4

I currently use a mysql statement like the one below to search post titles.

select * from table where title like %search_term%

But problem is, if the title were like: Acme launches 5 pound burger and a user searched for Acme, it'll return a result. But if a user searched for Acme burger or Acme 5 pound, it'll return nothing.

Is there a way to get it to return results when a users searches for more than one word? Is LIKE the correct thing to use here or is there something else that can be used?

1
  • 3
    How about matching against a full text index?
    – Strawberry
    Commented Apr 7, 2013 at 7:30

5 Answers 5

5

You could use a REGEXP to match any of the words in your search string:

select *
from tbl
where
  title REGEXP CONCAT('[[:<:]](', REPLACE('Acme burger', ' ', '|'), ')[[:>:]]')

Please notice that this will not be very efficient. See fiddle here.

If you need to match every word in your string, you could use a query like this:

select *
from tbl
where
  title REGEXP CONCAT('[[:<:]]', REPLACE('Acme burger', ' ', '[[:>:]].*[[:<:]]'), '[[:>:]]')

Fiddle here. But words have to be in the correct order (es. 'Acme burger' will match, 'burger Acme' won't). There's a REGEXP to match every word in any order, but it is not supported by MySql, unless you install an UDF that supports Perl regexp.

2
  • This too returns every title with the word acme in it when you search for acme burgers.
    – Norman
    Commented Apr 7, 2013 at 9:00
  • @Norman updated my answer. But if you need to match every word, in any order, there's a regexp but it is not natively supported by MySql...so another solution is needed
    – fthiella
    Commented Apr 7, 2013 at 9:15
5

To search for a string against a text collection use MATCH() and AGAINST()

SELECT * FROM table WHERE MATCH(title) AGAINST('+Acme burger*')

or why not RLIKE

SELECT * FROM table WHERE TITLE RLIKE 'Acme|burger'

or LIKE searching an array, to have a compilation of $keys

$keys=array('Acme','burger','pound');
$mysql = array('0');
foreach($keys as $key){
    $mysql[] = 'title LIKE %'.$key.'%'
}
SELECT * FROM table WHERE '.implode(" OR ", $mysql)
3
  • you will need a full text index though.
    – nl-x
    Commented Apr 7, 2013 at 7:40
  • @nl-x What do you mean by full text index? The column type should be text? Right now its varchar.
    – Norman
    Commented Apr 7, 2013 at 8:01
  • I tried your MATCH solution. But that'll return everything with the word acme even when 'acme burger' is searched for. But that match is a good one.
    – Norman
    Commented Apr 7, 2013 at 8:38
0

What you need to do is construct a SQL such that, for example:

select * from table where title like "%Acme%" and title like "%burger%"

In short: split the string and create one like for each part. It might also work with replacing spaces with %, but I'm not sure about that.

0

The best thing is thing use perform union operation by splitting your search string based on whitespaces,

FOR Acme 5 pound,

SELECT * FROM TABLE WHERE TITLE LIKE '%ACME 5 POUND%'
UNION
SELECT * FROM TABLE WHERE TITLE LIKE '%ACME%'
UNION
SELECT * FROM TABLE WHERE TITLE LIKE '%5%'
UNION
SELECT * FROM TABLE WHERE TITLE LIKE '%POUND%'

Find out a way to give the first query a priority. Or pass the above one as four separate queries with some priority. I think you are using front end tp pass query to data bases, so it should be easy for you.

2
  • 1
    Why not use OR instead of UNION?
    – Stasel
    Commented Apr 7, 2013 at 7:41
  • yeah you can do that. But I don't know which one will be efficient.
    – Santhosh
    Commented Apr 7, 2013 at 7:43
0
<?php
$search_term = 'test1 test2 test3';
$keywords = explode(" ", preg_replace("/\s+/", " ", $search_term));
foreach($keywords as $keyword){
 $wherelike[] = "title LIKE '%$keyword%' ";
}
$where = implode(" and ", $wherelike);

$query = "select * from table where $where";

echo $query;
//select * from table where title LIKE '%test1%' and title LIKE '%test2%' and title LIKE '%test3%' 
1
  • Is there a way to do this in MySQL? Commented Jul 20, 2016 at 6:33

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