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I want to plot two functions in different colors and point styles with a corresponding legend, in plain R.

I have several questions:

  1. I am using pch=21 and pch=22. My understanding is that they are "filled" symbols. They do appear filled as expected in the legend, but they appear hollow on the graph itself. What's wrong?

  2. Can I get more space between the points without specifying a grid manually? maybe by selecting the number of points to be printed?

  3. Feel free to add any kind of advice you'd like. I'm very new to R. In particular, is there a better way to plot two functions? e.g. by defining vectors of functions? and wouldn't there be a way for the legend to be automagically generated without having to specify colors and shapes, in plain R?

Here's my code:

par(new=TRUE)
p1 <- plot(function(x){ x^(2)/2 }
       , 0, 100
       , xlab = "x"
       , ylab = "y"
       , ylim = c(0,5000)
       , las = 1
       , type = "p"
       , cex = 0.8
       , pch = 21
       , col = "red"
)
par(new=TRUE)
p2 <- plot(function(x){ (1-x^(2))/2 }
       , 0, 100
       , xlab = ""
       , ylab = ""
       , axes = FALSE
       , type = "p"
       , cex = 0.8
       , pch = 22
       , col = "blue"
)
par(new=TRUE)
l <- legend( "topleft"
         , inset = c(0,0.4) 
         , cex = 1.5
         , bty = "n"
         , legend = c("A", "B")
         , text.col = c("red", "blue")
         , pt.bg = c("red","blue")
         , pch = c(21,22)
)

After various explorations, I opted to use the par(new=TRUE) "trick" to superimpose the two functions (rather than, say, using matplot or a combination of plot and points or layout). Was that a bad move to begin with? (Edit: yes, very bad, see below) +1 if you don't ask me to read the manual ;-)

enter image description here

Edit: Summary of Solutions

Thanks to joran and Didzis Elferts, I got a solution to several of my problems. For the record, I'd like to summarize here:

  1. To get filled symbols on the graph, you need to specify both col (color) and bg (background). This is true even for pch=21 and pch=22, which do not automatically get filled by the color specified. To get filled symbols in the legend, you need to specify both col and pt.bg. Here, bg alone is not good enough.

  2. it's a very bad idea to use par(new=TRUE) with axes=FALSE, as I had done initially, because, the overlaid plots do not necessarily use the same coordinate system. The intended function for the second plot was (100^2-x^2)/2 but I inadvertently wrote (1-x^2)/2 and did not realize it because I had set axes=FALSE.

All in all, here is my preferred solution:

curve( x^2/2
  , from = 0
  , to = 100
  , n = 30
  , type = "p"
  , pch = 21 # alternatively pch=15 is a solid symbol
  , col = "red" # colors the outline of hollow symbol pch=21
  , bg = "red" # fills hollow symbol pch=21 with color
  , xlab = "x"
  , ylab = "y"
)
curve( (100^2-x^2)/2
  , from = 0
  , to = 100
  , n = 30
  , type = "p"
  , pch = 22  # alternative pch=16
  , col = "blue"
  , bg = "blue"
  , add = TRUE
)
legend( "topleft"
  , inset = c(0,0.4), 
  , cex = 1.5, 
  , bty = "n", 
  , legend = c("A", "B"), 
  , text.col = c("red", "blue"),
  , col = c("red", "blue"), 
  , pt.bg = c("red","blue")
  , pch = c(21,22)
)

This yields a plot like the one shown by joran. Thanks a lot to both of you for your help.

  • You explicitly told the legend to fill the point symbols by setting pt.bg. – joran Apr 4 '13 at 19:25
  • Thanks joran, I didn't realize that. If I use col instead of pt.bg, then the symbols are hollow in the legend as they are in the plot. – PatrickT Apr 4 '13 at 19:41
  • Yes, see my answer, which addresses most of the issues you raise. – joran Apr 4 '13 at 19:44
  • 1
    Nice summary! Do note that the main purpose of pch 21 and 22 is the ability to set different colors for the outline and fill of each point. When you want an individual point to only have one color it's easier to use pch 15 and 16. When using 15 and 16 you don't have to worry about bg and pt.bg at all. – Gregor Apr 4 '13 at 20:50
  • Thanks shujaa. I had misunderstood this. I understand now that I was looking for a SOLID symbol rather than a FILLED symbol. Filled symbols aren't automatically filled with the symbol's color. So yes thumbs up for pch=15,16. Joran had hinted at that in his answer, but I hadn't understood the first time around. – PatrickT Apr 5 '13 at 17:46
8

I think maybe you'd have better luck using curve:

curve(x^(2) / 2,from = 0,to = 100,col = 'red',type = 'p',pch = 16,n = 20)
curve((1-x^(2))/2 + 5000,from = 0,to = 100,col = 'blue',type = 'p',pch = 15,add = TRUE,n = 20)
legend("topleft", 
        inset = c(0,0.4), 
        cex = 1.5, 
        bty = "n", 
        legend = c("A", "B"), 
        text.col = c("red", "blue"),
        col = c("red", "blue"), 
        pch = c(16,15))

enter image description here

Note that I had to tweak your functions slightly, to get output that matched your image.

To avoid specifying color and fill separately (which in general is how things are done in R) I used some older "legacy" symbols. Using curve is often much simpler for plotting functions or expressions. It also gives you a more convenient way to specify the grid of points to evaluate on. It also has an add argument that allows you to skip the awkward par hacking you engaged in.

  • Thanks joran. Good job you noticed a problem with the functions. There is a typo in the function, it should be plot(function(x){ (100^2-x^2)/2 }, but what I don't understand is that no matter what I put in, plot(function(x){ (1-x^2)/2 } or plot(function(x){ (100^2-x^2)/2 }, I get the same plot! I – PatrickT Apr 4 '13 at 19:50
  • It is obvious that at x=0 the value of the blue curve should be 1/2 and not 5,000 !! – PatrickT Apr 4 '13 at 19:51
  • if it's not too much trouble, can you tell me what you get if you copy-paste my code above and execute it? Thanks! – PatrickT Apr 4 '13 at 19:52
  • Oh okay, wait, I guess I'm making a mess with the par(new=TRUE) statement and not printing the axes of the second plot, let me check that. – PatrickT Apr 4 '13 at 19:53
  • @PatrickT I get the correct (i.e. different) output for those two plot calls. – joran Apr 4 '13 at 19:54
7

You should add argument bg="red" or bg="blue" inside plot() to get the filled symbols with particular color.

  • Thanks Didzis. So what should I make of the claim that pch=21 and pch=22 are "FILLED"? stat.ethz.ch/R-manual/R-patched/library/graphics/html/… – PatrickT Apr 4 '13 at 19:38
  • @PatrickT in that page it is already mentioned that bg= can be used to set filling and col= determines just border of symbol – Didzis Elferts Apr 4 '13 at 19:41
  • Thanks Didzis, I guess I misunderstood the meaning of "filled" ;-) – PatrickT Apr 4 '13 at 20:04
  • Thanks again Didzis, I selected joran's answer this time because a choice had to be made and he helped me solve a "bug" I had in my use of par(new=TRUE) with axes=FALSE. Cheers Didzis. – PatrickT Apr 4 '13 at 20:24
  • I get it: SOLID is the keyword I was looking for not FILLED... – PatrickT Apr 4 '13 at 20:41

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