272

Given the following code

interface IPerson {
   firstName: string;
   lastName: string;
}

var persons: { [id: string]: IPerson; } = {
   "p1": { firstName: "F1", lastName: "L1" },
   "p2": { firstName: "F2" }
};

Why isn't the initialization rejected? After all, the second object does not have the "lastName" property.

  • 12
    Note: this has since been fixed (not sure which exact TS version). I get these errors in VS, as you would expect: Index signatures are incompatible. Type '{ firstName: string; }' is not assignable to type 'IPerson'. Property 'lastName' is missing in type '{ firstName: string; }'. – Simon_Weaver Feb 23 '15 at 20:23
  • Can you please update this post: the title doesn't align the with question and the accepted answer! – minus one Jul 3 at 6:18
312

Edit: This has since been fixed in the latest TS versions. Quoting @Simon_Weaver's comment on the OP's post:

Note: this has since been fixed (not sure which exact TS version). I get these errors in VS, as you would expect: Index signatures are incompatible. Type '{ firstName: string; }' is not assignable to type 'IPerson'. Property 'lastName' is missing in type '{ firstName: string; }'.


Apparently this doesn't work when passing the initial data at declaration. I guess this is a bug in TypeScript, so you should raise one at the project site.

You can make use of the typed dictionary by splitting your example up in declaration and initialization, like:

var persons: { [id: string] : IPerson; } = {};
persons["p1"] = { firstName: "F1", lastName: "L1" };
persons["p2"] = { firstName: "F2" }; // will result in an error
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    Why do you need the id symbol? It seems it is unnecessary. – kiewic Mar 8 '18 at 6:04
  • 5
    Using the id symbol, you can declare what the type of the keys of the dictionary should be. With the declaration above, you couldn't do the following: persons[1] = { firstName: 'F1', lastName: 'L1' } – thomaux Mar 8 '18 at 8:09
  • 3
    Always forget this syntax for some reason! – eddiewould Jul 31 '18 at 4:04
  • 16
    the id symbol can be named anything you like and was designed that way to make it easier to read code. e.g. { [username: string] : IPerson; } – Guy Park Aug 6 '18 at 7:26
  • 1
    @Robouste I would use Lodash' findKey method or if you prefer a native solution, you could build on Object.entries. If you're interested in getting the complete list of keys, take a look at Object.keys – thomaux Aug 29 '19 at 14:36
96

For using dictionary object in typescript you can use interface as below:

interface Dictionary<T> {
    [Key: string]: T;
}

and, use this for your class property type.

export class SearchParameters {
    SearchFor: Dictionary<string> = {};
}

to use and initialize this class,

getUsers(): Observable<any> {
        var searchParams = new SearchParameters();
        searchParams.SearchFor['userId'] = '1';
        searchParams.SearchFor['userName'] = 'xyz';

        return this.http.post(searchParams, 'users/search')
            .map(res => {
                return res;
            })
            .catch(this.handleError.bind(this));
    }
| improve this answer | |
63

I agree with thomaux that the initialization type checking error is a TypeScript bug. However, I still wanted to find a way to declare and initialize a Dictionary in a single statement with correct type checking. This implementation is longer, however it adds additional functionality such as a containsKey(key: string) and remove(key: string) method. I suspect that this could be simplified once generics are available in the 0.9 release.

First we declare the base Dictionary class and Interface. The interface is required for the indexer because classes cannot implement them.

interface IDictionary {
    add(key: string, value: any): void;
    remove(key: string): void;
    containsKey(key: string): bool;
    keys(): string[];
    values(): any[];
}

class Dictionary {

    _keys: string[] = new string[];
    _values: any[] = new any[];

    constructor(init: { key: string; value: any; }[]) {

        for (var x = 0; x < init.length; x++) {
            this[init[x].key] = init[x].value;
            this._keys.push(init[x].key);
            this._values.push(init[x].value);
        }
    }

    add(key: string, value: any) {
        this[key] = value;
        this._keys.push(key);
        this._values.push(value);
    }

    remove(key: string) {
        var index = this._keys.indexOf(key, 0);
        this._keys.splice(index, 1);
        this._values.splice(index, 1);

        delete this[key];
    }

    keys(): string[] {
        return this._keys;
    }

    values(): any[] {
        return this._values;
    }

    containsKey(key: string) {
        if (typeof this[key] === "undefined") {
            return false;
        }

        return true;
    }

    toLookup(): IDictionary {
        return this;
    }
}

Now we declare the Person specific type and Dictionary/Dictionary interface. In the PersonDictionary note how we override values() and toLookup() to return the correct types.

interface IPerson {
    firstName: string;
    lastName: string;
}

interface IPersonDictionary extends IDictionary {
    [index: string]: IPerson;
    values(): IPerson[];
}

class PersonDictionary extends Dictionary {
    constructor(init: { key: string; value: IPerson; }[]) {
        super(init);
    }

    values(): IPerson[]{
        return this._values;
    }

    toLookup(): IPersonDictionary {
        return this;
    }
}

And here is a simple initialization and usage example:

var persons = new PersonDictionary([
    { key: "p1", value: { firstName: "F1", lastName: "L2" } },
    { key: "p2", value: { firstName: "F2", lastName: "L2" } },
    { key: "p3", value: { firstName: "F3", lastName: "L3" } }
]).toLookup();


alert(persons["p1"].firstName + " " + persons["p1"].lastName);
// alert: F1 L2

persons.remove("p2");

if (!persons.containsKey("p2")) {
    alert("Key no longer exists");
    // alert: Key no longer exists
}

alert(persons.keys().join(", "));
// alert: p1, p3
| improve this answer | |
  • Very helpful sample code. The "interface IDictionary" contains a small typo, as there is a reference to IPerson. – mgs Apr 9 '13 at 5:31
  • would be nice to implement element count as well – nurettin Nov 11 '14 at 18:05
  • @dmck The declaration containsKey(key: string): bool; does not work with TypeScript 1.5.0-beta. It should be changed to containsKey(key: string): boolean;. – Amarjeet Singh Jul 17 '15 at 8:10
  • 1
    why dont you delcare generic type? Dictionary<T>, then no need to create the PersonDictionary class. You declare it like this : var persons = new Dictionary<IPerson>(); – Benoit Nov 13 '15 at 5:02
  • 1
    I have used such a generic dictionary effectively. I found it here:fabiolandoni.ch/… – CAK2 Jul 11 '16 at 19:56
7

Here is a more general Dictionary implementation inspired by this from @dmck

    interface IDictionary<T> {
      add(key: string, value: T): void;
      remove(key: string): void;
      containsKey(key: string): boolean;
      keys(): string[];
      values(): T[];
    }

    class Dictionary<T> implements IDictionary<T> {

      _keys: string[] = [];
      _values: T[] = [];

      constructor(init?: { key: string; value: T; }[]) {
        if (init) {
          for (var x = 0; x < init.length; x++) {
            this[init[x].key] = init[x].value;
            this._keys.push(init[x].key);
            this._values.push(init[x].value);
          }
        }
      }

      add(key: string, value: T) {
        this[key] = value;
        this._keys.push(key);
        this._values.push(value);
      }

      remove(key: string) {
        var index = this._keys.indexOf(key, 0);
        this._keys.splice(index, 1);
        this._values.splice(index, 1);

        delete this[key];
      }

      keys(): string[] {
        return this._keys;
      }

      values(): T[] {
        return this._values;
      }

      containsKey(key: string) {
        if (typeof this[key] === "undefined") {
          return false;
        }

        return true;
      }

      toLookup(): IDictionary<T> {
        return this;
      }
    }
| improve this answer | |
6

Typescript fails in your case because it expects all the fields to be present. Use Record and Partial utility types to solve it.

Record<string, Partial<IPerson>>

interface IPerson {
   firstName: string;
   lastName: string;
}

var persons: Record<string, Partial<IPerson>> = {
   "p1": { firstName: "F1", lastName: "L1" },
   "p2": { firstName: "F2" }
};

Explanation.

  1. Record type creates a dictionary/hashmap.
  2. Partial type says some of the fields may be missing.

Alternate.

If you wish to make last name optional you can append a ? Typescript will know that it's optional.

lastName?: string;

https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/utility-types.html

| improve this answer | |
4

If you want to ignore a property, mark it as optional by adding a question mark:

interface IPerson {
    firstName: string;
    lastName?: string;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    The whole point of the question is why the given code compiled without providing a last name… – Pierre Arlaud Jun 27 '18 at 7:59

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