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This question has been asked previously but not recently and not with a clear answer.

Using Socket.io, is there a maximum number of concurrent connections that one can maintain before you need to add another server?

Does anyone know of any active production environments that are using websockets (particularly socket.io) on a massive scale? I'd really like to know what sort of setup is best for maximum connections?

Because Websockets are built on top of TCP, my understanding is that unless ports are shared between connections you are going to be bound by the 64K port limit. But I've also seen reports of 512K connections using Gretty. So I don't know.

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    Trello use sockets on a massive scale (specifically, socket.io).
    – James
    Jul 25, 2014 at 10:11
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    How old is that article though? Trello has just recently reached over 1 million active users per month so I would imagine they are now running more than 10,000 active sockets. Trello use Redis to sit on top of socket.io for scalability
    – James
    Jul 27, 2014 at 7:52
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    Trello now apparently has over 4 million users, but surely they are running that on a large number of servers, right? That brings me back to my original question: what's their (or anyone else's) actual peak concurrent user count per server? It would also be good to know what kind of server/container they use. And are they still running their own fork, or are they back to the origin/master? My only purpose in asking this question was in trying to gauge if my company (at the time) could afford to maintain a Socket.io application for probably 120,000 concurrent connections.
    – Andrew
    Jul 27, 2014 at 14:13
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    Regarding the port limit, I think the explanation for why that is not an issue is explained here. Basically, the only port used on your system is the one on which you are listening. Sockets are created for each connection, and those use file descriptors, but they don't use ports on your box.
    – Paul Lynch
    Nov 6, 2014 at 18:45
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    Please don't use @MajidJafari answer in RHEL or CENTOS. You won't be able to sudo due to corrupt /etc/sysctl.conf. Meaning you will be locked out of your EC2 instance or PC. I had to detach volume, mount a backup volume as root volume and edit the /etc/sysctl.conf and /etc/security/limits.conf. Please use his answer if you know what you are doing.
    – frank
    Feb 14, 2021 at 10:24

6 Answers 6

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This article may help you along the way: http://drewww.github.io/socket.io-benchmarking/

I wondered the same question, so I ended up writing a small test (using XHR-polling) to see when the connections started to fail (or fall behind). I found (in my case) that the sockets started acting up at around 1400-1800 concurrent connections.

This is a short gist I made, similar to the test I used: https://gist.github.com/jmyrland/5535279

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    I realize this is an older topic but I found it first when searching for a question to my answer and ultimately discovered this to be helpful: rtcamp.com/tutorials/linux/increase-open-files-limit The open file limit per process may default to a soft limit of 1024 and hard limit of 4096 and since every open TCP port represents a file, it's important to consider these limits when determining how many open sockets a machine will allow before trying to max out the library.
    – DeeperID
    Feb 27, 2015 at 20:47
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    @JAM Did you ever discover why your web sockets were acting up around 1400-1800 connections? I am having the identical issue, and my file limits are set to 100,000, so I know that is not the issue. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
    – Seth
    Oct 1, 2015 at 14:11
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    @seth: it has been a while since I last reviewed this, but I think this was the conclution: XHR polling took up too much resources (in relation to other transport methods). When using websockets, the number of concurrent connections was higher.
    – JAM
    Oct 1, 2015 at 15:02
  • @JAM thank you for the answer. I am seeing the same issues using the ws module, not socket.io, so there shouldn't be any XHR polling with the ws module. That is where I'm having problems troubleshooting. The search continues.
    – Seth
    Oct 5, 2015 at 14:49
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    This is a good clean answer.. Also correct as it is case by case.. Personally i suggest ppl write their own benchmarks or connection simulator. While a test for someone else might be good, it does not represent the real world environment... Once you have a client simulator capable of handling any number of clients with various real world faults.. You can bench mark after major changes and also update your simulator as you go. Operating a user chat interface would be different to monitor users browser and so on.. Python i found very handy to script a simulator...
    – Angry 84
    Nov 27, 2015 at 7:31
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I tried to use socket.io on AWS, I can at most keep around 600 connections stable.

And I found out it is because socket.io used long polling first and upgraded to websocket later.

after I set the config to use websocket only, I can keep around 9000 connections.

Set this config at client side:

const socket = require('socket.io-client')
const conn = socket(host, { upgrade: false, transports: ['websocket'] })
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    did you use EC2, which kind of instance ? t2.micro, t2.nano ?
    – bvdb
    Nov 19, 2019 at 15:46
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    Did you notice a difference in responsiveness when you force websockets?
    – Lauren
    Dec 14, 2019 at 20:33
  • Do you know what size your instance was? Also just so anyone in the future knows some old browsers don't support WebSockets which is why the upgrade may be important for some. May 21, 2020 at 18:50
  • How can we test the how much connection does the server support? How did you measure it 9000 connections? Please suggest.. Jun 26, 2020 at 15:02
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    This thread is old, but did anyone figure out what kind of EC2 instance to use? I am trying to figure out what instance to choose for: 50, 100, 200, and 300 concurrent connections. Hopefully, somebody will answer.
    – Rookie
    Apr 28, 2021 at 10:46
20

GO THROUGH THE COMMENT OF THIS ANSWER BEFORE PROCEEDING FURTHER

The question ask about socket.io sockets, the answer is for native sockets. These changes are dangerous as they apply to everything on the system, not just socket.io sockets. Besides, today networks is never the bottleneck for socket.io. Do not make these changes to your system without understanding the implications first.

For +300k concurrent connection:

Set these variables in /etc/sysctl.conf:

fs.file-max = 10000000 
fs.nr_open = 10000000

Also, change these variables in /etc/security/limits.conf:

* soft nofile 10000000
* hard nofile 10000000
root soft nofile 10000000
root hard nofile 10000000

And finally, increase TCP buffers in /etc/sysctl.conf, too:

net.ipv4.tcp_mem = 786432 1697152 1945728
net.ipv4.tcp_rmem = 4096 4096 16777216
net.ipv4.tcp_wmem = 4096 4096 16777216

for more information please refer to this.

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    Can you edit your answer and shortly explain what is going on here?
    – Esqarrouth
    Feb 9, 2021 at 8:48
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    I can't attest to this personally, but according to a comment by @frank above: "Please don't use (this) answer in RHEL or CENTOS. You won't be able to sudo due to corrupt /etc/sysctl.conf. Meaning you will be locked out of your EC2 instance or PC. I had to detach volume, mount a backup volume as root volume and edit the /etc/sysctl.conf and /etc/security/limits.conf. Please use his answer if you know what you are doing."
    – Andrew
    Feb 15, 2021 at 6:51
  • 7
    The question ask about socket.io sockets, the answer is for native sockets. These changes are dangerous as they apply to everything on the system, not just socket.io sockets. Besides, today networks is never the bottleneck for socket.io. Do not make these changes to your system without understanding the implications first.
    – Xeos
    Apr 14, 2021 at 3:30
  • use sysctl to modify settings, and run a check first before doing any changes and see if you don't already have that set to some higher value. also nr_open have a hardcoded kernel limit of 1024*1024 so increasing it over it will either have no effect or you will get an error.
    – venimus
    Feb 16, 2023 at 14:06
18

This guy appears to have succeeded in having over 1 million concurrent connections on a single Node.js server.

http://blog.caustik.com/2012/08/19/node-js-w1m-concurrent-connections/

It's not clear to me exactly how many ports he was using though.

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    Not with socket.io I think and not even with websockets. The guy seemed to be using long polling which I guess is less resource hungry.
    – Tim 333
    Nov 14, 2015 at 21:28
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I would like to provide yet another answer in 2023.

We only use websocket in socket.io-client. We have done 2 type of performance tests,

  1. my test team uses JMeter to test up to 5000 concurrent connections. Due to the nature of our product, 5000 connections is enough for us, so we didn't go higher.

  2. I use https://a.testable.io/ to do another performance test. The reason I uses testable (this is NOT a sales pitch for them lol) I can choose ws clients from different locations, e.g. I chose 3 different locations from NA and one location from Asia. I believe this would be more closer to real life scenario than I just run a test script from my local machine(which I do have too). Doing this kind of test caused money, to quote from their technical support words after I did my test, "I see you ran a 20,000 user test successfully today too, great! Less than $20 for a test of this size is by far the best pricing out there :)."

BTW, you can also refer to https://ably.com/topic/scaling-socketio, which the latest published article about socket.io performance I can find.

So in summary I would argue that if you only use websocket, 5000 to 10,000 concurrent connection should not be to hard to achieve.

2

After making configurations, you can check by writing this command on terminal

sysctl -a | grep file

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