I read in a comment to an answer by @Esailija to a question of mine that

ISO-8859-1 is the only encoding to fully retain the original binary data, with exact byte<->codepoint matches

I also read in this answer by @AaronDigulla that :

In Java, ISO-8859-1 (a.k.a ISO-Latin1) is a 1:1 mapping

I need some insight on this. This will fail (as illustrated here) :

// \u00F6 is ö
System.out.println(Arrays.toString("\u00F6".getBytes("utf-8")));
// prints [-61, -74]
System.out.println(Arrays.toString("\u00F6".getBytes("ISO-8859-1")));
// prints [-10]

Questions

  1. I admit I do not quite get it - why does it not get the bytes in the code above ?
  2. Most importantly, where is this (byte preserving behavior of ISO-8859-1) specified - links to source, or JSL would be nice. Is it the only encoding with this property ?
  3. Is it related to ISO-8859-1 being the default default ?

See also this question for nice counter examples from other charsets.

  • -10 is the base-10 signed value of 0xF6. Try byte b = -10; System.out.println(Integer.toHexString(b & 0xFF)); – JB Nizet Apr 10 '13 at 13:04
  • @JBNizet :This I know - what I am asking about is the quoted "ISO-8859-1 is the only encoding to fully retain the original binary data" in java - that's what I do not quite get - what you gave does print f6 - what are the bytes contained in "\u00F6" ? [-61, -74] or [-10] ? – Mr_and_Mrs_D Apr 10 '13 at 13:07
  • Err, you just said that you knew that -10 and f6 are the same byte, represented differently. So the bytes contained in 0x00F6 are 0 are F6 in base 16, or 0 and -10 in signed-base-10. – JB Nizet Apr 10 '13 at 13:12
  • @JBNiz : Why then it does not print [0, -10] - supposing that ISO-8859-1 is byte preserving - that is what I do not get - the reported "byte preserving" behavior of ISO-8859-1 in java. – Mr_and_Mrs_D Apr 10 '13 at 13:15
  • OK. Now I get what you mean. See my answer. – JB Nizet Apr 10 '13 at 13:23
up vote 11 down vote accepted

"\u00F6" is not a byte array. It's a string containing a single char. Execute the following test instead:

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    byte[] b = new byte[] {(byte) 0x00, (byte) 0xf6};
    String s = new String(b, "ISO-8859-1"); // decoding
    byte[] b2 = s.getBytes("ISO-8859-1"); // encoding
    System.out.println("Are the bytes equal : " + Arrays.equals(b, b2)); // true
}

To check that this is true for any byte, just improve the code an loop through all the bytes:

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    byte[] b = new byte[256];
    for (int i = 0; i < b.length; i++) {
        b[i] = (byte) i;
    }
    String s = new String(b, "ISO-8859-1");
    byte[] b2 = s.getBytes("ISO-8859-1");
    System.out.println("Are the bytes equal : " + Arrays.equals(b, b2));
}

ISO-8859-1 is a standard encoding. So the language used (Java, C# or whatever) doesn't matter.

Here's a Wikipedia reference that claims that every byte is covered:

In 1992, the IANA registered the character map ISO_8859-1:1987, more commonly known by its preferred MIME name of ISO-8859-1 (note the extra hyphen over ISO 8859-1), a superset of ISO 8859-1, for use on the Internet. This map assigns the C0 and C1 control characters to the unassigned code values thus provides for 256 characters via every possible 8-bit value.

(emphasis mine)

  • Thank you - this answers 1 - I really need some authoritative link to ascertain/deny 2) - or some explanation - namely the byte preserving behavior of ISO-8859-1 - and that it is the only one (in java and possibly other languages I guess like C#). For other charsets see : stackoverflow.com/questions/2544965/… – Mr_and_Mrs_D Apr 10 '13 at 13:27
  • Thanks - do you believe it is the only ENCODING with this property : byte[] b = newByteArray(); Arrays.equals(b, new String(b, ENCODING).getBytes(ENCODING)); // always true ? – Mr_and_Mrs_D Apr 10 '13 at 14:14
  • 1
    I don't know if it's the only one, no. – JB Nizet Apr 10 '13 at 20:38
  • 1
    @Mr_and_Mrs_D it is the only one where the decoded code point's value is also the byte's value it was decoded from (\u00F6 <-> 0xF6). That's what I meant. So you have the decoded string, and encoded bytes, then it is always (byte)str.charAt(i) == bytes[i] for arbitrary binary data where str is new String(bytes, "ISO-8859-1") – Esailija Apr 10 '13 at 22:34
  • 1
    @Mr_and_Mrs_D it is also a rare property but not unique to ISO-8859-1 for a lossless round-trip: bytes -> string -> bytes with arbitrary binary data. – Esailija Apr 10 '13 at 22:40

For an encoding to retain original binary data, it needs to map every unique byte sequence to an unique character sequence.

This rules out all multi-byte encodings (UTF-8/16/32, Shift-Jis, Big5 etc) because not every byte sequence is valid in them and thus would decode to some replacement character (usually ? or �). There is no way to tell from the string what caused the replacement character after it has been decoded.

Another option is to ignore the invalid bytes but this also means that infinite different byte sequences decode to the same string. You could replace invalid bytes with their hex encoding in the string like "0xFF". There is no way to tell if the original bytes legitimately decoded to "0xFF" so that doesn't work either.

This leaves 8-bit encodings, where every sequence is just a single byte. The single byte is valid if there is a mapping for it. But many 8-bit encodings have holes and don't encode 256 different characters.

To retain original binary data, you need 8-bit encoding that encodes 256 different characters. ISO-8859-1 is not unique in this. But what it is unique in, is that the decoded code point's value is also the byte's value it was decoded from.

So you have the decoded string, and encoded bytes, then it is always

(byte)str.charAt(i) == bytes[i] 

for arbitrary binary data where str is new String(bytes, "ISO-8859-1") and bytes is a byte[].


It also has nothing to do with Java. I have no idea what his comment means, these are properties of character encodings not programming languages.

  • The comment was meant to put this all in code perspective (notice also "In Java, ISO-8859-1 (a.k.a ISO-Latin1) is a 1:1 mapping")- aka I don't know how all this would look in C - very informative answer @JBNizet ("But what it is unique in, is that the decoded code point's value is also the byte's value it was decoded from") +1 :) – Mr_and_Mrs_D Apr 11 '13 at 0:15

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