18

I have a counter declared as: main_dict = Counter() and values are added as main_dict[word] += 1. In the end I want to remove all the elements less than 15 in frequency. Is there any function in Counters to do this.

Any help appreciated.

20

No, you'll need to remove them manually. Using itertools.dropwhile() makes that a little easier perhaps:

from itertools import dropwhile

for key, count in dropwhile(lambda key_count: key_count[1] >= 15, main_dict.most_common()):
    del main_dict[key]

Demonstration:

>>> main_dict
Counter({'baz': 20, 'bar': 15, 'foo': 10})
>>> for key, count in dropwhile(lambda key_count: key_count[1] >= 15, main_dict.most_common()):
...     del main_dict[key]
... 
>>> main_dict
Counter({'baz': 20, 'bar': 15})

By using dropwhile you only need to test the keys for which the count is 15 or over; after that it'll forgo testing and just pass through everything. That works great with the sorted most_common() list. If there are a lot of values below 15, that saves execution time for all those tests.

  • I don't see the point in dropwhile for this case – jamylak Apr 7 '13 at 11:53
  • 1
    Also 'bar' shouldn't be deleted since its frequency is not less than 15. Actually this idea may work in a different way, but not really for deleting keys. eg. new_dict = dict(takewhile(lambda x: x[1] >= 15, main_dict.most_common())) – jamylak Apr 7 '13 at 12:00
  • @jamylak: dropwhile stops testing once it stops matching; for a large number of keys that makes a difference. I'll investigate the error later. – Martijn Pieters Apr 7 '13 at 12:02
  • @MartijnPieters But that doesn't matter since you are already storing the whole .most_common() list into memory first – jamylak Apr 7 '13 at 12:03
  • @jamylak: you have to at least store all the keys in memory, since we are altering the dictionary. Fixed the error. – Martijn Pieters Apr 7 '13 at 12:06
9

Another method:

c = Counter({'baz': 20, 'bar': 15, 'foo': 10})
print Counter(el for el in c.elements() if c[el] >= 15)
# Counter({'baz': 20, 'bar': 15})
  • Why .elements() over .items(), the latter would be faster – jamylak Apr 7 '13 at 12:22
  • @jamylak Because .items returns a tuple and when passed back to Counter ends up with a tuple of the key/value pairs with a value of 1 (I think - blame late night and pub lunch) – Jon Clements Apr 7 '13 at 15:04
  • 3
    Alright, or you could also do this: Counter({k: c for k, c in c.items() if c >= 15}) – jamylak Apr 8 '13 at 0:13
9
>>> main_dict = Counter({'apple': 20, 'orange': 14, 'mango': 26, 'banana': 12})
>>> for k in main_dict:
        if main_dict[k] < 15:
            del main_dict[k]


>>> main_dict
Counter({'mango': 26, 'apple': 20})
3

may I suggest another solution

from collections import Counter
main_dict = Counter({'baz': 20, 'bar': 15, 'foo': 10})  
trsh = 15

main_dict = Counter(dict(filter(lambda x: x[1] >= trsh, main_dict.items())))
print(main_dict)

>>> Counter({'baz': 20, 'bar': 15})

Also I have the same problem, but I need to return a list of all keys from Counter with values more than some threshold. To do this

keys_list = map(lambda x: x[0], filter(lambda x: x[1] >= trsh, main_dict.items()))
print(keys_list) 

>>> ['baz', 'bar']
0

An elegant solution when the threshold is zero:

main_dict += Counter()
0

An example of how to filter items whoso count greater than or less than a threshold in counter

from collections import Counter
from itertools import takewhile, dropwhile


data = (
    "Here's a little song about Roy G. Biv. "
    "He makes up all the colors that you see where you live. "
    "If you know all the colors, sing them with me: "
    "red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet all that you see."
)

c = Counter(data)

more_than_10 = dict(takewhile(lambda i: i[1] > 10, c.most_common()))
less_than_2 = dict(dropwhile(lambda i: i[1] >= 2, c.most_common()))

print(f"> 10 {more_than_10} \n2 < {less_than_2}")

Output:

> 10 {' ': 40, 'e': 23, 'o': 16, 'l': 15, 't': 12} 
2 < {"'": 1, 'R': 1, 'G': 1, 'B': 1, 'p': 1, 'I': 1, 'f': 1, ':': 1}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.