-1
> length(row)
[1] 1000
> object.size(row)
8024 bytes
> object.size(row[1])
32 bytes

Here row is a list. Above length of the row is 1000 and size of one of its element 32 bytes. Hence total size of the list should be 32*1000 bytes but its 8024 for some reason. What could be reason of this ?

1
  • 1
    Is row really a list? How did you create it? If you showed us that this would make a better question.
    – Spacedman
    Apr 6, 2013 at 8:25

3 Answers 3

5

Initial overhead:

> row = runif(1000)
> object.size(row[1])
32 bytes
> object.size(row[1:2])
40 bytes
> object.size(row[1:3])
56 bytes
> object.size(row[1:4])
56 bytes

32 bytes for a length-1 vector plus 8 bytes for each further element. There's some other allocation funnies going on at the low end where it sometimes grabs 16 bytes, but it averages out at 8.

The extra bytes at the start are because R has to keep the length and other attributes somewhere.

require(plyr)
size = ldply(1:200,function(i){object.size(row[1:i])})$V1
plot(1:200,size,type="l")
2
  • 1
    This answer simply increases the questions. Doesnt answers anything. Apr 6, 2013 at 11:04
  • No it doesn't. It explains your observed behaviour completely. A vector of length N in R needs 24+8N bytes, not 32N bytes. You didn't give us a way to duplicate your "row" object, which issue real extra question.
    – Spacedman
    Apr 6, 2013 at 18:25
3

Here's a list of length 1000

> lst = vector("list", 1000)
> object.size(lst)
8040 bytes

it consists of a list, list(), elements of the list lst[[1]] and pointers to each list element.

> object.size(list())
40 bytes
> object.size(row[[1]])
0 bytes
> object.size(lst[1]) - object.size(list())
8 bytes
> object.size(lst[1:2]) - object.size(list())
16 bytes

The overall list structure takes 40 bytes. Each element is 0 bytes. Each pointer is 8 bytes. So 40 + 1000 * 0 + 1000 * 8 = 8040 bytes.

This provides a sense of what a list is:

> .Internal(inspect(list()))
@586b6690 19 VECSXP g0c0 [] (len=0, tl=0)

a location in memory pointing to a structure with a particular type (VECSXP) that has a particular status related to memory management g0c0 as well as attributes about its length, etc; this structure apparently takes up 40 bytes. A list is recursive, in that it contains objects that each have a data structure analogous to a list

> .Internal(inspect(list(1)))
@585b35d8 19 VECSXP g0c1 [] (len=1, tl=0)
  @585b3578 14 REALSXP g0c1 [] (len=1, tl=0) 1
> .Internal(inspect(list(1:3)))
@5872ca98 19 VECSXP g0c1 [] (len=1, tl=0)
  @584fc9b8 13 INTSXP g0c2 [] (len=3, tl=0) 1,2,3
> .Internal(inspect(list(1, 2)))
@584fc980 19 VECSXP g0c2 [] (len=2, tl=0)
  @5872c918 14 REALSXP g0c1 [] (len=1, tl=0) 1
  @5872c8e8 14 REALSXP g0c1 [] (len=1, tl=0) 2

Actually, NULL is represented by an object and does take up memory.

> .Internal(inspect(NULL))
@1169b08 00 NILSXP g0c0 [NAM(2)] 

There is only one NULL object in an R session, and object.size does not attribute it to the list.

I don't know what your row really is, or whether you're on a 32 or 64 bit operating system, or what version of R you are using. I have

> sessionInfo()
R version 3.0.0 Patched (2013-04-03 r62485)
Platform: x86_64-unknown-linux-gnu (64-bit)
1

List can have elements of variable length. Only data Frames will have rows of equal length.

l<-list(c(1,2), "klklkl", 3:10)
l<-list(c(1,2), "klklkl", 3:10)
object.size(l)  ---200 bytes
object.size(l[1]) --71 bytes
1
  • I want to know what is happening in the background. Apr 6, 2013 at 11:06

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