5

I'm working on a Windows Store App with C# and ran into something where I can't imagine it's difficult, but I can't find out how to do it.

On my MainPage.xaml I created a user control: A StackPanel with horizontal orientation, with just an Image and a TextBlock inside. Like this:

<!-- language: lang-xml -->
<StackPanel Width="300" Height="100" Orientation="Horizontal" Margin="0,0,0,20" Tapped="LoremIpsum_Tapped">
    <Image Source="/Assets/pic.jpg" Margin="20"/>
    <TextBlock FontFamily="Segoe UI" FontSize="30" VerticalAlignment="Center">
        Lorem Ipsum
    </TextBlock>
</StackPanel>

Which looks like this:

enter image description here

I use it as a custom kind of button to get to some sub-page. Now the thing is, there are no animations. I wanted to have the typical animations that ListItems have in a SplitView: shrink when pressed, grow back to normal when either released or when the pointer exits the virtual borders of the control. I couldn't find the animation declaration/definition associated with those ListItems (Common.StandardStyles.xaml Standard130ItemTemplate). But I found out (here) that there are predefined animations for that: PointerDownThemeAnimation and PointerUpThemeAnimation. But then it took me quite a while to find out how to apply them to the control. You might think the sample mentioned on this site specifically about those pointer theme animations (about C#) should help, but it leads to sample for HTML/Javascript animations. But I found solutions here, here and here.

So I needed Storyboards in the control resources, a name so the control can be targeted and event handlers in the code-behind.

Applied on my XAML it becomes this:

<!-- language: lang-xml -->
<StackPanel x:Name="LoremIpsum" Width="300" Height="100" Orientation="Horizontal" Margin="0,0,0,20" Tapped="LoremIpsum_Tapped" PointerPressed="LoremIpsum_AnimDown" PointerReleased="LoremIpsum_AnimUp" PointerExited="LoremIpsum_AnimUp">
    <Image Source="/Assets/pic.jpg" Margin="20"/>
    <TextBlock FontFamily="Segoe UI" FontSize="30" VerticalAlignment="Center">
        Lorem Ipsum
    </TextBlock>
    <StackPanel.Resources>
        <Storyboard x:Name="pointerDownStoryboard">
            <PointerDownThemeAnimation TargetName="LoremIpsum" />
        </Storyboard>
        <Storyboard x:Name="pointerUpStoryboard">
            <PointerUpThemeAnimation TargetName="LoremIpsum" />
        </Storyboard>
    </StackPanel.Resources>
</StackPanel>

Plus the additional event handlers in the code-behind:

<!-- language: lang-cs -->
private void Latest_AnimDown(object sender, PointerRoutedEventArgs e)
{
    pointerDownStoryboard.Begin();
}
private void Latest_AnimUp(object sender, PointerRoutedEventArgs e)
{
    pointerUpStoryboard.Begin();
}

This worked. But... as I have lots of those kind of user controls, I certainly don't want to add all that for every control. As mentioned before the Standard130ItemTemplate didn't help. So I thought about custom controls. I was hoping I could just define a MyStackPanel that's nothing but a StackPanel + the StoryBoards, and that the targeting to the x:Name would work and maybe I could put the event handlers in the LayoutAwarePage code-behind, so all others inherit from it.

I started looking for how to do that and found this sample of how to create custom controls: XAML user and custom controls sample.

There's the custom control in a Generic.xml:

<!-- language: lang-xml -->
xmlns:local="using:UserAndCustomControls">
<Style TargetType="local:BasicCustomControl">
    <Setter Property="Template">
        <Setter.Value>
            <ControlTemplate TargetType="local:BasicCustomControl">
                <Border
                    Background="{TemplateBinding Background}"
                    BorderBrush="{TemplateBinding BorderBrush}"
                    BorderThickness="{TemplateBinding BorderThickness}">
                </Border>
            </ControlTemplate>
        </Setter.Value>
    </Setter>
</Style>

And a code file, but not code-behind:

<!-- language: lang-cs -->
namespace UserAndCustomControls
{
    public sealed class BasicCustomControl : Control
    {
        public BasicCustomControl()
        {
            this.DefaultStyleKey = typeof(BasicCustomControl);
        }
    }
}

But the sample didn't contain anything about animations. So I played around with the example, trying to add the StoryBoards to the Border or to the ControlTemplate, adding event handlers to a self created Generic.xaml.cs code-behind. Nothing worked.

Then I found this, but wasn't sure about how and why to put an event handler into the BasicCustomControl class. I tried it anyway:

In Generic.xaml:

<!-- language: lang-xml -->
xmlns:local="using:UserAndCustomControls">
<Style TargetType="local:BasicCustomControl">
    <Setter Property="Template">
        <Setter.Value>
            <ControlTemplate TargetType="local:BasicCustomControl">
                <Border x:Name="Border"
                    Background="{TemplateBinding Background}"
                    BorderBrush="{TemplateBinding BorderBrush}"
                    BorderThickness="{TemplateBinding BorderThickness}">
                    <Border.Resources>
                        <Storyboard x:Name="pointerDownStoryboard">
                            <PointerDownThemeAnimation TargetName="Border" />
                        </Storyboard>
                        <Storyboard x:Name="pointerUpStoryboard">
                            <PointerUpThemeAnimation TargetName="Border" />
                        </Storyboard>
                    </Border.Resources>
                </Border>
            </ControlTemplate>
        </Setter.Value>
    </Setter>
</Style>

And in BasicCustomControl.cs:

<!-- language: lang-cs -->
protected override void OnPointerPressed(PointerRoutedEventArgs e)
{
    ((Storyboard)this.Resources["PointerDownThemeAnimation"]).Begin(this);
}

That didn't work. The Begin() method doesn't take arguments and without the argument the build succeeded, but I got an System.Runtime.InteropServices.COMException when clicking on the control.

Then I found this on SO: How to add XAML storyboard animation to a full blown WPF Custom Control in an XBAP?

This seems to be an interesting solution, but I don't get it. Here's also some description of VisualState stuff for custom controls, but again I don't know how to apply this to my needs: Quickstart: control templates

Now at this point I spent quite some time on this and I'm just thinking that for this simple thing - a simple, even pre-defined animation for a custom control -, there must be a simple solution. I hope I'm just overlooking something and it's not really that complicated.

To sum up the questions:

  1. Where's the animation of the Standard130ItemTemplate defined and "attached" to the template?
  2. Is there a control that I can "inherit" from that behaves the way I want (just those up/down animations on three events)?
  3. Is there a way to create that kind of control, that I can inherit from - with XAML + Code?
  4. Is there a way to do this just with XAML? Is this preferable to the former way?
  5. Is there a simple example or tutorial on this?
  6. Are there any collections of custom controls that I can download and use? I wasn't able to find any.
0

Create a custom style. In this example I bound the Image Source to the content field. So I just had to put my path to my image in that field (ex. "Assets/Image.png"). It would be nice if adding custom animations like this was easier to figure out the first time.

    <Style x:Key="ImageButtonStyle" TargetType="ButtonBase">
    <Setter Property="Template">
        <Setter.Value>
            <ControlTemplate TargetType="ButtonBase">
                <Grid x:Name="RootGrid" Background="Transparent">
                    <Image x:Name="ImageLabel" Source="{TemplateBinding Content}"/>
                    <Rectangle
                            x:Name="FocusVisualWhite"
                            IsHitTestVisible="False"
                            Stroke="{StaticResource FocusVisualWhiteStrokeThemeBrush}"
                            StrokeEndLineCap="Square"
                            StrokeDashArray="1,1"
                            Opacity="0"
                            StrokeDashOffset="1.5"/>
                    <Rectangle
                            x:Name="FocusVisualBlack"
                            IsHitTestVisible="False"
                            Stroke="{StaticResource FocusVisualBlackStrokeThemeBrush}"
                            StrokeEndLineCap="Square"
                            StrokeDashArray="1,1"
                            Opacity="0"
                            StrokeDashOffset="0.5"/>

                    <VisualStateManager.VisualStateGroups>
                        <VisualStateGroup x:Name="CommonStates">
                            <VisualState x:Name="Normal"/>
                            <VisualState x:Name="PointerOver">
                            </VisualState>
                            <VisualState x:Name="Pressed">
                                <Storyboard>
                                    <PointerDownThemeAnimation TargetName="ImageLabel" />
                                </Storyboard>
                            </VisualState>
                            <VisualState x:Name="Disabled">
                            </VisualState>
                        </VisualStateGroup>
                        <VisualStateGroup x:Name="FocusStates">
                            <VisualState x:Name="Focused">
                                <Storyboard>
                                    <DoubleAnimation
                                            Storyboard.TargetName="FocusVisualWhite"
                                            Storyboard.TargetProperty="Opacity"
                                            To="1"
                                            Duration="0"/>
                                    <DoubleAnimation
                                            Storyboard.TargetName="FocusVisualBlack"
                                            Storyboard.TargetProperty="Opacity"
                                            To="1"
                                            Duration="0"/>
                                </Storyboard>
                            </VisualState>
                            <VisualState x:Name="Unfocused" />
                            <VisualState x:Name="PointerFocused" />
                        </VisualStateGroup>
                        <VisualStateGroup x:Name="CheckStates">
                            <VisualState x:Name="Checked">
                                <Storyboard>
                                    <DoubleAnimation Duration="0" To="0" Storyboard.TargetName="OutlineGlyph" Storyboard.TargetProperty="Opacity"/>
                                    <ObjectAnimationUsingKeyFrames Storyboard.TargetName="BackgroundGlyph" Storyboard.TargetProperty="Foreground">
                                        <DiscreteObjectKeyFrame KeyTime="0" Value="{StaticResource AppBarItemForegroundThemeBrush}"/>
                                    </ObjectAnimationUsingKeyFrames>
                                    <ObjectAnimationUsingKeyFrames Storyboard.TargetName="BackgroundCheckedGlyph" Storyboard.TargetProperty="Visibility">
                                        <DiscreteObjectKeyFrame KeyTime="0" Value="Visible"/>
                                    </ObjectAnimationUsingKeyFrames>
                                    <ObjectAnimationUsingKeyFrames Storyboard.TargetName="Content" Storyboard.TargetProperty="Foreground">
                                        <DiscreteObjectKeyFrame KeyTime="0" Value="{StaticResource AppBarItemPressedForegroundThemeBrush}"/>
                                    </ObjectAnimationUsingKeyFrames>
                                </Storyboard>
                            </VisualState>
                            <VisualState x:Name="Unchecked"/>
                            <VisualState x:Name="Indeterminate"/>
                        </VisualStateGroup>
                    </VisualStateManager.VisualStateGroups>
                </Grid>
            </ControlTemplate>
        </Setter.Value>
    </Setter>
</Style>

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.