(1 2 3;4 5 6 7)
(17 18;19;20 21)
(13 14;15 16 17 18;19 20)

The reason that referring to the same index adds 9 is due to kdb's memory management: http://www.timestored.com/kdb-guides/memory-management#reference_counting The same underlying vector is being referenced in each case, which may be a little unexpected.

  • Why the call to @[d;1] returns only the indexed element while @[d;1;+;3] returns all d elements? – Robert Kubrick Apr 4 '13 at 13:15
3

@Robert Kubrick

for your second question

Why the call to @[d;1] returns only the indexed element while @[d;1;+;3] returns all d elements?

@[d;1] only returns the list at 1 becuase it is effectively indexing into the list. It is equivalent to doing d[1] (or d@1)

 q )d:((1 2 3; 4 5 6 7);(8 9; 10 11 12); ( 13 14; 15 16 17 18; 19 20))
 q)d
 (1 2 3;4 5 6 7)
 (8 9;10 11 12)
 (13 14;15 16 17 18;19 20)
q)@[d;1]
 8 9
 10 11 12
q)d@1
8 9
10 11 12
q)d[1]
8 9
10 11 12

meanwhile doing @[d;1;+;3] will return the whole list because it is the functional application of adding 3 while indexing into 1, it is not equivalent to what you are doing with @[d;1], they are 2 different operations, it just so happens that the @ operator is overloaded with many meanings (these 2 being one of them)

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