1

I have a class like the following:

class Positive(object):
    def __init__(self, item):
        self._validate_item(item)
        self.item = item

    def _validate_item(self, item):
        if item <= 0:
            raise ValueError("item should be positive.")

I'd like to write a unit test for _validate_item(), like the following:

class PositiveTests(unittest.TestCase):
    def test_validate_item_error(self):
        self.assertRaises(
            ValueError,
            Positive._validate_item,
            0
        )

Unfortunately, this won't work because the unit test only passes 0 to the method, instead of a class instance (for the self parameter) and the 0. Is there any solution to this other than having to test this validation method indirectly via the __init__() of the class?

3 Answers 3

7

If you're not using self in the method's body, it's a hint that it might not need to be a class member. You can either move the _validate_item function into module scope:

def _validate_item(item):
    if item <= 0:
        raise ValueError("item should be positive.")

Or if it really has to stay in the class, the mark the method static:

class Positive(object):
    def __init__(self, item):
        self._validate_item(item)
        self.item = item

    @staticmethod
    def _validate_item(item):
        if item <= 0:
            raise ValueError("item should be positive.")

Your test should then work as written.

3
  • I like this answer. If you feel the need to write tests for _validate_item() on its own, chances are it actually belongs on its own.
    – Mike Mazur
    Oct 18, 2009 at 8:25
  • staticmethods are mostly pointless in Python, in that case use a classmethod! Oct 19, 2009 at 8:45
  • I wouldn't use the @classmethod decorator here for the same reason I wouldn't define it as an instance method. There's no use of cls. Given my druthers, I'd make it a private function at module scope. Oct 19, 2009 at 15:39
1

You're not creating an instance of Positive. How about

Positive()._validate_item, 0
3
  • This code raises a TypeError because Positive.__init__() is missing the item argument.
    – Mike Mazur
    Oct 18, 2009 at 8:28
  • This shows you you are trying to test the implementation "_validate_item", not the interface. I think testing Positive(0) is much better than testing _validate_item(0). Oct 24, 2009 at 11:14
  • Above comment is to @gotgenes Oct 24, 2009 at 11:15
1

Well, _validate_item() is tested through the constructor. Invoking it with a null or negative value will raise the ValueError exception.

Taking a step back, that's the goal no ? The "requirement" is that object shall not be created with a zero or negative value.

Now this is a contrived example, so the above could not be applicable to the real class ; another possibility, to really have a test dedicated to the _validate_item() method, could be to create an object with a positive value, and then to invoke the validate_item() on it.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.