3

I currently have this code that needs user input to pseudo-ify some words to send out and commit obfuscation on the integer later. I just need to get the user input. Anyone have a good source of api to get this from? I think I should be looking for System. commands.

Thanks in advance :)

9

The Scanner class was implemented in Java 5.0 to make getting input easier:

Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in) the System.in will allow for console input.

Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
int i = sc.nextInt();
/* will wait for input then assign it to the variable,
 * in this case it will wait for an int.
 */
System.out.println(i); // will print the variable

https://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/Scanner.html

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  • Does scanner have to be referenced as part of some class? Also, Is system auto imported? – user2262111 Apr 10 '13 at 0:08
  • System.in will automatically be included. – Joban Dhillon Apr 10 '13 at 0:09
  • 1
    @user System belongs to the lang package, and all classes in that package are included automatically. – Lone nebula Apr 10 '13 at 0:10
  • Oh, so wait. java.src.lang.System is the full path? – user2262111 Apr 10 '13 at 0:12
  • 1
    @user No the path is java.lang.System, but you don't have to import it. – Lone nebula Apr 10 '13 at 0:14
2

You might want to use the Scanner class: java.util.Scanner

The basic setup is simple:

Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
int number = scan.nextInt();

This sets up a scanner object and makes the scanner get an integer from the default input stream. However, this doesn't check to see if the user entered "good data". It will cause errors if the user enters anything other than a number. You might want to include a loop until the user enters valid data.

Here's the same code, but with error checking:

Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
boolean validData = false;
int number=0;
do{
    System.out.println("Enter a Number");
    try{
        number = scan.nextInt();//tries to get data. Goes to catch if invalid data
        validData = true;//if gets data successfully, sets boolean to true
    }catch(InputMismatchException e){
        //executes when this exception occurs
        System.out.println("Input has to be a number. ");
    }
}while(validData==false);//loops until validData is true

This program will ask the user to enter a number. If the user enters bad data, an InputMismatchException is thrown, taking the program to the catch clause and skiping setting validData to true. This loops until valid data is entered.

Hope this helps.

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  • The Scanner class includes methods like hasNext, hasNextInt, hasNextBoolean etc, which makes it a lot easier. – Lone nebula Apr 10 '13 at 0:30
2

Are you looking for this? As you asked about getting input via command line so if you run your java program via command line and want to pass it some inputs, they are received by args parameter in main. look here

Echoing Command-Line Arguments

The Echo example displays each of its command-line arguments on a line by itself:

public class Echo {
    public static void main (String[] args) {
        for (String s: args) {
            System.out.println(s);
        }
    }
}
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  • This is completely irrelevant. I'm looking for input, not output. – user2262111 Apr 10 '13 at 0:13
  • Don't you think the input is coming from command line through the 'args' parameter??? It's the way for getting input from command line and printing it on console. What else did you ask? – nommyravian Apr 10 '13 at 0:15
  • There is no input? How do you get input from the String[] args? My question was I wanted to incorporate user input so I can take it and user comparison commands with it. – user2262111 Apr 10 '13 at 0:20
  • Do you know how to run a java prgram from command line? When you've a java program say HelloWorld.java and want to run it using command line and take user inputs, you go open cmd, go to the directory where HelloWorld.java is, run the code and type the user inputs in command line. That's what my answer is all about because your asked how to get input from command line. Got it? – nommyravian Apr 10 '13 at 0:25
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    see here if you need to know how to run a program from command line; skylit.com/javamethods/faqs/javaindos.html – nommyravian Apr 10 '13 at 0:25
1

Yea, System.in will work fine for a small number of predictably entered commands. Apache has a nice little tool if you want a more pro/robust mechanism.

See: http://commons.apache.org/proper/commons-cli/

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  • Ah SO. You weird thing. Yes apparently 2 routes of parsing command line inputs one from Apache Commons is negative input. Today gets stranger and stranger. – OceanLife Apr 10 '13 at 0:28
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