38

So I have this directive called say, mySave, it's pretty much just this

app.directive('mySave', function($http) {
   return function(scope, element, attrs) {
      element.bind("click", function() {
          $http.post('/save', scope.data).success(returnedData) {
              // callback defined on my utils service here

              // user defined callback here, from my-save-callback perhaps?
          }
      });
   }
});

the element itself looks like this

<button my-save my-save-callback="callbackFunctionInController()">save</button>

callbackFunctionInController is for now just

$scope.callbackFunctionInController = function() {
    alert("callback");
}

when I console.log() attrs.mySaveCallback inside my-save directive, it just gives me a string callbackFunctionInController(), I read somewhere that I should $parse this and it would be fine, so I tried to $parse(attrs.mySaveCallback) which gave me back some function, but hardly the one I was looking for, it gave me back

function (a,b){return m(a,b)} 

What am I doing wrong? Is this approach flawed from the beginning?

61

So what seems like the best way is using the isolated scope as suggested by ProLoser

app.directive('mySave', function($http) {
   return {
      scope: {
        callback: '&mySaveCallback'
      }
      link: function(scope, element, attrs) {
        element.on("click", function() {
            $http.post('/save', scope.$parent.data).success(returnedData) {
                // callback defined on my utils service here

                scope.callback(); // fires alert
            }
        });
      }
   }
});

For passing parameters back to controller do this

[11:28] <revolunet> you have to send named parameters 
[11:28] <revolunet> eg my-attr="callback(a, b)" 
[11:29] <revolunet> in the directive: scope.callback({a:xxx, b:yyy})
  • the question is why do you want to sent a value to the controller, you can easily create a two way binding – Arun P Johny Apr 9 '13 at 9:34
  • if you want to send values back to the controller you have to send an object with named parameters, eg: {result: returnedData} – jujule Apr 9 '13 at 9:35
  • 2
    @ArunPJohny, one reason to not use two-way binding: sometimes you don't want to add additional scope properties for values that are only needed by the callback function. – Mark Rajcok Apr 9 '13 at 17:24
  • 2
    Where is this documented? – Kugel Aug 8 '14 at 5:16
  • I still think you should be using ng-click as putting save/business logic inside your directives is bad juju – ProLoser Feb 21 '15 at 22:42
12

There are a lot of ways to go about what you're doing. The FIRST thing you should know is that the $http.post() is going to be called as soon as that DOM element is rendered out by the template engine, and that's it. If you put it inside a repeat, the call will be done for each new item in the repeater, so my guess is this is definitely not what you want. And if it is then you really aren't designing things correctly because the existence of DOM alone should not dictate queries to the backend.

Anyway, directly answering your question; if you read the albeit crappy docs on $parse, it returns you an evaluation expression. When you execute this function by passing the scope to evaluate on, the current state of that expression on the scope you passed will be returned, this means your function will be executed.

var expression = $parse(attrs.mySave);
results = expression($scope); // call on demand when needed
expression.assign($scope, 'newValu'); // the major reason to leverage $parse, setting vals

Yes, it's a little confusing at first, but you must understand that a $scope changes constantly in asynchronous apps and it's all about WHEN you want the value determined, not just how. $parse is more useful for a reference to a model that you want to be able to assign a value to, not just read from.

Of course, you may want to read up on creating an isolate scope or on how to $eval() an expression.

$scope.$eval(attrs.mySave);
  • Oups, I actually forgot to put in element.bind("click") to the post while stripping down my code of the unnecessary mess. Fixed – fxck Apr 9 '13 at 8:44
  • Alright, so I should use isolated scope in the first place. But if I, for now, still wanted to use $parse, how would I execute the function returned from $parse? I tried callback.apply();, callback.call();,callback();, where callback is $parse(attrs.mySaveCallback), none of them fired my alert(). – fxck Apr 9 '13 at 8:53
  • 2
    @foxx, use parse as follows inside your link function: var cb = $parse(attrs.mySaveCallback);, then inside your click callback: cb(scope);. Fiddle – Mark Rajcok Apr 9 '13 at 18:26
9

You can use .$eval to execute a statement in the given scope

app.directive('mySave', function($http) {
   return function(scope, element, attrs) {
      $http.post('/save', scope.data).success(returnedData) {
          // callback defined on my utils service here

          // user defined callback here, from my-save-callback perhaps?
          scope.$eval(attrs.mySaveCallback)
      }
   }
});

TD: Demo

If you want to share data between a directive and a controller you can use the two way binding

app.controller('AppController', function ($scope) {
   $scope.callbackFunctionInController = function() {
      console.log('do something')
   };

   $scope.$watch('somedata', function(data) {
      console.log('controller', data);
   }, true);
});

app.directive('mySave', function($http, $parse) {
   return {
     scope: {
       data: '=mySaveData',
       callback: '&mySaveCallback' //the callback
     },
     link: function(scope, element, attrs) {
       $http.get('data.json').success(function(data) {
         console.log('data', data);
         scope.data = data;
         scope.callback(); //calling callback, this may not be required
       });
     }
   };
});

Demo: Fiddle

  • Error: $digest already in progress – fxck Apr 9 '13 at 8:41
  • check the updated solution – Arun P Johny Apr 9 '13 at 8:44
  • That actually works, but is it the proper way of doing it, or isolated scope as suggested by @ProLoser is still the best? And how would I pass returnedData back to mySaveCallback? – fxck Apr 9 '13 at 9:01
  • @foxx, I think you first need to determine what kind of scope your directive needs. Then from there, you can determine how to pass data and callbacks to your directive. – Mark Rajcok Apr 9 '13 at 17:26
  • how will you pass parameters if you calling it the first way? i.e scope.$eval(attrs.mySaveCallback(parameters)), i tried doing this but got attrs.mySaveCallback isn't a function – lboyel Jun 18 '16 at 19:40
4
scope: {
    callback: '&mySaveCallback'
}

Setting the scope explicitly could be a good solution but if you want the reach other parts of the original scope you can't because you have just overwritten it. For some reason, I needed to reach other parts of the scope too so I used the same implementation as ng-click do.

The use of my directive in HTML:

<div my-data-table my-source="dataSource" refresh="refresh(data)">

Inside the directive (without setting the scope explicitly):

var refreshHandler = $parse(attrs.refresh);
    scope.$apply(function () {
    refreshHandler( {data : conditions}, scope, { $event: event });
});

With this I can call the function in controller and pass parameters to it.

In the controller:

$scope.refresh= function(data){
    console.log(data);
}

And it prints the conditions correctly out.

0

This worked for me

Inside the view script

<tag mycallbackattrib="scopemethod">

Inside the directive

$scope[attrs.mycallbackattrib](params....);

It is correctly called and params are passed, but maybe is not a best 'angular way' to work.

0

You should be using ng-click instead of creating your own directive.

  • Works in some simple case, not if you want to, like, disable the button and stuff, show some animation, use the same directive on multiple places etc. I don't quite remember why I wanted this though, its been a while. – fxck Dec 10 '14 at 9:22
  • You can do all of that with ng-click. It does animations, you can disable the button. Everything. There is absolutely nothing in your version that ng-click doesn't already do. – ProLoser Dec 11 '14 at 10:13
  • Not sure why I was being downvoted. It's bad practice to put business logic (such as saving) into a directive which is entirely view-related. You could have done a $scope.save() that simply does everything you want. – ProLoser Feb 21 '15 at 22:38
0
app.directive('mySave', function($http, $parse) {
   return {
     scope: {
       data: '=mySaveData',
       callback: '&' //the callback
     },
     link: function(scope, element, attrs) {
       $http.get('data.json').success(function(data) {
         console.log('data', data);
         if (scope.callback()) scope.callback().apply(data);
       });
     }
   };
});

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