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i need to find max value for each column in every 1 min out of 12 value means logs will come every 5 sec , so every 1 min i need to find max value for each column

02 11:23:18 03 004 009 009 001 002 002 001 001 001 001 004 000 000 258 258 000 00 4/05/2013
01 11:23:22 01 001 001 001 001 001 001 002 001 001 001 004 000 000 000 000 000 00 4/05/2013
02 11:23:23 01 002 006 012 001 002 002 002 002 002 001 004 000 000 241 241 000 00 4/05/2013
01 11:23:27 01 001 002 005 004 006 001 003 001 001 001 004 000 000 000 000 000 00 4/05/2013
02 11:23:28 01 003 001 002 001 002 001 002 001 001 001 004 000 000 256 257 000 00 4/05/2013
01 11:23:32 01 001 001 001 001 001 001 002 001 001 006 009 000 000 000 000 000 00 4/05/2013
02 11:23:33 02 003 003 015 002 005 002 002 001 001 001 004 000 000 204 205 000 00 4/05/2013
01 11:23:37 02 001 001 001 001 002 001 003 001 001 001 005 000 000 000 000 000 00 4/05/2013
02 11:23:38 01 002 001 009 001 004 009 003 001 001 001 004 000 000 266 267 000 00 4/05/2013
01 11:23:42 01 001 001 000 001 001 001 002 001 001 002 011 000 000 000 000 000 00 4/05/2013
02 11:23:43 01 002 002 009 001 002 001 004 000 002 001 004 000 000 195 195 000 00 4/05/2013

need max value for column 3rd to 14th , i am new in perl so please excuse

closed as too localized by Chris Seymour, amon, Sinan Ünür, DarkAjax, robbrit Apr 9 '13 at 15:45

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  • 5
    I need coffee and a donut. use List::Util qw(max). – TLP Apr 9 '13 at 8:34
  • There appear to be 19 columns in the input. What exactly should the output look like for the given input? – Jonathan Leffler Apr 9 '13 at 12:17
  • Hmmmm...let's make that 21 columns...a lot of them, anyway. – Jonathan Leffler Apr 9 '13 at 13:07
  • 1
    min(ute) or min(imum) or min(dblowingly shortsighted)? – Perleone Apr 9 '13 at 13:50
2

This works for me:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

my @maxima;
my $prevmin = "";

sub print_maxima
{
    print "@maxima\n" if (scalar(@maxima) > 0);
    @maxima = ();
}

while (<>)
{
    my(@row) = split;
    my($hhmm) = substr $row[1], 1, 5;
    if ($hhmm ne $prevmin)
    {
        print_maxima;
        $prevmin = $hhmm;
    }
    foreach my $col (0..(scalar(@row)-1))
    {
        $maxima[$col] //= $row[$col];   # Avoid undef values
        $maxima[$col] = $row[$col] if ($row[$col] gt $maxima[$col]);
    }
}
print_maxima;

Given an extended version of your sample data, carefully crafted so that the maximum values from the second minute are always strictly one less than the value from the first minute unless the values were all zeros:

02 11:23:18 03 004 009 009 001 002 002 001 001 001 001 004 000 000 258 258 000 00 4/05/2013
01 11:23:22 01 001 001 001 001 001 001 002 001 001 001 004 000 000 000 000 000 00 4/05/2013
02 11:23:23 01 002 006 012 001 002 002 002 002 002 001 004 000 000 241 241 000 00 4/05/2013
01 11:23:27 01 001 002 005 004 006 001 003 001 001 001 004 000 000 000 000 000 00 4/05/2013
02 11:23:28 01 003 001 002 001 002 001 002 001 001 001 004 000 000 256 257 000 00 4/05/2013
01 11:23:32 01 001 001 001 001 001 001 002 001 001 006 009 000 000 000 000 000 00 4/05/2013
02 11:23:33 02 003 003 015 002 005 002 002 001 001 001 004 000 000 204 205 000 00 4/05/2013
01 11:23:37 02 001 001 001 001 002 001 003 001 001 001 005 000 000 000 000 000 00 4/05/2013
02 11:23:38 01 002 001 009 001 004 009 003 001 001 001 004 000 000 266 267 000 00 4/05/2013
01 11:23:42 01 001 001 000 001 001 001 002 001 001 002 011 000 000 000 000 000 00 4/05/2013
02 11:23:43 01 002 002 009 001 002 001 004 000 002 001 004 000 000 195 195 000 00 4/05/2013
02 11:24:18 03 003 008 009 001 002 002 001 001 001 001 004 000 000 258 258 000 00 4/05/2013
01 11:24:22 01 001 001 001 001 001 001 002 001 001 001 004 000 000 000 000 000 00 4/05/2013
01 11:24:23 01 002 006 012 001 002 002 002 001 001 001 004 000 000 241 241 000 00 4/05/2013
01 11:24:27 01 001 002 005 003 005 001 003 001 001 001 004 000 000 000 000 000 00 4/05/2013
01 11:24:28 01 003 001 002 001 002 001 002 001 001 001 004 000 000 256 257 000 00 4/05/2013
01 11:24:32 01 001 001 001 001 001 001 002 001 001 005 009 000 000 000 000 000 00 4/05/2013
02 11:24:33 02 003 003 014 002 005 002 002 001 001 001 004 000 000 204 205 000 00 4/05/2013
01 11:24:37 02 001 001 001 001 002 001 003 001 001 001 005 000 000 000 000 000 00 4/05/2013
01 11:24:38 01 002 001 009 001 004 008 003 001 001 001 004 000 000 265 266 000 00 4/05/2013
01 11:24:41 01 001 001 000 001 001 001 002 001 001 002 010 000 000 000 000 000 00 4/05/2013
01 11:24:42 01 002 002 009 001 002 001 003 000 001 001 004 000 000 195 195 000 00 4/05/2013

the output of the script is:

02 11:23:43 03 004 009 015 004 006 009 004 002 002 006 011 000 000 266 267 000 00 4/05/2013
02 11:24:42 03 003 008 014 003 005 008 003 001 001 005 010 000 000 265 266 000 00 4/05/2013

The script is a simple control-break report, based on the hh:mm portion of the second column. The maxima comparison exploits the leading zeroes on the data, using string comparison (gt) rather than numeric comparison. It scans over all the columns, so it reports the largest time within the minute in column 2.

It would get confused with the following adjacent data lines:

01 11:24:41 01 001 001 000 001 001 001 002 001 001 002 010 000 000 000 000 000 00 4/05/2013
01 11:24:42 01 002 002 009 001 002 001 003 000 001 001 004 000 000 195 195 000 00 4/06/2013

Note that the date portion changed, so the rows belong to two different days, but they'd be aggregated into the same minute because the code does not look at the date column. It also is not clear whether your date format is mm/dd/yyyy or dd/mm/yyyy; either could be valid. It's better to use yyyy-mm-dd format; it is unambiguous and sorts into date order automatically.


It's Perl — TMTOWTDI (There's More Than One Way To Do It).

The body of the foreach my $col loop could be replaced with:

$maxima[$col] = $row[$col] if (!defined $maxima[$col] || $row[$col] gt $maxima[$col]);

This avoids the need for Perl 5.10 (the //= operator was added then). I doubt if you'd be able to measure the difference in performance. The foreach control could also be a simple for (my $col = 0; $col < scalar(@row); $col++); again, there's not much to choose between the two in this case, though if the number of columns were humongous (thousands of columns), the for would use less memory than the foreach.

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