182
public void onClick(View v) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        switch(v.getId()){
        case R.id.rollDice:
            Random ranNum = new Random();
            int number = ranNum.nextInt(6) + 1;
            diceNum.setText(""+number);
            sum = sum + number;
            for(i=0;i<8;i++){
                for(j=0;j<8;j++){

                    int value =(Integer)buttons[i][j].getTag();
                    if(value==sum){
                        inew=i;
                        jnew=j;

                        buttons[inew][jnew].setBackgroundColor(Color.BLACK);
                                                //I want to insert a delay here
                        buttons[inew][jnew].setBackgroundColor(Color.WHITE);
                         break;                     
                    }
                }
            }


            break;

        }
    }

I want to set a delay between the command between changing background. I tried using a thread timer and tried using run and catch. But it isn't working. I tried this

 Thread timer = new Thread() {
            public void run(){
                try {
                                buttons[inew][jnew].setBackgroundColor(Color.BLACK);
                    sleep(5000);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }

             }
           };
    timer.start();
   buttons[inew][jnew].setBackgroundColor(Color.WHITE);

But it is only getting changed to black.

556

Try this code:

import android.os.Handler;
...
final Handler handler = new Handler();
handler.postDelayed(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        // Do something after 5s = 5000ms
        buttons[inew][jnew].setBackgroundColor(Color.BLACK);
    }
}, 5000);
7
  • 1
    This solution explained all the questions that I had with handlers at some lines of code.
    – Sierisimo
    May 19 '15 at 17:55
  • 64
    I always come back to this post because I am too lazy to write it every time. Thank you.
    – Eugene H
    Jan 6 '16 at 18:54
  • well it llok nice but i have lots of message to wait then show. so multible treads give problem. how can solve multiple treads problem
    – mehmet
    Dec 22 '16 at 8:41
  • 2
    This solution produces a memory leak because it uses a non-static inner and anonymous class which implicitly holds a reference to its outer class, the activity. See stackoverflow.com/questions/1520887/… for a better solution.
    – tronman
    Aug 25 '17 at 15:03
  • @EugeneH Use Live Templates for easier life stackoverflow.com/a/16870791/4565796 Aug 31 '19 at 7:09
42

You can use CountDownTimer which is much more efficient than any other solution posted. You can also produce regular notifications on intervals along the way using its onTick(long) method

Have a look at this example showing a 30seconds countdown

   new CountDownTimer(30000, 1000) {
         public void onFinish() {
             // When timer is finished 
             // Execute your code here
     }

     public void onTick(long millisUntilFinished) {
              // millisUntilFinished    The amount of time until finished.
     }
   }.start();
0
23

If you use delay frequently in your app, use this utility class

import android.os.Handler;


public class Utils {

    // Delay mechanism

    public interface DelayCallback{
        void afterDelay();
    }

    public static void delay(int secs, final DelayCallback delayCallback){
        Handler handler = new Handler();
        handler.postDelayed(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                delayCallback.afterDelay();
            }
        }, secs * 1000); // afterDelay will be executed after (secs*1000) milliseconds.
    }
}

Usage:

// Call this method directly from java file

int secs = 2; // Delay in seconds

Utils.delay(secs, new Utils.DelayCallback() {
    @Override
    public void afterDelay() {
        // Do something after delay

    }
});
2
  • 1
    Why ? This is pure overhead and complexity... for nothing
    – juloo65
    Jul 8 '18 at 23:54
  • If we use frequent delays, then having a fixed format for delays is fine. I don't think there is much overhead because of one additional interface and a method.
    – aruke
    Jul 18 '18 at 1:52
21

Using the Thread.sleep(millis) method.

2
  • 34
    do not do this on the UI thread -- other elements may also stop responding and later behave unpredictably
    – jmaculate
    May 19 '14 at 18:23
  • 1
    thanks for the warning. thats exactly what I need, to delay the UI thread. perfect answer for my needs. thanks.
    – hamish
    Jun 6 '14 at 20:15
7

If you want to do something in the UI on regular time intervals very good option is to use CountDownTimer:

new CountDownTimer(30000, 1000) {

     public void onTick(long millisUntilFinished) {
         mTextField.setText("seconds remaining: " + millisUntilFinished / 1000);
     }

     public void onFinish() {
         mTextField.setText("done!");
     }
  }.start();
1
  • It's cleaner than the Handler.
    – Ahsan
    Nov 20 '18 at 6:19
4

Handler answer in Kotlin :

1 - Create a top-level function inside a file (for example a file that contains all your top-level functions) :

fun delayFunction(function: ()-> Unit, delay: Long) {
    Handler().postDelayed(function, delay)
}

2 - Then call it anywhere you needed it :

delayFunction({ myDelayedFunction() }, 300)
3

You can use this:

import java.util.Timer;

and for the delay itself, add:

 new Timer().schedule(
                    new TimerTask(){
                
                        @Override
                        public void run(){
                            
                        //if you need some code to run when the delay expires
                        }
                        
                    }, delay);

where the delay variable is in milliseconds; for example set delay to 5000 for a 5-second delay.

0

Here's an example where I change the background image from one to another with a 2 second alpha fade delay both ways - 2s fadeout of the original image into a 2s fadein into the 2nd image.

    public void fadeImageFunction(View view) {

    backgroundImage = (ImageView) findViewById(R.id.imageViewBackground);
    backgroundImage.animate().alpha(0f).setDuration(2000);

    // A new thread with a 2-second delay before changing the background image
    new Timer().schedule(
            new TimerTask(){
                @Override
                public void run(){
                    // you cannot touch the UI from another thread. This thread now calls a function on the main thread
                    changeBackgroundImage();
                }
            }, 2000);
   }

// this function runs on the main ui thread
private void changeBackgroundImage(){
    runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            backgroundImage = (ImageView) findViewById(R.id.imageViewBackground);
            backgroundImage.setImageResource(R.drawable.supes);
            backgroundImage.animate().alpha(1f).setDuration(2000);
        }
    });
}
0

I think the easiest and most stable and the most useful way as of 2020 is using delay function of Coroutines instead of Runnable. Coroutines is a good concept to handle asynchronous jobs and its delay component will be this answer's focus.

WARNING: Coroutines need Kotlin language and I didn't convert the codes to Kotlin but I think everybody can understand the main concept..

Just add the Coroutines on your build.gradle:

implementation 'org.jetbrains.kotlinx:kotlinx-coroutines-android:1.3.9'

Add a job to your class (activity, fragment or something) which you will use coroutines in it:

private var job: Job = Job()
override val coroutineContext: CoroutineContext
    get() = Dispatchers.Main + job

And you can use Coroutines anywhere on the class by using launch{ } body. So you can write your code like this:

public void onClick(View v) {

    launch {

        switch(v.getId()) {
            case R . id . rollDice :
            Random ranNum = new Random();
            int number = ranNum . nextInt (6) + 1;
            diceNum.setText("" + number);
            sum = sum + number;
            for (i= 0;i < 8;i++){
                for (j= 0;j < 8;j++){
                    int value =(Integer) buttons [i][j].getTag();
                    if (value == sum) {
                        inew = i;
                        jnew = j;

                        buttons[inew][jnew].setBackgroundColor(Color.BLACK);
                        delay(2000)
                        buttons[inew][jnew].setBackgroundColor(Color.WHITE);
                        break;
                    }
                }
        }
            break;

        }
    }
}

It's All...

Dont't forget that launch{} function is asynchronous and the for loop will not wait for delay function to finish if you write like this:

launch{
    buttons[inew][jnew].setBackgroundColor(Color.BLACK);
    delay(2000)
    buttons[inew][jnew].setBackgroundColor(Color.WHITE);
}

So, launch{ } should cover the for loop if you want all the for loop to wait for delay.

Another benefit of launch{ } is that you are making the for loop asynchronous, which means it is not gonna block the main UI thread of the application on heavy processes.

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