Is there a way to get the idle time of the machine, as in the amount of time the machine has not been used for, in minutes/hours using Powershell or a batch file?

  • Define "not been used for" more precisely. As in since it was logged out? How long the screen saver was on? What exactly? – Austin T French Apr 6 '13 at 3:21
  • 1
    I can't seem to do anything right on this site... As it happens, the answer below was exactly what I was looking for - the idle time from the point the user stopped moving the mouse or pressing buttons on the keyboard. – StrattonL Apr 6 '13 at 14:17
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    Not sure why someone down voted you, perhaps the question was a bit vague, or doesn't show if you've tried anything... Be sure to check out how to ask – Andy Arismendi Apr 6 '13 at 22:11
up vote 18 down vote accepted

Here's a PowerShell solution that uses the Win32 API GetLastInputInfo.

Add-Type @'
using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

namespace PInvoke.Win32 {

    public static class UserInput {

        [DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError=false)]
        private static extern bool GetLastInputInfo(ref LASTINPUTINFO plii);

        [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
        private struct LASTINPUTINFO {
            public uint cbSize;
            public int dwTime;
        }

        public static DateTime LastInput {
            get {
                DateTime bootTime = DateTime.UtcNow.AddMilliseconds(-Environment.TickCount);
                DateTime lastInput = bootTime.AddMilliseconds(LastInputTicks);
                return lastInput;
            }
        }

        public static TimeSpan IdleTime {
            get {
                return DateTime.UtcNow.Subtract(LastInput);
            }
        }

        public static int LastInputTicks {
            get {
                LASTINPUTINFO lii = new LASTINPUTINFO();
                lii.cbSize = (uint)Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(LASTINPUTINFO));
                GetLastInputInfo(ref lii);
                return lii.dwTime;
            }
        }
    }
}
'@

And an example usage:

for ( $i = 0; $i -lt 10; $i++ ) {
    Write-Host ("Last input " + [PInvoke.Win32.UserInput]::LastInput)
    Write-Host ("Idle for " + [PInvoke.Win32.UserInput]::IdleTime)
    Start-Sleep -Seconds (Get-Random -Minimum 1 -Maximum 5)
}
  • Thanks a lot! Exactly what I'm looking for. How can I format the output so that it's a but more readable - i.e. 4 hours, 15 minutes, 21 seconds? Thanks again! – StrattonL Apr 6 '13 at 14:16
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    Use date formatting – Andy Arismendi Apr 6 '13 at 19:03
  • 1
    I updated the example to show off more of it's capabilities. – Andy Arismendi Apr 6 '13 at 21:02
  • Here is a nice implementation for locking the computer after some idle time: gist.github.com/wendelb/1c364bb1a36ca5916ca4 – PyWebDesign Nov 7 '16 at 14:48
  • This doesn't seem to work on a remote machine; I think it only gives the idle time for the current user session. – BrainSlugs83 May 12 '17 at 20:24
$Last = [PInvoke.Win32.UserInput]::LastInput
$Idle = [PInvoke.Win32.UserInput]::IdleTime
$LastStr = $Last.ToLocalTime().ToString("MM/dd/yyyy hh:mm tt")
Write-Host ("Last user keyboard/mouse input: " + $LastStr)
Write-Host ("Idle for " + $Idle.Days + " days, " + $Idle.Hours + " hours, " + $Idle.Minutes + " minutes, " + $Idle.Seconds + " seconds.")

Try this - although running remotely it may be running on a different session and therefore a different idle time?

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