15

I have a 1GB slice from slicehost and I have 4 projects running on that box. All 4 applications are ruby on rails application. I was wondering what is the best way to ensure that log files are rotated.

I would prefer to have 4 different log files one for each app rather than having one big log file for all 4 applications.

I am running ubuntu.

I am running passenger.

16

I also use logrotate (you'll have to install via apt-get). Create a new logrotate file in your /etc/logrotate.d/ directory. Here's an example of one of mine:

# for the rails logs
/home/apps/*/shared/log/*log {
  daily
  rotate 14
  notifempty
  missingok
  compress
  sharedscripts
  postrotate
    /usr/bin/touch /home/apps/application1/current/tmp/restart.txt
    /usr/bin/touch /home/apps/application2/current/tmp/restart.txt
  endscript
}
# for the apache logs
/home/apps/logs/*log {
  daily
  rotate 14
  notifempty
  missingok
  compress
  sharedscripts
  postrotate
    /etc/init.d/apache2 restart
  endscript
}

This rotates both rails production.log logs and the apache access/error logs (I run my apps under passenger).

  • Thanks for providing an example, I think that's helpful. Why do you restart your apps after rotating the logs, though? – Luke Francl Oct 20 '09 at 22:43
  • 1
    If you don't restart the app (or apache for that matter), you'll have an issue with the logs not appending anymore. I could be wrong, but I know this was an issue in the past. – Bill Turner Oct 21 '09 at 3:33
  • 1
    If you add a copytruncate option this will copy your prod.log to prod.log.0 and then will truncate prod.log, leaving the file descriptors intacted and you will not have to restart the app. Althought, the copytruncate option may lose a little bit of log data as it is rotating the files. – Kamilski81 Feb 3 '12 at 16:11
  • 1
    I posted a solution (stackoverflow.com/a/22615644/850996) that does not require restarting the app. Restarting for log rotation is an unnecessary performance hit so better to avoid that if possible. – Shyam Habarakada Mar 24 '14 at 16:54
5

I'd just use the built-in rotation offered by the rails logger:

# in config/application.rb
config.logger = Logger.new(Rails.root.join('log', "#{Rails.env}.log"), 3, 10.megabytes)

This will rotate the log files once they reach 10MB and save the 3 most recent rotated logs.

  • 2
    The only issue with using Logger rather than the default BufferedLogger, as I found out the hard way, is that if you are using multiple processes / threads in your app server (Passenger, Unicorn.. basically anything besides Webrick), the messages will interleave. – Duke Jan 3 '12 at 6:42
  • Hmm, I've been doing heavy load-testing against Passenger with several processes writing single messages across several method calls to a plain Logger with rotation parameters, and not seen any interleaving. I will keep my eye out for this now. – Gabe Kopley Jan 3 '12 at 18:04
  • While I haven't seen messages broken up and interleaved, I am seeing the logs being rotated before reaching 10M when the system is under load, and whole messages out of order. – Gabe Kopley Jan 3 '12 at 23:14
  • It required me to add require 'active_support/core_ext/numeric/bytes' before using .megabytes method – Eduardo Aug 5 '15 at 23:19
  • @GabeKopley Its been a few years since the answer above. Am wondering if you are still using this approach and if there are any issues today? – Christian Fazzini Sep 4 '16 at 20:20
3

This is meta-programming and whether it should be on ServerFault or SO is debatable.

logrotate, a standard package for a number of operating systems, and you can apt-get install logrotate to get it if you do not already. It can be coerced into rotating whatever logs you want, using whatever schedule you want, and with differing policies a la "gzip 7 days then rm" per-file.

Investigate /etc/logrotate.d.

  • 2
    FWIW, it seems like a perfectly valid programmER topic to me. I tend to think of SO as being for programmers and not just programming. – John Munsch Oct 19 '09 at 18:14
  • You tend to think against what the FAQ states, then. Point taken, though. – Jed Smith Oct 19 '09 at 19:21
2

Here's my capistrano installation procedure. I copy this into the deploy file and just run it when I create the server environment for the application, or if there are any changes to the logrotate configuration.

namespace :setup do
  task :install_logrotation, :roles => :app do
    logrotate = <<-BASH 
      #{shared_path}/log/*.log {
        daily
        missingok
        rotate 30
        compress
        size 5M
        delaycompress
        sharedscripts
        postrotate
          #{signal_unicorn("USR1")}
        endscript
      }
    BASH
    tmpfile = "/tmp/#{application}.logrotate"

    put(logrotate, tmpfile)
    run "#{sudo} chown root:root #{tmpfile} && #{sudo} mv -f #{tmpfile} /etc/logrotate.d/#{application}"
  end
end

(Oh, and signal_unicorn just does a "#{sudo} kill -s #{signal} cat #{unicorn_pid}"; USR1 tells it to reload all its files so it will append to the new log file.)

Have fun!

2

We recently had to deal with this, and realized that logrotate is not the best solution. Using it requires that you restart the rails app every time logs are rotated, which seems like an unnecessary performance hit.

A better solution is to override the default rails logger in your application's configuration file(s).

# in config/environments/development.rb
config.logger = Logger.new("#{Rails.env}.log", "daily")

and, then use a script that cleans up files older than n days. You could use logrotate for this part if you like. We use a rake task like,

desc "Cleanup application logs older than 30 days"
task :logs => :environment do
  require 'fileutils'
  Dir.glob("#{Rails.root}/log/*.log.*").
    select{|f| File.mtime(f) < (Time.now - (60*60*24*30)) }. # older than 30 days
    each { |f| 
      puts "Removing #{f}"
      FileUtils.rm f 
    }
end
  • 4
    logrotate copytruncate option allows for in-place truncation of the original log file, thereby ensuring that rails server can continue writing to the log when logs are rotated. So it is not necessary to restart rails for log rotation. – Prakash Murthy Oct 22 '14 at 0:49
  • does apachectl graceful produces still noticeable performance hit? – timurb Jan 9 '17 at 11:30
  • @Shyam Habarakada Just to confirm, this script you use for cleaning up older logs you put it inside lib/tasks, right? – ltdev Jun 30 '17 at 7:54
0

To avoid needing to restart the app, as noted above, you can use the following complete logrotate configuration:

/etc/logrotate.d/rails

<path_to_rails_app>/log/*.log {
  daily
  size 100M
  missingok
  notifempty
  rotate 4
  compress
  delaycompress
  copytruncate
  nodateext
 }

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