I find myself needing to compute 16-bit unsigned integer divided by power of 2, which should result in a 32-bit float (standard IEEE format). This is on embedded system and the routine is repeatedly used so I am looking for something better than (float)x/(float)(1<<n). In addition, C compiler is pretty limited (no math lib, bit field, reinterpret_cast, etc).

  • I doubt you can get better without assembly, unless there are some compiler intrinsics. Also, profile, profile, profile. – Antimony Apr 9 '13 at 13:01
  • I pressume you mean "better than (float)x/float(y) where y is some power of 2"? Also what do you mean by "better"? – Xyzk Apr 9 '13 at 13:01
  • "Better" performance is what I am looking for – CoderSS Apr 9 '13 at 13:03

If you don't mind some bit twiddling then the obvious way to go is to convert the integer to float and then subtract n from the exponent bits to achieve the division by 2^n:

y = (float)x;                          // convert to float
uint32_t yi = *(uint32_t *)&y);        // get float value as bits
uint32_t exponent = yi & 0x7f800000;   // extract exponent bits 30..23
exponent -= (n << 23);                 // subtract n from exponent
yi = yi & ~0x7f800000 | exponent;      // insert modified exponent back into bits 30..23
y = *(float *)&yi;                     // copy bits back to float

Note that this fails for x = 0, so you should check x > 0 before conversion.

Total cost is one int-float conversion plus a handful of integer bitwise/arithmetic operations. If you use a union you can avoid having separate int/float representations and just work directly on the float.

  • Thanks. I was thinking about something like this too but did not know how to do the casting. And I suppose you meant uint32_t exponent = yi & 0x7f800000; Thank again!!! – CoderSS Apr 9 '13 at 13:24
  • Sorry - yes - typo fixed now. – Paul R Apr 9 '13 at 13:31
  • I don't have my system here so I cannot check yet. However, should I be worried that some compilers will normalize x when we do y = (float)x (e.g., x = 15, then 1.5E+1 is stored in y instead of 15E+0). Then, the modifying exponent part does not work correctly anymore. – CoderSS Apr 9 '13 at 13:31
  • 1
    As written, there is no need to extract the exponent to do the subtraction; it can be done in place: yi -= n << 23;. However, this code fails when x is zero. – Eric Postpischil Apr 9 '13 at 14:04
  • 1
    If the compiler supports compound literals, then the reinterpretation of the bits of a float may be done via uint32_t yi = (union { float f; uint32_t u; }) { y } .u, and reinterpreting them back with y = (union { uint32_t u; float f; }) { yi } .f. If the compiler does not support compound literals, then a union object may be defined for the same effect. This avoids the violation of pointer aliasing rules that is undefined by the C standard. – Eric Postpischil Apr 9 '13 at 14:06

Use ldexpf(x, -n). This function is defined by the C standard to do exactly what you want, return x•2-n, so any decent compiler will provide good code for this. (This requires either part of a math library or a compiler that optimizes this to inline code.)

If n is known at compile time, you can also consider x * (1.f/(1<<n)). A good compiler will compute (1.f/(1<<n)) at compile time, so the executable code will be two operations: Convert x to float and multiply by a constant. That might be faster than the code generated for ldexpf(x, -n) if the compiler does not optimize ldexpf(x, -n) as well as it might.

  • would be nice answer other than the user specified "In addition, C compiler is pretty limited (no math lib, bit field, reinterpret_cast, etc). " and this function is in math lib. – CashCow Apr 11 '13 at 11:36

A quick and easy solution is to precompute a table of float values of 2-n for n >= 0 (what's the upper limit for n, around 31?) and then multiply x by the nth element of the table.

This may not be the fastest if your code emulates floating point multiplication because the CPU doesn't support it directly.

You may, however, do it quicker using integer math only.

Example (assuming IEEE-754 32-bit floats):

#include <limits.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

#define C_ASSERT(expr) extern char CAssertExtern[(expr)?1:-1]

C_ASSERT(CHAR_BIT == 8);
C_ASSERT(sizeof(float) == 4);
C_ASSERT(sizeof(int) == 4);

float div(int x, unsigned n)
{
  float res;
  unsigned e = 0;
  unsigned sign = x < 0;
  unsigned m = sign ? -x : x;  

  if (m)
  {
    while (m >= (1u << 24))
      m >>= 1, e++;

    while (m < (1u << 23))
      m <<= 1, e--;

    e += 0x7F + 23;

    e -= n; // divide by 1<<n

    m ^= 1u << 23; // reset the implicit 1

    m |= (e & 0xFF) << 23; // mix in the exponent

    m |= sign << 31; // mix in the sign
  }

  memcpy(&res, &m, sizeof m);

  return res;
}

void Print4Bytes(unsigned char buf[4])
{
  printf("%02X%02X%02X%02X ", buf[3], buf[2], buf[1], buf[0]);
}

int main(void)
{
  int x = 0x35AA53;
  int n;
  for (n = 0; n < 31; n++)
  {
    float v1 = (float)x/(1u << n);
    float v2 = div(x, n);
    Print4Bytes((void*)&v1);
    printf("%c= ", "!="[memcmp(&v1, &v2, sizeof v1) == 0]);
    Print4Bytes((void*)&v2);
    printf("%14.6f %14.6f\n", v1, v2);
  }
  return 0;
}

Output (ideone):

4A56A94C == 4A56A94C 3517011.000000 3517011.000000
49D6A94C == 49D6A94C 1758505.500000 1758505.500000
4956A94C == 4956A94C  879252.750000  879252.750000
48D6A94C == 48D6A94C  439626.375000  439626.375000
4856A94C == 4856A94C  219813.187500  219813.187500
47D6A94C == 47D6A94C  109906.593750  109906.593750
4756A94C == 4756A94C   54953.296875   54953.296875
46D6A94C == 46D6A94C   27476.648438   27476.648438
4656A94C == 4656A94C   13738.324219   13738.324219
45D6A94C == 45D6A94C    6869.162109    6869.162109
4556A94C == 4556A94C    3434.581055    3434.581055
44D6A94C == 44D6A94C    1717.290527    1717.290527
4456A94C == 4456A94C     858.645264     858.645264
43D6A94C == 43D6A94C     429.322632     429.322632
4356A94C == 4356A94C     214.661316     214.661316
42D6A94C == 42D6A94C     107.330658     107.330658
4256A94C == 4256A94C      53.665329      53.665329
41D6A94C == 41D6A94C      26.832664      26.832664
4156A94C == 4156A94C      13.416332      13.416332
40D6A94C == 40D6A94C       6.708166       6.708166
4056A94C == 4056A94C       3.354083       3.354083
3FD6A94C == 3FD6A94C       1.677042       1.677042
3F56A94C == 3F56A94C       0.838521       0.838521
3ED6A94C == 3ED6A94C       0.419260       0.419260
3E56A94C == 3E56A94C       0.209630       0.209630
3DD6A94C == 3DD6A94C       0.104815       0.104815
3D56A94C == 3D56A94C       0.052408       0.052408
3CD6A94C == 3CD6A94C       0.026204       0.026204
3C56A94C == 3C56A94C       0.013102       0.013102
3BD6A94C == 3BD6A94C       0.006551       0.006551
3B56A94C == 3B56A94C       0.003275       0.003275
  • 1
    @EricPostpischil The OP said no math lib. – Alexey Frunze Apr 9 '13 at 14:02

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