1

I'm trying to create a <Button/> with a png image for the background AND a background color.

The png image source may not yet be known, so I can't just put them in the template.

I've got a Style that looks like this:

<Style x:Key="MyButton" TargetType="Button">
    <Setter Property="Template">
        <Setter.Value>
            <ControlTemplate TargetType="Button">
                <Border CornerRadius="0">
                    <Image Margin="0" Source="/MyApp;component/Images/my-image.png" Stretch="None" />
                    <Border.Style>
                        <Style TargetType="{x:Type Border}">
                            <Setter Property="Background" Value="LimeGreen" />
                        </Style>
                    </Border.Style>
                </Border>
            </ControlTemplate>
        </Setter.Value>
    </Setter>
</Style>

which gives me a button with a png image on top of a solid LimeGreen background.

My MainWindow.xaml looks somewhat like this:

<Button Style="{StaticResource MyButton}" Click="btnMine_Click" /* some other props */ />

and the code behind it is like this:

private void btnMine_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    // TODO: change the image src on this button
    var myButton = sender as Button;

    // This won't work:
    // myButton.Border.Image.Source = getNewImageString();
}

How do I change the image source from /MyApp2;component/Images/my-image.png to something else?

  • p.s. manually editing a .xaml file is not programmatic, there seem to be several answers here on SO that seem to think so. :-/ – David Murdoch Apr 4 '13 at 19:14
  • do you want it exactly like that (your click handler)? And can you change the XAML at all? Making it 'all programmatic' only makes sense if you're unable to 'touch' that Style. – NSGaga Apr 4 '13 at 19:25
  • Sure, I can edit the Style, but there are just too many buttons for that to be realistic. All the buttons, however, share the same background color(s). – David Murdoch Apr 4 '13 at 19:30
  • And no, not exactly like that, its just an example. What I want to do is to take a button Object and change its background image after certain events (click, mouseenter, window resize, etc). Make sense? – David Murdoch Apr 4 '13 at 19:32
  • add click trigger event to button and change background in template <ControlTemplate.Triggers> <Trigger Property="Button.IsPressed" Value="True"> <Setter Property="Image.Source" Value=",,,"></Setter> </Trigger> </ControlTemplate.Triggers> – KF2 Apr 4 '13 at 19:32
1

Sigh, in Windows Forms it was literally one line. In WPF it looks like it will be several hundred.

That's because it was the ONLY thing you could place in a button in winforms. WPF is a true UI framework, not some random semi-deprecated dinosaur that only allows to do the default stuff (which by the way looks horrible).

Option 1: Place the Image as Button's Content:

If you just want to place an Image in the button, and nothing else, why not just do that?

        <Style TargetType="Button">
            <Setter Property="Background" Value="LimeGreen"/>
            <Setter Property="Template">
                <Setter.Value>
                    <ControlTemplate TargetType="Button">
                        <Border Background="{TemplateBinding Background}">
                            <ContentPresenter ContentSource="Content"/>
                        </Border>
                    </ControlTemplate>
                </Setter.Value>
            </Setter>
        </Style>

Then:

     <Button>
        <!-- Background not set, defaults to what's set in the Style -->
        <Image Source="./ChessPieces/BlackKnight.png"/>
    </Button>
    <Button Background="Red">
        <Image Source="./ChessPieces/BlackBishop.png"/>
    </Button>
    <Button Background="Blue">
        <Image Source="./ChessPieces/BlackPawn.png"/>
    </Button>

    <!-- WPF's idea of "Dynamic" is not the same as win(hack)forms' -->
    <Button Background="White">
        <Image Source="{Binding SomeStringPropertyDefinedInAViewModel}"/>
    </Button>

Result:

enter image description here

Option 2 (not very elegant): Use the Tag Property:

If, in addition to the Image, you want to put something else inside the Button, you can resort to a somewhat hacky approach of putting the ImageSource in the Button's Tag property.

        <Style TargetType="Button">
            <Setter Property="Background" Value="LimeGreen"/>
            <Setter Property="Template">
                <Setter.Value>
                    <ControlTemplate TargetType="Button">
                        <Border Background="{TemplateBinding Background}">
                            <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
                                <Image Source="{Binding Tag, RelativeSource={RelativeSource TemplatedParent}}"
                                       Height="50" Width="50"/>
                                <ContentPresenter ContentSource="Content"/>
                            </StackPanel>
                        </Border>
                    </ControlTemplate>
                </Setter.Value>
            </Setter>
        </Style>

Then:

    <Button Tag="./ChessPieces/BlackKnight.png"
            Background="Blue"
            Foreground="White"
            Content="Some Text"/>

    <Button Tag="./ChessPieces/BlackBishop.png"
            Background="LightGray">
        <CheckBox Content="A CheckBox!" VerticalAlignment="Center"/>
    </Button>

Result:

enter image description here

Option 3: Use an Attached Property

Same as option 2, but using a property declared elsewhere, for example:

 <Button ButtonImage.Source="./ChessPieces/BlackBishop.png"
         <!-- etc -->

Option 4: Create a Custom Control:

Create a class (.cs file with no XAML) derived from Button and add a DependencyProperty to hold the image, then set the template to that and use that value.

Option 5: MVVM

Create a ButtonViewModel, or actually use a DelegateCommand declared in the ViewModel to bind the Button's properties.

Not an Option: Traverse the Visual Tree and change the Image.Source in code.

That's not something you will want to do. It's not a good approach at all.

I could go on forever, but I have to go to sleep. If you want me to elaborate on any of these approaches just let me know.

  • I went with something similar to "Option 1: Place the Image as Button's Content". Thanks! – David Murdoch Apr 6 '13 at 16:36
  • I didn't use a button though; I couldn't figure out how to style a button's hover and pressed states. – David Murdoch Apr 6 '13 at 16:43
0

A few ways spring to mind:

  1. Access the style at runtime and traverse it to find the image
  2. Give the image a name and reference that at runtime and just change the source

The best solution I believe is to create a usercontrol and have the image source as a dependency property see: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/224230/Exploring-the-use-of-Dependency-Properties-in-User

That way you'll have a ready-to-use "custom" control that supports what you're after and allows you to just reference it directly and use bindings, that way you avoid the messy solutions from using a style.


After discussion and expansion on requirements, please see:

How can I access ResourceDictionary in wpf from C# code?

  • Access the style at runtime and traverse it to find the image that is essentially what I want to do, but I can't figure out how. – David Murdoch Apr 4 '13 at 19:21
  • @DavidMurdoch where is the style defined? That will completely influence how you access it at runtime, traversal would be trickier than simply creating a usercontrol. – Clint Apr 4 '13 at 19:29
  • It's in a file named "Templates.xaml" (a ResourceDictionary), which is referenced in my App.xaml. – David Murdoch Apr 4 '13 at 19:33
  • I may have misunderstood you, I don't think I want to access the Style itself, because it will be applied to many buttons. I just want to override the style's "properties" (or whatever they'd be called in xaml) on specific buttons. – David Murdoch Apr 4 '13 at 19:35
  • @DavidMurdoch this isn't possible afaik, the only way of having button-specific overrides would be by using a UserControl. – Clint Apr 4 '13 at 19:35

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